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10-20 acres Homestead how would you

 
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If you had a chance to homestead a old farmstead in South Dakota between 10 and twenty acres how would you make your living what would you do diary, pigs. It would be near Sioux Falls so there is an organic market. But the former owner was a junk collector so there is usable land but it would be a constant reclamation process for a couple years so how would you make a living while slowly reclaiming the farmstead into more usable space.  
 
pollinator
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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I would only farm 1acres, maybe 2acres.
I would grow herbs/garlic/thyme/etc, if you can fully tap into the herb market you can easily make alot of money.
Next would be a vegetable market garden (CSA, farmers market, resturant, etc)
Next I would do mushroom.
If you can find 7 really good landscaping contract, where you grow your own flowers/herbs/etc (nursery), there might be some money.
Honey Bee Farming making $500 per hive selling honey and or bees. 50 Hives for $25,000
Egg Farm (CSA) I am thinking 15 dozen eggs per chicken at $4 per dozen so $60 revenue per chicken. With 300 layers, about $18,000

I don't think there is much money to be made growing wheat/corn/cow/hog.
The carrying capacity is probably about 1 cow per 10 acres, so maybe you can have 3 cows on 20acres. But with a feedlot setup you could rear alot, say 250cows. $250 profit per cow = $62,500
 
Hank Waltner
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There is a ethanol plant so Wet and Dried distillers grain are cheap. I would plan on growing most of all my chickens feed if I could
 
pollinator
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Location: Missoula, MT
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start growing weird fruit https://greenhouseinthesnow.com/
 
Hank Waltner
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The feed lot is an idea on my mind with all the farm country and the ethanol plant. My dad and I raise cattle in North Dakota so I already know how and where to get som good steers.
 
pollinator
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Location: Bendigo , Australia
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A couple of points.
Do you have a photo of the precious objects saved by the previous owner?
If you study grain feeding of animals you will see it is actually bad for the stock and produces bad meat.
No I am not a vegan in disguise.
Read the book, 'The omnivores dilemma" where the author was writing about the life of a calf he bought and was going with it through its life, treatment path etc.
He was shocked at what the Vets at the feed lot told him.
Buy the book

A summary iof the book

10 yeras after the book, a comment
 
Hank Waltner
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“John C Daley” do you mean do I have pictures of the old stuff at the farm
 
pollinator
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Location: Ohio 5b6a
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Driving through the area you are talking about I have notice old tractors and farm equipment sitting all over the place.  I would think that some of the stuff could be torn apart and sold on ebay.  Old engines such as briggs and maytags bring huge amounts of cash.  I've seen carburetors go for $400.  Scraping is another thing that is a money making hobby.  In our area we have an old farmer that collects all sorts of farm equipment and the largest white tailed deer I've ever seen was harvested in the middle of the rows of stuff.  This is a picture of an old briggs I fixed up from a barn sale.  They tell me it is worth $1200.
IMG_20160701_211006808.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20160701_211006808.jpg]
 
Hank Waltner
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So my grandpa farmed there his whole life and his farther before him and he bought old tractors and junk from farm sales all the time and he never fixed it just piled it up but he died farming and I want to buy It from my dad and his siblings. This is all a dream and idea of a 16 year old and his dad.
 
John C Daley
pollinator
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Yes, just a general shot.
You seemed to be suggesting it was junk, and as has already ben suggested it may not be junk.
Good luck with it anyway
 
Hank Waltner
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I did kinda suggest it was junk cause most people see it that way. It’s alway Hank who hails away the “junk”. Some people thought I was a hoarder at age 13 but I’m not I just see value in things others don’t. Wood ash is valuable old motors heck yah. But I commonly refer to it as junk. The place is all junked up there’s a lot of treasures but there is a fair bit of real junk. Most of the old buildings are fallen in so there would be a lot of work to be done but that’s what I’m drawn to.  
 
pollinator
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Before deciding what kind of farm to have, I recommend a little introspection first. Lots of farms make money selling fresh produce at farmers markets, but if dealing with people is exhausting and stressful for you, it might not be a good fit. Some people do well with lots of animals that take all day to care for, others do better with just a few or none at all.

Also, take a close look at that organic market to see if there's enough demand to support another supplier.

Personally, I went through many false starts and dead ends before finding my niche. I'm currently a contract grower for a major seed company. They send me seeds for free, I grow them out as best I can, and they pay me pretty well for the seeds I produce. I like the fact that I don't have to do the marketing, packaging, customer service, etc. I just grow things, then clean and dry the seeds. But that doesn't fit everyone. The level of isolation I prefer would drive most people insane.

Try a few things, starting small, until you find the one that fits you.
 
S Bengi
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Yes getting just 7 or so contract is great. It could be where you supply restaurants or a reseller.  
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