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Possible American Ginseng find on property

 
pollinator
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I found this (see below) growing near our compost bins. My best guess for identification is American Ginseng. However, I'm just going by the leaves, as it hasn't flowered yet.

On the Ontario.ca website, they tell me that it grows in rich, moist, well-drained soils (right beside the compost is almost certainly that), and that it's found near sugar maples, among other trees--and mine is about 5 feet from a sugar maple. It's apparently considered an endangered species in Ontario.

It's on the north side of the house in a very shaded location. Our soil in general is, I think, a sandy loam. But right beside the compost bin it's obviously a lot richer. The bin is an open style, so I'm sure the nutrient make their way into the nearby soil.

So I'm kind of excited if that's what it is! Eventually, if it grows and spreads/reproduces, I could harvest a little bit for health or medicinal purposes.

Can anyone help me positively ID this?

Does anyone else grow this, and/or harvest it?
possible-ginseng.jpg
[Thumbnail for possible-ginseng.jpg]
 
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Honestly it looks more like Virginia creeper though I haven't seen ginseng in the wild since I was a kid.
 
Heidi Schmidt
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Oh darn, you could be right about that. I'm not familiar with Virginia Creeper, but now that I look it up, it could very well be. I guess time will tell, when I get flowers or berries.
 
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I also think that is virginia creeper.
 
Heidi Schmidt
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Ah well, thanks for the input from you both. There goes that dream! But maybe I'll move it and train it decorate a fence or something.
 
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I’m not sure how common Virginia creeper is in Ontario. It will grow rampantly in Vermont and wind itself around everything. Be forewarned!
 
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I once thought I found some ginseng,..
because of the red berries and leaf shape.
It was Jack in the Pulpit, ha.
 
Heidi Schmidt
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Anne Pratt wrote:I’m not sure how common Virginia creeper is in Ontario. It will grow rampantly in Vermont and wind itself around everything. Be forewarned!



Thanks! I will be cautious!
 
Heidi Schmidt
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craig howard wrote: I once thought I found some ginseng,..
because of the red berries and leaf shape.
It was Jack in the Pulpit, ha.



I am SO glad I'm not alone here
 
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Virginia creeper affects some people in the same way as poison ivy and poison oak. Don't be like me. I ought to own stock in caladryl.
 
Heidi Schmidt
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Joylynn Hardesty wrote:Virginia creeper affects some people in the same way as poison ivy and poison oak. Don't be like me. I ought to own stock in caladryl.



Ahhh, ok... that is also very good to know. Thank you.
 
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I also identified some wild ginseng on my property, late last season when it had the red berries. I have tons of Virginia creeper too. The look similar above ground, but creeper will always have friends growing out of the same vine (that can CREEP for 50 feet underground before it pops up to say hello in your flower beds. I know ginseng to usually have the two inner most leaves smaller than the others (where creeper would have same sized leaves.) So that's a lot of words to say "I'm conflicted!" This page may help http://identifythatplant.com/virginia-creeper-and-ginseng/
 
Heidi Schmidt
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Matt Todd wrote:I also identified some wild ginseng on my property, late last season when it had the red berries. I have tons of Virginia creeper too. The look similar above ground, but creeper will always have friends growing out of the same vine (that can CREEP for 50 feet underground before it pops up to say hello in your flower beds. I know ginseng to usually have the two inner most leaves smaller than the others (where creeper would have same sized leaves.) So that's a lot of words to say "I'm conflicted!" This page may help http://identifythatplant.com/virginia-creeper-and-ginseng/



Very helpful, thank you! When I look at it, those look like petioles to me in my pic :)

I DIDN'T know that it could creep like that underground. That's not great! We have one beautiful hand-built (by us) wooden shed, and one ugly, old metal one that came with the property, and I was thinking last night that I could cover the ugliness in Virginia creeper! But you guys are making me a little bit scared of it... I guess I'll have to wait until it either gives me red berries or eats my house... then I'll know for sure :)

Also, congrats on finding some actual wild ginseng!
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