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Plant ID in CT: probably jewel weed, and...?

 
Burra Maluca
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We've had a request from a potential new member for help identifying these plants, who said...

"Got two things growing in my yard that not even the chickens want and I can't get rid of them HELP"

He's based in Connecticut USA on the shoreline, which isn't exactly my area of expertise...

Can anyone help?





 
Craig Dobbelyu
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the first one looks a little like Jewelweed. I'm no expert though. If it is jewelweed then it's edible.
 
Patrick Mann
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Location: Seattle, WA, USA
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I think the lower 2 pictures show lovage
 
Gordon Hogenson
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The latter two look very much like Mugwort, Artemisia vulgaris.
 
Pamela Melcher
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Location: Portland, Oregon Maritime, temperate, zone 7-8.
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I also think the first is jewelweed. If so, there is some way in which it helps with either poison oak or ivy. Details unknown, but WORTH checking out. It is used in commercial preparations to lessen the impact of these. If it is jewelweed, it has very pretty orange and yellow flowers and spreads fast in fertile, moist places.
 
Elisha Gray
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Location: Sussex County, NJ
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I agree, the first looks like Jewelweed and the 2nd Mugwort. I'm not too far from Connecticut and I have these all over my property. The best way to check if its jewel weed is to see how water beads up and rolls off the leaves.

Jewelweed is one of those volunteers that I let run wild, personally I use it for minor skin irritations (it works about as well as any off the shelf ointment). I find that it loves to volunteer near my compost pile, and I'm not going to fight with any invasive plant that neutralizes Poison Ivy oils if applied before the rash sets.

Steve Brill is a forager in the north east and has a great write up on how to identify/use Jewelweed is: http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/Plants.Folder/Jewelweed.html. He also links to a so-so Mugwort video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4itYSPTnL88
 
Brenda Groth
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middle one looks like celery, so possibly there was a bottom of a celery in the compost..or it could be a celery relative, as was mentioned above, like Lovage
 
Pamela Melcher
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Location: Portland, Oregon Maritime, temperate, zone 7-8.
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Pictures of, and information about, Jewelweed.

http://livingafield.com/Plants_Jewelweed.htm

I hope this helps.

Pamela Melcher
 
duane hennon
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I agree the first is jewelweed or "touch-me-nots"
the seed pod is "spring loaded" and will pop scattering the seed
dispersal agent is little kids

the second looks like mugwort
crush a leaf and smell - a medicinal odor will confirm
if not, maybe celery or lovage - take a bite
 
Pamela Melcher
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Location: Portland, Oregon Maritime, temperate, zone 7-8.
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I lived where jewelweed spread all over the place.

It was near a pond, on very rich alluvial soil. Blackberries grew 7 feet high around there.

Some jerk, before I lived there, had sprayed the whole area with weed killer and after about 20 years vegetation returned to this area that had been bare, and jewelweed was one of the first and really was happy there and had lots of babies.

I had never seen this plant before. It seemed to just arrive out of nowhere. I was happy to have the company. The bare sick soil was so sad.

It thrives even in shade.

I got the sense that it was not the type to seriously deprive other plants of nutrients, and that if I had wanted to, I could have very easily greatly reduced the numbers, if not eliminated it, but I chose not to.

It is very sweet when it blooms.

I hope that is helpful.

Best Wishes,
Pamela Melcher
 
Paulo Bessa
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The first one looks like from the Chenopodium family (and less similar but still possible from the Mint family). I have no clear idea of what it is.

The second one could be from the Carrot family (it will have a umbella flower) or the Sunflower family (then the flower would look like a daisy, sunflower, dandelion or aster).

If its from the carrot family, its not celery neither lovage, because I am familiar with these two plants. Just rub and see the smell, whether it is celery like (lovage as a strong and pleasant smell just like cooking broth). Other plants from the carrot families can be right DEADLY and very similar, so be extremely CAREFUL!

If its sunflower family, it could be mugwort, it actually looks like one, but only the typical strong medicinal smell would confirm it. Mugwort is a risky tea to drink, it can have several side effects and damage the liver. Some even give you minor hallucinations. Mugwort can have different leaves, even color of leaves, but their spike flowering stem is typical (as is its smell).
 
Nancy Sinclaire
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I am doubling up on the duane hennon post saying "I agree the first is jewelweed or "touch-me-nots" the seed pod is "spring loaded" and will pop scattering the seed dispersal agent is little kids." They kindly grow where ever poison ivy grows. The stem is crisp, plump, and juicy like that of an impatient flower. The juice is said to be useful on poison ivy. Just squish it on like aloe. The plant quickly grows, like a weed, to the size of a person. Fun, tiny, ripe bean pods with tendrils tease children into touching them. Snap, they explode! Natural fireworks. Quite entertaining. Gotta touch 'em all. Grandparents who know this stuff are way cool in children's eyes. The plants can not possibly do any harm anywhere. Brushing them breaks the fragile stem.

Yes, I know these weeds but can not think what they are. Enjoy them. And the chicken and home depo bucket hiding in the picture.

The jewel weed is common on walks in the woods and may not need room in the garden.

I think I am off on the next two but wild geranium, wild chrysamthimum wild something or other come to mind. They are doing good work for the owner.
 
Aljaz Plankl
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I really don't think the second one is lovage or mugworth. To me, it looks like feverfew.
 
Brenda Groth
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no way # 2 is wild geranium, did you taste or smell of it yet..it is also not wild carrot
 
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