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Blade repair...where to begin?

 
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All righty now  

I was scything early and decided to mow the path short as we have been doing with the kobalt mower...and then forgot which direction I had left the blade in the long grass when I leaned the snath against the hoop house....and there it is...ran over the tip with the power mower. Mower blade made it out OK, not so my scythe blade.

So.....we have an anvil and big hammers?
Peening again looks like the easy part.

Where to begin?


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It won't be easy to iron out damage that severe, but you'll probably get the best results using a wooden or plastic mallet against a wood block because metal-on-metal-on-metal will spread the steel when you're just trying to knock it back into place. Look into freehand sheet metal forming techniques used by auto body and aviation workers and you'll see some possible techniques to use. Sometimes simply using wood as your backing surface and using a steel hammer will be appropriate, other times a soft-faced hammer is needed.
 
Judith Browning
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Thank you for giving me a place to begin.

Fortunately I have another blade so have put this one back for the moment and won't rush the repair..
 
Judith Browning
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I decided to try....Steve found his wooden mallets and using the smaller one, hitting with the end grain against an oak board I'm making slow progress.  Need to find a more solid place to set up than the bench and maybe a more curved surface to hit against?

Pounded until my hand ached so will take some time to find out if it's still usable.....

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I am impressed with your results so far.  You are doing much better than I thought possible.
 
Benjamin Bouchard
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Looking much better already! Glad the techniques are producing the expected result!
 
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You can use the anvil and hammer, just only hit where the blade is in a ripple. That way you are not squeezing the metal. Also if it is becoming work hardened you may need to anneal the metal, otherwise it may crack.
 
Benjamin Bouchard
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You have to deflect it past the yield point. I would specifically advise against using a steel anvil with a steel hammer unless you're working over the hardy or pritchel holes to give the blade room to move into. You can end up permanently warping the blade if you over-tension a zone.
 
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I'd be interested to see if the currugated edge cuts better or worse as it is.
 
Judith Browning
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]Jordan Holland wrote:I'd be interested to see if the currugated edge cuts better or worse as it is.



I wondered at that, although then peening and even sharpening would be next to impossible I think?
If I thought it might improve the cut for bermuda grass I might try but as it is I'll just keep pounding away
 
Benjamin Bouchard
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The undulations are unlikely to improve cutting performance. However, setting a toothy scratch pattern with a coarse stone followed by a single light pass with a fine stone to crisp up the apex without erasing that coarse scratch pattern will generally give the best total slicing aggression.
 
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Benjamin, you are a wealth of knowledge. Thank you for sharing...Prior to reading this, I would have tried to pound the bugger into submission. ("patience, Grasshopper")...You'd think that after 63 years I should have mastered patience...Not...I'm a work in progress...Thanks again.
 
Judith Browning
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Getting there....

And on the plus side this has got me peening and sharpening my other blade...what was called a 'garden' blade...a shorter heavier one for getting up close...edging and fruit trees....not necessary as the other did that as well but it's what I have at the moment.

The marks showing in the third photo are patterning on the blade not something from mine or Steve's pounding.
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John Duffy
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Looks like you're on the right track. It's getting there. Nice work!
 
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That is much better then I expected.  You must have more patience then you give yourself credit for.  
I think at this point you may need to change to a sand bag for a backer.  The ripples need to be driven past straight alignment, so they spring back into alignment.
And remember  good enough to work is not a perfectly straight blade.  Tom.
 
Benjamin Bouchard
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At this stage a ball pein hammer on the end grain of a stump would probably work. The end grain should crush so the metal won't squish.
 
Judith Browning
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Not flat but closer....I can still feel ripples and they show differently in the photos....that one near the tip I thought was flatter than that...done for today.

Thanks Benjamin!
I ended up using the flat side of the hammer also...the log is sassafras.
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Judith Browning
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Thomas Michael wrote:That is much better then I expected.  You must have more patience then you give yourself credit for.  
I think at this point you may need to change to a sand bag for a backer.  The ripples need to be driven past straight alignment, so they spring back into alignment.
And remember  good enough to work is not a perfectly straight blade.  Tom.


Thank you Tom...
I was interested in the sand bag?  We think it's something our jeweler friends use.
They must come at different densities? It sounds useful to have around.

Hopefully I never do this again...my mistakes are mostly one of a kind  
 
John Duffy
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I'm impressed! It's looking like a scythe blade again...Nice work.
 
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