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Pacific crab apple or not?

 
pollinator
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I remembered seeing apple trees in blossom, spring 2020, on a walk. I meant to go back last Autumn and then forgot. This year, I remembered and when I arrived, I found something unknown. I did some searching and was 99% sure I had found a pacific crab apple tree. There were two of them with lots of fruit, so I harvested a small amount. I headed over to where I had seen some more blossom and there was another apple tree but the fruit were slightly bigger and more appley - not yellow, like the first tree. I did some more searching and came to the conclusion that this was pacific crab apple - so what was the first tree?

Here are some pictures. Thanks
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those lobey leaves suggest Crataegus to me…i’ve grafted crabapples onto hawthornes, and it makes me wonder if they might hybridize if given the chance…and if that’s what you’ve got.
 
Edward Norton
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Yes - definitely more like a yellow hawthorn. Thank you.
Now I have to figure out if they’re edible and what I can make from them.
 
greg mosser
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i think all hawthorn fruit is edible. now, palatable? that can be a different story.
 
Edward Norton
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I have a recipe for Saucy haw ketchup and a play on sloe gin using brandy and haws.

Thanks
 
greg mosser
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cool. i hope you update this thread with the results!
 
Edward Norton
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Haw ketchup is off the menu.

Step 1) 500g haw + 300g vinegar. Gently simmer for 30 minutes with a lid on the pot. The fruit should break up and then you can strain.

My fruit soaked up all the vinegar. I mashed them with a potato masher, added half a litre of water and they soaked that up. I think if I wrapped them in muslin and put in a cheese press, I might get a couple of tablespoons, not the half litre I need for stage 2.
 
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