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dehydrated fruits in bread

 
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I wonder if this works. I'm sure it does, so what are the best fruits for bread making.
 
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Dried fruits in the dough make for tasty bread with a long shelf life. The fruits even out the moisture in the bread to keep it from going stale.

At Christmas, I make German stollen, a yeast bread which has dried & candied fruits and nuts. You are supposed to make it weeks ahead, like a fruitcake.  This year I used chopped dried apricots, sultanas, and candied lemon peel as the fruit.

Last year I also tried the more rustic “fruechtebrot” mentioned by a German permie. The recipe I found had you simmer raisins and other fruits, then use the leftover simmer liquid in the bread and also to baste the loaf.
 
Gene Short
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We lived in Germany and the brown bread and peanut butter was 8 brothers and sister's favorite. I can't remember the name, but it was good. Thanks for the reply. Gene.
 
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Mk Neal wrote:Dried fruits in the dough make for tasty bread with a long shelf life. The fruits even out the moisture in the bread to keep it from going stale.

At Christmas, I make German stollen, a yeast bread which has dried & candied fruits and nuts. You are supposed to make it weeks ahead, like a fruitcake.  This year I used chopped dried apricots, sultanas, and candied lemon peel as the fruit.

Last year I also tried the more rustic “fruechtebrot” mentioned by a German permie. The recipe I found had you simmer raisins and other fruits, then use the leftover simmer liquid in the bread and also to baste the loaf.


Yeah, that was probably me!
I did not get around baking Früchtebrot this year. Instead I included them in a normal cake. Well, maybe next year.
I grew up with both Stollen (from my aunt) and Früchtebrot (bought) but my kids don't like either. They prefer the supermarket Lebkuchen (German gingerbread), duh!
BTW, traditional round and small gingerbread dough is also fermented for about a week so they could qualify almost as sourdough.
 
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I have used raisins and cinnamon, it makes great toasts for breakfast or a treat at tea time.  Cranberries and walnuts goes well with cheese.  Chopped dried figs are not bad also but in France, bread is a staple food so it tends to stay plain -  hence my lack of originality and willingness.  I would imagine that you could experiment with many others, try a small loaf at the time and see which one you like best.  Good luck with your baking!
 
Gene Short
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Thanks for the reply and great information, Geno.
 
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The Italian panettone bread has raisins and citrus peels.  But it's hard to make your own, and only sold in store around Thanksgiving.
 
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I make a 3 fruit bread in my bread machine for festive occasions. I always use my home-dried apples - they tend to melt to nothing, but still add sweetness. I frequently use cranberries because "festive" usually means Thanksgiving or the Winter Solstice. I've used dried apricots, dried cherries (pricey if I have to buy them and the squirrels always get all my home-grown ones) and dried blueberries as the 3rd if I'm celebrating with my friend who's raisin incompatible. Another friend has some sort of Merlot grape vine which she doesn't harvest. If the weather's at all decent, I make raisins out of them, and they add a subtle but unique flavour. A little organic lemon or orange zest is always welcome. I'm sensitive to sulfites and some colourings, so I avoid the artificial "candied fruit" and sub things like the cherries and home-dried raisins.
 
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Anita Martin wrote:
BTW, traditional round and small gingerbread dough is also fermented for about a week so they could qualify almost as sourdough.



Oh, I want to make fermented gingerbread now!  Is this  how they make the sugar-glazed "lebkuchen"? Or is it something different?
 
Mk Neal
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Jay Angler wrote:I make a 3 fruit bread in my bread machine for festive occasions. I always use my home-dried apples - they tend to melt to nothing, but still add sweetness. I frequently use cranberries because "festive" usually means Thanksgiving or the Winter Solstice. I've used dried apricots, dried cherries (pricey if I have to buy them and the squirrels always get all my home-grown ones) and dried blueberries as the 3rd if I'm celebrating with my friend who's raisin incompatible. Another friend has some sort of Merlot grape vine which she doesn't harvest. If the weather's at all decent, I make raisins out of them, and they add a subtle but unique flavour. A little organic lemon or orange zest is always welcome. I'm sensitive to sulfites and some colourings, so I avoid the artificial "candied fruit" and sub things like the cherries and home-dried raisins.



Those sound like delicious combinations!
 
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