Win a Fokin hoe blade this week in the Gear forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Mike Jay
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Miles Flansburg
garden masters:
  • Dan Boone
  • Dave Burton
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Shawn Klassen-Koop
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Barkley

HELICICULTURE= Farming Snails

 
pollinator
Posts: 442
Location: Pennsylvania Pocono Mt Neutral-Acidic Elv1024ft AYR41in Zone 5b
26
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Heliciculture-Farming Snails. I not sure if this in viable in my area Pennsylvania, USA zone 6 but it sure is interesting. Anyone practicing Heliciculture







http://afsic.nal.usda.gov/grazing-systems-and-alternative-livestock-breeds/raising-alternative-livestock-breeds/snails



 
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
14
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We have tons of the culinary snails around here, I've never captured them and fed them corn and such to make them good, mostly because our ducks LOVE eating them, and in turn I eat the ducks.
 
Rick Roman
pollinator
Posts: 442
Location: Pennsylvania Pocono Mt Neutral-Acidic Elv1024ft AYR41in Zone 5b
26
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I luv eating snails ( escargot). I have read snails must be purged of intestinal grit before eating them.
 
Posts: 383
Location: Roseburg, Oregon
15
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We are overrun with snails and slugs in my area, I can imagine actually trying to encourage them...
 
Posts: 13
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is also something I'm interested in, though I'm having the toughest time finding a supplier.

Does anyone know where I could source some helix pomatia?
 
Posts: 36
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
http://www.agf.gov.bc.ca/resmgmt/publist/700Series/770.000-1.pdf

For those in BC, Canada

I have considered doing this and seeing your topic here made me even more curious. We have literally thousands here and we live in a rural, organic area so presumably they would be okay to eat.
 
Posts: 48
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Heliculture is not allowd here in Fl, i checked into it. Still snails can be found purged and fattened easily for a home hobby.
 
Posts: 20
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
"We are overrun with snails and slugs in my area, I can imagine actually trying to encourage them.."

I am not an expert but "the problem is the solution" is like permaculture 101. Maybe encouraging them is exactly what you should be doing if they are thriving without management already you could do well. I have been looking into this myself although more of an idle curiosity because I cannot farm at the moment. That was a good article because I have not yet heard that they may be banned in certain areas. It would be such a nightmare to be "that guy" who unleashed some mutant giant snail upon the midwest for example.
I will definitely be digging deeper into this in the future. Maybe it could be a keystone kind of project for someone clever to make a name for themselves, what are the possibilities of snail breeding and hybrids, startup costs for netting ect, what is the local market, how can they be integrated into other agricultural systems?
In fact, and maybe this is fodder for another topic, but it seems to me I have not seen much info about mollusca cultivation in general. I know there is a guy in Tennessee growing the only freshwater pearls in the US. I found that so intriguing. I believe you do harvest the meat in the process so it is a bit of a food/ag crop. But it can be done and I would wonder what others have to say about it. If I could get a little gemstone inside every potato or carrot I grew, I think that would be an idea worth exploring. Anyone know about mollusc farming?
 
Scott Raber
Posts: 20
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have just been following this a little more deeply here. I did find a link to PennSnailFarm, but the hyperlink did not bring me to a website. The USDA has a good section of links in their alternative agriculture area online. Have not found anything on sericulture there though. African snails are banned here in the midwest.
 
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
All interested in breeding snails, as well as those already breeding I invite you to the newly created, international forum https://snailsfarming.club. Tips, help, contacts, opinions about snail farming.
 
gardener
Posts: 2330
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
151
forest garden trees urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I find the thought of eating invertebrates nauseating,  but I realize that is a personal shortcoming.
Snails are not quite as bad as slugs,  and slugs are not as horrific as starfish.
Earthworms otoh are wholesome and really cool,  but not for eating.
This is the nature of my insanity...

I imagine snails would make excellent chicken feed,  so I am interested in raising the nightmares.
Without  me having to comb through information that makes my skin crawl,  I'm curious if snails can be fattened on a waste stream,  food or otherwise,  or do they need something more refined?
If they could thrive on algae, a tank of snails and algae and snails could be a food source for chooks.

Back to nightmare fuel,  presumably these snails could escape.
Even snails that are strictly aquatic could spread by eggs if kept in an open tank.
I'm going go check the weed torch, to ease my troubled mind...
 
Posts: 174
Location: North Coast Dominican Republic
21
forest garden tiny house trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Ichabod Shorthouse wrote:Heliculture is not allowed here in Fl, i checked into it. Still snails can be found, purged, and fattened easily for a home hobby.



The reason for this is that pest snails, such as the African giant snail, have been brought into too many places as part of misguided heliciculture schemes. In any such project, it is important to understand whether you will be able to find a market for the product. African giant snail schemes have tended to be promoted in places where there is either no tradition of eating snails, or a cultural preference for other species of snails such as the escargot. When the would-be heliciculturist belatedly discovers there is no money to be made, sometimes they just release or abandon the snails, instead of taking care to destroy them.
 
pollinator
Posts: 316
Location: Virginia
86
books chicken cooking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

William Bronson wrote:
I imagine snails would make excellent chicken feed,  so I am interested in raising the nightmares.
Without  me having to comb through information that makes my skin crawl,  I'm curious if snails can be fattened on a waste stream,  food or otherwise,  or do they need something more refined?
If they could thrive on algae, a tank of snails and algae and snails could be a food source for chooks. .



Its entirely possible my chickens are finky, although they happily chow down stink bugs.  I have different breeds of chickens and only one of the breeds (red star) would eat snails.  The others (brahma, isa browns, americana, RI red, black star and my home hybrids) all turns their beaks up and ignore them.  Maybe you can find a test snail or two?
 
pollinator
Posts: 1407
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
389
books forest garden rabbit solar tiny house woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My own chickens don't eat much in the way of live snails. But they greedily chow down cooked ones.

I'm actually considering trying to raise snails and leopard slugs for chicken food. Looking in my farm's boneyard, I think I have enough materials to cobble together 2-3 heliciculture pens. And have have enough wastage from the garden to use for feeding them. It would be a very cheap added source of protein for my chickens.
 
Tina Hillel
pollinator
Posts: 316
Location: Virginia
86
books chicken cooking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow, cooking snails for the chickens never remotely crossed my mind.  Interesting idea. Also sounds like a perfect suggestion to give the nephews...another in a growing list my sister is hating me for😝

Thanks for the idea Su Ba.  Looks like I will be the one looking for test snails!
 
Su Ba
pollinator
Posts: 1407
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
389
books forest garden rabbit solar tiny house woodworking
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
<<<another in a growing list my sister is hating me for😝 >>>

Hahahahahaha! Decades ago when our close friends' children were young, we often gave the kids Christmas presents that their parents wouldn't......glitter, stickum reinforcements, rubber cement, scotch tape, staplers, whistles, confetti, the sort of things that parents hate. It was evil fun, to be sure.
 
Humans and their filthy friendship brings nothing but trouble. My only solace is this tiny ad:
Thread Boost feature
https://permies.com/wiki/61482/Thread-Boost-feature
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!