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The Cold and Fava Beans  RSS feed

 
Steve Flanagan
gardener
Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
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Last night the temperature got down to 23 F. My Fava Beans are looking very droopy and sad. Do you think they will recover?
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5766
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Mine are only up an inch and are still ok after temperatures as low as 15 degrees F. I planted late and haven't grown them in years. I remember mature plants getting blackened from the cold one January but I think that was single digits.
 
Eric Thompson
Posts: 372
Location: Bothell, WA - USA
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They may top die, but if they have decent root depth they will re-sprout - maybe even with 2-3 stalks next time..
 
David Hartley
Posts: 258
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I have yet to grow them However; I have done some reading up on them From what I have read, there seems to be varying "winter-kill" temps. Some are reported to begin sensitivity at around 25F, while others are hardier to 15F... I would think that prevailing winds, frost pockets and the degree of multch and microbe activity would have an impact.
 
Vladimir Horowitz
Posts: 23
Location: N. Idaho, zone 5
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I grew favas for the first time this year and was quite impressed with their cold tolerance. The variety was "Windsor" and IIRC they handled the 20's well, in the teens all of the bean pods died off first and some of the top leaves as well but they did continue to grow until I chopped and dropped em! Very impressive plant, it has made my top 5 survival plants lineup(they are high in protein!).
 
Steve Flanagan
gardener
Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
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Out of curiosity, Vladimir, what are the other plants in your top five survival plants lineup?
 
Alder Burns
pollinator
Posts: 1365
Location: northern California
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They will be fine. Mine came through 12 one night last winter. They droop but they perk back up when the weather improves, and, as stated above, often branch out with more shoots. By contrast when I grew them in GA, they took a severe beating with a lot of dieoff at 16-18. I think it is because the weather vacillates dramatically there in the winter....it was probably 75-80 a few days before the drop to 16, which doesn't happen here. Brassicas do the same thing....even cauliflower survived multiple hard freezes and went on to produce here whereas in GA it would have been long gone.....
 
Steve Flanagan
gardener
Posts: 324
Location: North Fork, CA. USDA Zone 9a, Heat Zone 8, 37 degrees North, Sunset 7/9, elevation 2600 feet
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Thanks, Alder.
And thank you everyone else.
I feel reassured.
 
Rosalind Riley
Posts: 70
Location: Kent, South-east England, UK
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Hi Steve

Writing from the UK where I understand Celsius better than Fahrenheit, but in my experience the greener and softer the growth on the beans the more susceptible they are. I've had beans survive through -10C/14F and others be wiped out. Once we had a long mild spell through November, December and early January. My flourishing 10" high broadies (we call them broad beans not favas) were cut down overnight in a -10C January night and never recovered. But a slow growth through early frosts and cold nights makes a much hardier plant, so I'm always glad when we have a cold spell after I've sowed.

This year we had a cold early December, many hard frosts and down to about -4C/25F but now it's mild and very very wet and not expected to freeze again before Christmas - here in S.E England. So even if it gets cold in January I hope the early cold toughened them up.

Season's Greetings!
 
Vladimir Horowitz
Posts: 23
Location: N. Idaho, zone 5
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Steve Flanagan wrote:Out of curiosity, Vladimir, what are the other plants in your top five survival plants lineup?

Potatoes, Jerusalem artichokes, winter squashes, and the brassica horde(mainly kales).

I live in a zone 5 short season climate, my choices would be different if was somewhere warmer....
 
Kyle Emory
Posts: 15
Location: Portland, OR
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We had an unusually harsh winter here along the Cascades with multiple snow and ice storms.  While there are some winters when I have a few fava plants that don't make it to see the light of spring, after being buried in snow for the better part of a week last winter, I was lucky to have this sole survivor out of the thirty or so plants I planted out in the fall.  If you look at the lower part of the plant, you will see where the branches died back, leaving the tips of the stems black.  I had lost all hope, but it seems that fava beans thankfully do occasionally resprout from the root zone after a severe winter.  I will definitely be saving the seeds to plant out and they will not be used in the kitchen!
FAVA.jpg
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Sole survivor from fall planted favas.
 
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