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Water catchment I was thinking about using big sheets of plastic to catch all the water I can

 
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And just lay them over the land and then have a bit of a slope to a collection spot. I'd probably have to go around and push some of it with some type of large Sedgie broom If land not sloped. Any issues with this idea?
Maybe mirco plastic pollutants or anything you guys can think of? Getting it in a container would be an issue I could pump it maybe create a pond. Idk
 
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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The Fish and Game Department around here makes wildlife watering stations, which are essentially a sloped canopy (tent), which drains into a holding tank. Simple, easy, and effective.
 
pollinator
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Location: Sierra Nevada Foothills, Zone 7b
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A friends family in Hawaii does that for all their water. A big tarp that drains into a pipe that fills an old doughboy pool. Not sure about the specifics for theirs but I just assume it's got a little slope to the tarp and drains into a little container with a pipe that in turn drains into the pool.

Oh, also I used to have a giant pushbroom-sized squeegie for pushing melting snow out of my garage in Alaska.
 
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Location: Richmond, VA, USA Zone 7b
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philip hernandez wrote:And just lay them over the land and then have a bit of a slope to a collection spot. I'd probably have to go around and push some of it with some type of large Sedgie broom If land not sloped. Any issues with this idea?
Maybe mirco plastic pollutants or anything you guys can think of? Getting it in a container would be an issue I could pump it maybe create a pond. Idk



I think you are right to have concerns about using plastic for many reasons. Short-term, it is probably less of a concern, but if it is out in the sun it will start to leach toxicity into your water. Ideally natural material is the way to go.

I'm no expert, but You might get more helpful advice if you can share your location or climate zone, and how much area you are using as the catchment and total area. Also telling us about your intended use for the water. Pictures are helpful too.
 
pollinator
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I'm considering something similar. I have a little drainage area near the house that drains about 2 acres or so, all on my land. The ditch along the county road channels anything from the road off in a different direction. I'm considering burying a tank in the middle of it and building a little dam just below. Then drill a bunch of holes in the top of the tank and cover it with that filter material made for aquariums. I though first of covering the ground with plastic or something but not sure it's necessary. We get downpours and a lot of water goes down that little draw. The amount of water I collect would only be limited by the size and number of tanks. I figure the grass would just act as a pre-filter, catching most of the big stuff. I'd have to filter or treat it again for drinking, I suppose, but it would be fine as is for everything else.
 
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Given our crazy -- and highly localized -- drought last year, I too am inclined to start collecting water off our hills (and assorted shed roofs, and ... you name it). I prefer places where I can gravity flow to gardens and trees.

FWIW, I use the heavy 8-mil clear poly that is rated for vapour barrier in house construction. My experience is that it lasts for about 10 years in the sun for micro greenhouses and additional years for rough coverings on woodpiles. The thin stuff is rubbish -- instant landfill.
 
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