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Soil levels show high phosphrous and high pH, what to do!

 
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I am working on Maui at a small produce farm. We have caly volcanic soils that is extremely compact. We also have 4x the recommended amount of phosphorus in the soil, and a pH of 7.5. The previous farmer added limestone a few years back which I think is responsible for the high PH. The high pospherous is theorized to be due to excessive use of manure compost being added to the garden.    Any thoughts on how to lower the phosphorous and pH number. We are apprehensive to continue any onsite composting at all, in fear that we will perpetuate the issue by recycling plant matter from our own garden that is high is phosphorous.  What would you do???
 
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How are things growing?

What grows well with excess phosphorous? Grow it. Export it. The problem should theoretically correct itself. Or rather, the problem is the solution?

Edit: I'll try to be more helpful!

This link says aloe, begonias, and some other flower and house plants enjoy them. Maybe you could grow and export these as product?
https://www.growertoday.com/plants-that-like-high-phosphorus/



 
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As an organic additive have you thought of using feather meal at all? Most organic farms, end up with to much P, this is due to the expensive cost of feather meal being non economical, therefore the repeated use of manure, giving that end result. Another option with minimal P is alfalfa pellets 2-.25-2. Not to mention there are cheap synthetic fertilizers, the main N one available lowering ph, that don’t contain P. My first plot I ever gardened, about half of it received to much P, it was easy to tell, by the way the corn grew stunted, I’ve been wary of phosphorous ever since. Another thought is coffee grounds are free, i stunted another patch of corn, by pouring out coffee grounds all over, but for you it may remediate the issue.
 
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What is the natural pH for unimproved soils in your area? I always thought volcanic soils tended toward acidic.

This resource from the University of Hawaii discusses soils on Maui:
https://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/MauiSoil/b_andisol.aspx

 
pollinator
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Hi Taylor,
I'm not a soil scientist, nor am I an expert, so take these with a grain of salt :)

Many issues with soil being high in one particular element can be mitigated by bringing up the other elements to balance it out. I know the first reaction is to lower the phospherous... but if the nitrogen and potassium were equally high and balanced, I doubt it would be as much of a problem.

Specific to the PH, you might look into using some sulfer. Sulfur is one of the most effective and long term ways to acidify soil.

Lastly, I would absolutely continue making and using compost. I would also add worm castings, biochar, and any other things that will help boost the micro-organisms in the soil. A healthy living soil can help balance things out naturally.

 
Adam Hackenberg
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*I redact my statement about use of coffee grounds, and support the decision of adding sulfur. In use with correlation from a soil sample test result, usually from local university, I’m somewhat guessing this intel is from that sort of things. Use their recommendations as far as ph goes, did you get recommendations with soil results? Pouring out coffee grounds by eye may result in similar output to current conditions, as it’s not really a scientific approach, to produce stable outcome.
 
Douglas Alpenstock
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In case of TL/DR, the link I posted earlier states:

"Fertility: When not highly weathered, volcanic soils are typically very fertile soils. However, volcanic soils form strong complexes with phosphorus. When poorly managed, phosphorus can be limiting. Additionally, the amorphous minerals that dominate volcanic soil can generate an anion exchange capacity (AEC) when under acidic conditions and depleted in organic matter. Fertility problems may be corrected with additions of organic matter, lime and/or fertilizer amendments."

 
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