• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Nancy Reading
  • r ranson
  • Jay Angler
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Leigh Tate
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Christopher Weeks
  • Timothy Norton
gardeners:
  • Jeremy VanGelder
  • Paul Fookes
  • Tina Wolf

Handy Garden Tips

 
steward
Posts: 14979
Location: USDA Zone 8a
4121
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Handy garden tips, do you have some?

Wash Veggies

source

Eggshells

source

Rock Strawberries

source

Ants

source
 
Anne Miller
steward
Posts: 14979
Location: USDA Zone 8a
4121
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here are some more garden tips I found on Pinterest:

Plants seeds dir transplants in eggshells:


source

Make a mini-greenhouse:


source

Use Baking soda to lower acidity:


source

Make a planter self-watering


source
 
Posts: 10
Location: Wyoming Zone 4b 6000' elevation
1
2
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
According to Robert Pavlis, scientist/gardener, and author of Garden Myths, "Eggshells do not keep slugs away", and "In most situations, eggshells add no value to the garden. The exception might be finely ground eggshells (down to 60 mesh) added to acidic soil. They don't harm the garden, so if it makes you feel good, go ahead and add them to the compost pile."

"You might be thinking that Blossom End Rot is a calcium deficiency, but that is not correct. The rest of the plant can have lots of calcium, and Blossom End Rot can still develop. More recently, scientists have had a closer look and found that the problem is one of moving calcium around inside the plant, not necessarily a shortage."
 
Posts: 100
Location: north okanagan
21
2
trees chicken cooking medical herbs woodworking composting
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

"You might be thinking that Blossom End Rot is a calcium deficiency, but that is not correct. The rest of the plant can have lots of calcium, and Blossom End Rot can still develop. More recently, scientists have had a closer look and found that the problem is one of moving calcium around inside the plant, not necessarily a shortage."



well don't leave us hanging christina, how do we get the calcium flowing through the plant? happy face on my tomatoes getting their calcium

or anyone else can answer that  knows, would love to not have blossom end rot in my tomatoes.

cheers    james
 
Posts: 256
60
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Christina Pearson wrote:
Regarding  Robert Pavlis, I really like his findings. Especially since he "digs deep" backing up his writing with scientific findings, and debunks many myths (on YT too)  

 
Ela La Salle
Posts: 256
60
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

james cox wrote:

   james


Hi
If I may chime it, have a look here, and you might find interesting explanations on eggs shells and many other gardening subjects (curtesy of Robert Pavlis)  

https://www.gardenmyths.com/tag/eggshells/

 
Posts: 83
Location: Adelaide, Australia
52
homeschooling kids home care books urban chicken bike fiber arts writing ungarbage
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I usually crush eggshells and throw back to the chickens so they can maintain their calcium levels. They don’t last long in the pen.

Strawberry rocks seemed to work on the birds this year, but sadly had no effect on the mice.

Speaking of mice, though - a good, cheap, everything-else safe bait can be made by mixing equal parts of flour, sugar, and bicarbonate of soda together. Leave out on plates or in containers where there’s rodent activity. Corners of sheds tend to be a good spot.

The sugar and flour attract them and disguise the taste of the soda, which is what kills them. It’s safe for pretty much anything that isn’t a rat or a mouse - we use it so we don’t poison the blue-tongue lizards in the backyard.
 
master steward
Posts: 7966
Location: Missouri Ozarks
4197
6
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Phoenix Blackdove wrote:I usually crush eggshells and throw back to the chickens so they can maintain their calcium levels. They don’t last long in the pen.

Strawberry rocks seemed to work on the birds this year, but sadly had no effect on the mice.

Speaking of mice, though - a good, cheap, everything-else safe bait can be made by mixing equal parts of flour, sugar, and bicarbonate of soda together. Leave out on plates or in containers where there’s rodent activity. Corners of sheds tend to be a good spot.

The sugar and flour attract them and disguise the taste of the soda, which is what kills them. It’s safe for pretty much anything that isn’t a rat or a mouse - we use it so we don’t poison the blue-tongue lizards in the backyard.



I also crush the dried eggshells to give back to the chickens, as well as powdering some, to add to the raw dog food I make for Charlie. Last year was the first, since we've been here, that we didn't have mice invade, under the hood of the car and expensively damage it. Last fall, we put raw coffee beans around, in the corners of the garage, and a couple bars of Irish Spring(original) soap inside the car, and 1 under the hood.

While the egg shells may not benefit the garden, via its minerals, it does seem to help in the way sand would - by breaking up the compaction of the hard clay, allowing more oxygen in, and more water water to move through.
 
Ela La Salle
Posts: 256
60
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
For a mice trap, I watched this video (it's a short one) using peanut oil.  
Perhaps someone might find it useful.

https://youtu.be/BxxFNkNf6q8
 
pollinator
Posts: 225
85
  • Likes 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

james cox wrote:

"You might be thinking that Blossom End Rot is a calcium deficiency, but that is not correct. The rest of the plant can have lots of calcium, and Blossom End Rot can still develop. More recently, scientists have had a closer look and found that the problem is one of moving calcium around inside the plant, not necessarily a shortage."



well don't leave us hanging christina, how do we get the calcium flowing through the plant? happy face on my tomatoes getting their calcium

or anyone else can answer that  knows, would love to not have blossom end rot in my tomatoes.

cheers    james



I've heard of epsom salts being recommended to prevent blossom end rot. The idea, I believe, is that the magnesium helps the plants move calcium around in the plants, as it is supposed to do in the human body as well. A quick Google search is a bit confusing though. One source says that too much magnesium can actually block the absorption of calcium by the plant.

Probably, as with most things, a rich, living soil is your best defense against blossom end rot. That always seems to be the best bet for covering all bases so plants have what they need, and the ability to uptake it.
 
james cox
Posts: 100
Location: north okanagan
21
2
trees chicken cooking medical herbs woodworking composting
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Ela La Salle wrote:

james cox wrote:

   james


Hi
If I may chime it, have a look here, and you might find interesting explanations on eggs shells and many other gardening subjects (curtesy of Robert Pavlis)  

https://www.gardenmyths.com/tag/eggshells/



hi ela
i read soil science a couple of years back. you have complicated my life by reminding me of this book because now i have to read it again. thanks for that.

one of the things about scientists, for me is that they need empirical data from controlled experiments etc, etc. not to disparage their work, but often if they can't see it, it doesn't exist. over the years they say one thing then reverse what they think because some "new" thing has come to light, really it was there all the time. the understanding of soil has really grown and so much information has come to light that has helped us(read me) not so bright folks do much better at building soil because of scientists, so i don't just write them off. however, i am into the placebo effect and faith. that is, just because i can't see it doesn't mean it's not real. for years doctors have old us that vitamins have no benefit, that is why i'm into the placebo effect. the first ever year i grew tomatoes with basil all around and gave them to my wife she said these taste basilly and they were the most flavorful tomatoes. so faith. no way to prove that basil helped. could have been a fluke or something totally unrelated. dirt, weather, water. who knows?

i can't remember if it is this book or another but, i think it had a bunch of info on how to make different compost teas. eggshells in acv was one and then dilute and spray or add to soil. i think the idea was to leach the calcium out of the shells. darn, now i have to find that book and read it again to brush up, if it's not in soil science. i think the shells just take a long time to deliver but, that is soil building. cuz if chickens digest and benefit from the shells then soil will to if given the chance and maybe some other nutrient to help with the breakdown into useful ions. or maybe the worms will transform it for me.

at any rate, i appreciate the "chime it".

still waiting to hear how to get the calcium moving around in my plants or maybe i will find it in soil science.

cheers   james

 
james cox
Posts: 100
Location: north okanagan
21
2
trees chicken cooking medical herbs woodworking composting
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
hey lila
you are the second person to suggest epsom salts. not just for blossom end rot though. do 2 make a quorum? i will give it a go.
thanks
 
Ela La Salle
Posts: 256
60
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

james cox wrote:

Hi James, I agree with you to a point LOL

Perhaps you might find this (short) explanation  from   I am Organic Gardening   on calcium intake in tomatoes interesting?  (mentions Epson salts, fish  etc, )
He's good at backing hi findings with updated science

https://youtu.be/VNa_6CbTrRU


Also, his visual explanation how to build healthy soil (the easiest to understand and to retain information for me). This might be quicker then looking for that book

https://youtu.be/lu-yIZOBar8 )


I am going to try growing things this man's way this year, including potatoes in cardboard box

 
Christina Pearson
Posts: 10
Location: Wyoming Zone 4b 6000' elevation
1
2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Regarding James Cox's comment: "well don't leave us hanging christina, how do we get the calcium flowing through the plant?  happy face on my tomatoes getting their calcium

or anyone else can answer that  knows, would love to not have blossom end rot in my tomatoes."


The answer from me is, I don't know!
I try to be more regular in my watering routine and last year I planted a variety of tomato that was advertised at blossom rot resistant, and indeed, it seemed to be.
 
Anne Miller
steward
Posts: 14979
Location: USDA Zone 8a
4121
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks, everyone for all the handy garden tips!

Regarding the calcium, I know watering with water with added crushed egg shells helps.

I found this article that talks about signs of a deficiency and ways to add calcium:

https://www.thespruce.com/adding-calcium-to-soil-4773599
 
gardener
Posts: 1623
Location: N. California
737
2
hugelkultur kids cat dog fungi trees books chicken cooking medical herbs ungarbage
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I read, and don't remember the source, so take it as you will. I read it's very uncommon for most soil , especially clay soil to be deficient in calcium.  That blossom end rot has more to do with watering. To much water leaches the calcium, and not enough water the plants are unable to absorb it.  I don't know if this is true or not, but it makes sense to me.  I actually got blossom end rot on my tomatoes for the first time this year.  We have so much calcium in our well water, I could not understand how I could have a calcium deficiency.  On the other hand I'm not a very consistent person, so I don't water at regular intervals.  
Every year I get blossom end rot on my bell pepper, but never any other peppers, or purple bell, for some reason.  Also making me feel it's not a lack of calcium, when the tomato next to the pepper is fine.
Makes me think I need to put ollia next to my peppers and tomatoes.  I will have to try it next year.
 
Anne Miller
steward
Posts: 14979
Location: USDA Zone 8a
4121
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here are some neat ideas I found in this older thread about verticle gardens:









https://permies.com/t/2101/permaculture/Vertical-Gardening
 
I met your mom on a Carribean cruise and she said you would help me and this tiny ad:
100th Issue of Permaculture Magazine - now FREE for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/45/pmag
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic