• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
stewards:
  • Mike Haasl
  • paul wheaton
  • Dave Burton
master gardeners:
  • John F Dean
  • jordan barton
  • Carla Burke
  • Leigh Tate
gardeners:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
  • Jay Angler

Monthly Food Forest Tours! Let's create a food forest together!

 
gardener
Posts: 2370
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
868
forest garden fish trees foraging books earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Turning a grafted apple tree into an own root fruit tree.
20210313_125217.jpg
Grafted apple tree sending out its own roots above the graft
Grafted apple tree sending out its own roots above the graft
 
pollinator
Posts: 207
Location: Eilean a' Cheo
63
transportation dog forest garden foraging trees books food preservation woodworking wood heat rocket stoves ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Steve :

  Turning a grafted apple tree into an own root fruit tree.



This is very interesting Steve!  Can I ask you how you encourages roots to grow like that?  My fruit trees struggle here and it's very difficult to get own root trees, which I'm expecting wouod be a bit more vigorous. Thanks.
 
Steve Thorn
gardener
Posts: 2370
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
868
forest garden fish trees foraging books earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
For this one I just buried the graft a few inches below the soil. I've taken a knife and cut the bark and cambium layer off of some older trees and think that it probably works better like that, but I haven't dug those up to see for sure. I remove a section about 1 centimeter by 5 centimeters and then bury it a few inches under the soil.

Yeah Nancy I totally recommend it for increasing the vigor and health of the trees. For the ones I've done this on so far, they seem to be generally healthier and tougher overall. I think these trees will also live longer and hopefully still be there for future generations to enjoy!

Would love to see how yours turn out if you make some!
 
Nancy Reading
pollinator
Posts: 207
Location: Eilean a' Cheo
63
transportation dog forest garden foraging trees books food preservation woodworking wood heat rocket stoves ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My apple trees are mostly on M25 rootstock (the most vigorous I could find).  I have one on it's own root which did better to start with and then seems to have slowed down.  I planted them all in made up land in what should be a more sheltered bit.  My bedrock is only a foot or so down, but I build up the soil there so these have at least double that.  All the apple trees are pretty small still (aboit 5ft after 5(?) Years).  We are an extreme climate here for top fruit.
I'm wondering whether to be brave and cut the grafted trunk right down.  Assuming they survive this, they would grow more lke a shrub with low branches, then If I bury them again I may get the branches to root like yours have and get several trees.  Either that or the tree will die altogether and I'll have to try again!
I'm just trying some grafting again this year.  I have some scion wood from a local tree that had to be cut back due to disease but fruited pretty well.  If I have enough seedling stock I could see if I can graft my main trees as well as insurance.....
 
Steve Thorn
gardener
Posts: 2370
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
868
forest garden fish trees foraging books earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Giant pokeweed roots
20210314_162411.jpg
Giant pokeweed roots
Giant pokeweed roots
 
Steve Thorn
gardener
Posts: 2370
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
868
forest garden fish trees foraging books earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The year before last, my oldest plum tree had a bumper crop of plums. A squirrel or some other critter was also enjoying a few of the plums, and dropped the seeds to the ground beneath the tree after eating some plums.

I noticed the numerous plum seeds on the ground as I was walking by, and quickly gathered up as many as I could find. I was working on another project that day that I was trying to finish up, so instead of diligently planting the plum seeds, I think I remember using a shovel to break up the soil in a nearby spot, and I may have made a slightly raised area. I pushed the seeds into the soil with my thumb, about an inch down, pressed the soil firmly on top of them, and may have covered it with a very light mulch. I may have spent ten minutes collecting and planting the seeds.

I was walking by this spot the other day, almost two years later, and had completely forgotten about the plum seeds that I had planted here previously. The area is now filled with numerous wild plants, and I was looking at another tree that I had planted nearby, when I noticed what looked like a patch of small trees growing. Upon looking closer, there leaves were just coming out, and I noticed that they looked like little plum trees. My mind flashed back to the memory almost two years ago, when I had planted the plum seeds here. There are about thirty plum seedlings growing in this area all close together. It's hard to beat getting about 30 plum seedlings with about 10 minutes of work.

Sometimes it's nice to be just plum surprised.
20210315_122911.jpg
One year old plum trees starting to leaf out
One year old plum trees starting to leaf out
20210315_122756.jpg
Lots of plum seedlings growing close together
Lots of plum seedlings growing close together
20210315_123158.jpg
More plums growing with a lot of other different plants
More plums growing with a lot of other different plants
 
Steve Thorn
gardener
Posts: 2370
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
868
forest garden fish trees foraging books earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My black locust hardwood cuttings are leafing out, hope they make it!
20210320_160843.jpg
Black locust hardwood cutting leafing out
Black locust hardwood cutting leafing out
 
Steve Thorn
gardener
Posts: 2370
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
868
forest garden fish trees foraging books earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is the parent tree of my plum seedlings.

It is worth growing just for its blooming fragrance alone.
20210321_105138.jpg
Fragrant parent plum tree
Fragrant parent plum tree
20210321_105226.jpg
Plum flowers in full bloom
Plum flowers in full bloom
20210321_105222.jpg
More plum flowers
More plum flowers
20210321_105205.jpg
Plum branches filled with flowers
Plum branches filled with flowers
 
Steve Thorn
gardener
Posts: 2370
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
868
forest garden fish trees foraging books earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cherry buds are about to break!
20210321_171634.jpg
Cherry bud cluster
Cherry bud cluster
20210321_171755.jpg
Lots of cherry buds
Lots of cherry buds
20210321_171716.jpg
Cherry bud clusters
Cherry bud clusters
 
Steve Thorn
gardener
Posts: 2370
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
868
forest garden fish trees foraging books earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Pear seedlings sprouting!
20210325_072521.jpg
Pear seedling emerging
Pear seedling emerging
20210325_072541.jpg
Pear seedling with a small sprout
Pear seedling with a small sprout
20210325_072359.jpg
Pear seedling sprouting amongst a leaf and lots of stems
Pear seedling sprouting amongst a leaf and lots of stems
20210325_072641.jpg
Wow, I can really see how sandy the soil is close up
Wow, I can really see how sandy the soil is close up
 
God is a comedian playing for an audience that is afraid to laugh - Voltair. tiny ad:
Rocket Oven – is it Right for You? Here’s What You Need to Know
https://permies.com/t/99726/rocket-ovens/Introduction-rocket-ovens-build
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic