• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Nancy Reading
  • r ranson
  • Jay Angler
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • Leigh Tate
  • paul wheaton
  • Nicole Alderman
master gardeners:
  • Timothy Norton
  • Christopher Weeks
gardeners:
  • Saana Jalimauchi
  • Jeremy VanGelder
  • Ulla Bisgaard

Cover Crop: Mung Bean

 
master gardener
Posts: 3185
Location: Upstate NY, Zone 5, 43 inch Avg. Rainfall
1223
monies home care dog fungi trees chicken food preservation cooking building composting homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator


What are Mung beans?

Mung beans are defined by Merriam-Webster as "an erect bushy annual bean (Vigna radiata synonym Phaseolus aureus) that is widely cultivated in warm regions for its edible usually green or yellow seeds, for forage, and as the chief source of bean sprouts" (Source) Mung beans are said to reach maturity in roughly 60 days. I would consider this a short season crop. Mung beans are reported to be heat and drought tolerant.

What kind of Cover Crop are they?

Mung beans are a legume. They are said to have the ability to fix nitrogen with the mutualistic relationship it has with certain types of bacteria. Mung beans also create a fair amount of biomass that can be incorporated into soil to increase organic matter.

What is the ideal growing conditions?

Mung beans do best in hot humid weather. They do best between 80 degrees Fahrenheit and 90 degrees Fahrenheit. Mung beans do best in loamy to sandy loamy soils with good drainage.


Have you grown Mung beans? Have you used them as a cover crop? I'd love to hear everyone's experiences.  

 
master gardener
Posts: 2473
Location: Carlton County, Minnesota, USA: 3b; Dfb; sandy loam; in the woods
1209
6
forest garden trees chicken food preservation cooking fiber arts woodworking homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've only grown mung beans into sprouts for eating as such. I'm interested to know how they do for you.
 
Posts: 56
11
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I planted some rows of them as a bean crop and they did great here in southern Indiana.
 
Timothy Norton
master gardener
Posts: 3185
Location: Upstate NY, Zone 5, 43 inch Avg. Rainfall
1223
monies home care dog fungi trees chicken food preservation cooking building composting homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have previously only heard of the bean. I stumbled on the fact that it is a decent warm season legume which I plant to sub in where I would utilize peas for the cool season. I have an opportunity with a strip of soil that needs a root put into it so I figured an experiment was in order.

I haven't heard anyone grow Mung beans before in New York, so I'm going to give it a rip. I read that the seed pods do not split on the plant when coming to maturity. Not that I am worried about volunteers next year, but it makes harvesting my own future seed potentially easier.
 
gardener
Posts: 3792
Location: South of Capricorn
1975
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
they seem to take pretty easily- we sprout them to eat and any that get thrown in the compost or to the rabbits and somehow touch dirt seem to take off like rockets.
I think for chop and drop or green manure they are great. if you're growing to eat, maybe try some first (in the form you'll be able to make them, since often they're out there dehulled, which I personally can't do at home)- they are not your typical bean, I'm not really sure how to describe it, the only kind of bean my otherwise bean-loving family will not touch, period.
I look forward to seeing how they do in NY-- to eat as a pea substitute I think I'd recommend something like cowpea (which, when eaten green, is lovely), but i'm not sure how they'd do in that zone.
 
Good things happen to those who hustle --Anaïs Nin ... feel the hustle of this tiny ad!
100th Issue of Permaculture Magazine - now FREE for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/45/pmag
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic