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venison recipes?  RSS feed

 
charles c. johnson
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i have an 8 pound butt roast . any cooking / spice suggestions ??
 
Leah Sattler
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I would  dump a can of tomato soup over it and cook it in the slow cooker on the 10 hour cycle. the acid tomatoes will help to tenderize it and the soup is already seasoned. I use either homemade or 'amys organic'. a can of tomatoes works great too but I would add some, garlic, pepper, salt and onion if were to use plain tomatoes. I have pretty simple tastes though. that is my standby for cooking goat roast.  I usually make a gravy out of any juice left in the cooker and serve with rice or mashed yukon gold potatoes.
 
Jami McBride
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books chicken duck food preservation forest garden hugelkultur trees
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If you have a cheap red wine or beer you can marinate the roast in the fridge for a couple of days.  Cover your roast half way in the wine, after a day roll the roast and get the other side.  This process tenterises your meat and flavors it.

Add the roast + wine to your slow cooker and a cup of worcestershire.  Cook on low for 6 - 8 hours, until done.  This makes a really great flavor roast and gravy, or save the drippings to add to your next pot of beans or lentils for that good meaty flavor.  The hungry ones in your family will start requesting your lentils as much as they do your roast.

And my favorite rib recipe also marinates in red-wine + brown sugar and worcestershire - these flavors are soooo good - yum! I add extra brown sugar when finishing the glazing in the oven.

I never thought about tomatoes, what a great idea Leah, I'm going to try that.

 
charles c. johnson
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yum bolth side really good. last time i made deer roast it was sooooooooooo tough
 
charles c. johnson
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I didn't have any wine/beer or tomato soup. So  I used tomato basil paste i made this summer. soaked for 24 hours cooked for 12. It was great! thanks for the help
 
Ken Peavey
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I made a stew out of a deer shoulder a few years back.  Made it the same way as I would  beef stew.  As I recall, it came out some elegant.
 
                          
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Location: Marrakai Northern Territory Australia
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I like bambi on spit, citris marinade
 
Ken Peavey
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Would that be vealison?
 
                          
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Location: Marrakai Northern Territory Australia
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not sure what breed of deer in Australia, it's not native but it is good eating
 
Jami McBride
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Also for Saint Patty's Day I cook corned beef in beer (seems like the right thing to do) with cabbage - it is really good!
 
                    
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Age it! Wrap it up in a sheet and string (three layers of sheet - you're keeping flies out) and hang it somewhere kinda drafty and coolish for a few weeks.  Unwrap it, use a sharp knife to slice off the very thin outer moldy layer, THEN cook it any dang way you want.  Slow and long is good.  It'll be delicious. 
 
                    
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Or soak the whole thing in brine or wine or beer or yogurt or some combination of the above.  Enough to get the whole thing submerged.  After a week or so in the fridge, discard the liquid (the wasteful part of marinading....I prefer the dry-aged stuff anyway) and cook it slow and long. 
 
charles c. johnson
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soundlike good tips
 
                          
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Location: Northern California
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Some friends found a deer (right after an unhappy automobile accident) and brined it in five gallon buckets without refrigeration. They made some chili out of it really soon after they brined it, and I had some of that--the meat was flavorful but tough, a little muskier than I like. That was late October.

This NYE they brought some of the same deer (still brined, still no refrigeration) to a party I went to, and I tried it again, and it was meltingly tender and not at all musky. I don't know how much of that is the brining and how much is just that they cooked it differently, but it was pretty excellent--I'm persuaded to look into brining meat for preservation. Especially if I find any fresh deer.
 
                    
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Kerrick, that tenderness is completely due to the brine - it's the action of microbes digesting the meat a bit.  The brine limits the microbes to those that like salty, wet, low oxygen environments and so there's no moldy bits to cut off as with dry aging. 

Our deer aging experience started with our truck and a deer meeting in a sudden and tragic way also.  You know that throwing road kill in your car is considered poaching?  That's incredible to me. 

I grew up eating deer and elk, but my family didn't age the meat.  I thought it was supposed to taste gamey.  That's just excess blood in the meat, I've been told.  The aged roasts we ate weren't gamey in the slightest. 
 
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