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Mulberries in zone 3ish?  RSS feed

 
Posts: 15
Location: Saskatoon Canada, zone 2b
bee greening the desert trees
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Does anyone grow mulberries in really cold zones? I'm looking for a northern seed source of any kind of mulberry. I know of a single specimen here in Saskatoon, but have never seen any fruit on it, probably a male and lonely. I remember seeing one in Morden manitoba many moons ago, but have no contacts out that way... I'd be willing to try something from Montana or North Dakota, perhaps we could exchange some seed? I have some hardier stuff to trade...Thanks all!
Koren
 
Posts: 123
Location: West Iowa
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Northrop mulberry is said to be cold hardy in zone 3, though probably not available in Canada.
 
Posts: 93
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Would love to find a mulberry as well. Am from south central SK, Zone 3(possibly trending to 4). North central Minnesota would also be a potential area to receive seed from.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1462
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
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Chicago Illinois - not sure if that is 'north' enough. Gets pretty cold there, that is why I left. But weeping mulberries are very common there.
 
Koren Vangool
Posts: 15
Location: Saskatoon Canada, zone 2b
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Thanks for the replies! I will do a search tonight for seed of that speices and see what I can come up with. Sounds like these could be a solid zone 4 for sure. I bet one of the bigger nurseries in Winnipeg might carry larger trees possibly.

Denis - Maybe we could do a trade if you have/want some permaculturesque material? Are you on a farm or in town? I have a bag of Manchurian Walnuts that needs to get in the ground, as well as some sugar maple, both from Saskatoon trees. I have some different stuff, if there's anything you're looking for! I'm always looking!
Koren
 
Denis Huel
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Sent a PM Koren.
 
Posts: 2
Location: Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
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Hi Denis and Koren,
I am in Regina. I have been reading about Permaculture for a few years now. I am now on an online course with Geoff Lawton. I am interested in knowing more about your Mulberry trees. Have they given fruit? What have you used them for? How long does it take them to bear fruit.
I am a beekeeper for the past 6 years. I am willing to make exchanges of honey for seeds! I am in Saskatoon for meetings on occasion and would like to see your yards if you are urban based.
Thanks!

wybo
 
Koren Vangool
Posts: 15
Location: Saskatoon Canada, zone 2b
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Hi Wybo,
I hope you're enjoying the online PDC!  My partner took it a few years ago and it was really good, I bet it's even better now
We are also members of the bee club as we had a swarm move into some used bee equipment we had in a shed.  This is our second time overwintering them and we have 3 colonies now.  Maybe next time you come in for a meeting you could let us know and we could meet beforehand for a visit.  I don't have any mulberries yet, I have seed on order but that's about it.  We do have some Black locust that's getting established and are excited for that to start flowering as it's a real good bee tree.  We also discovered sainfoin (a hardy perennial legume for dry sandy places) that bees ADORE and can really pump out nectar.  We also grow lots of borage, buckwheat and this year are planting tons of phacelia tenacetifolia.  We are starting a permaculture cutflower farm, our bees should be happy about that (if they're still alive after this extreme cold snap!).  TTYS!  Koren
 
Posts: 134
Location: Zone 4b at 1000m, post glacial soil...British Columbia
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I PM'ed you with a sapling source, Koren.
 
Wybo Ottenbreit-Born
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Location: Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
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Denis, Could you pm me the source as well?
Thanks!
wybo
 
Denis Huel
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I never did get a mulberry tree. I read about a variety that was selected in North Dakota called the "Trader" mulberry.  It probably was Morus alba var tatarica. Likely can't get it Canada but if you find a source let me know. I'm tempted to buy an "Illinois Everbearing" from Grimo Nut Nursery. I believe this variety is a Morus rubra x Morus alba hybrid.

I live 80 km SW of Moose Jaw and am likely a little bit warmer than you. Very interested in bees but have too many projects on the go at the moment. I am experimenting with a variety of tree crops on a little bit larger scale and a kind of a tree seed nut. Feel free to contact me with questions about trees and shrubs and I will do my best to help you. Take care.
 
Regan Dixon
Posts: 134
Location: Zone 4b at 1000m, post glacial soil...British Columbia
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Morus alba tatarica is offered at http://treeeaternursery.com/tree-eater-nursery/
 
Posts: 11
bee forest garden homestead
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Koren Vangool wrote:Thanks for the replies!  I will do a search tonight for seed of that speices and see what I can come up with.  Sounds like these could be a solid zone 4 for sure.  I bet one of the bigger nurseries in Winnipeg might carry larger trees possibly.

Denis - Maybe we could do a trade if you have/want some permaculturesque material?  Are you on a farm or in town?   I have a bag of Manchurian Walnuts that needs to get in the ground, as well as some sugar maple, both from Saskatoon trees.  I have some different stuff, if there's anything you're looking for!  I'm always looking!
Koren


What kind of stuff do you have, specifically nuts or fruit?
 
A Crossman
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Denis Huel wrote:I never did get a mulberry tree. I read about a variety that was selected in North Dakota called the "Trader" mulberry.  It probably was Morus alba var tatarica. Likely can't get it Canada but if you find a source let me know. I'm tempted to buy an "Illinois Everbearing" from Grimo Nut Nursery. I believe this variety is a Morus rubra x Morus alba hybrid.

I live 80 km SW of Moose Jaw and am likely a little bit warmer than you. Very interested in bees but have too many projects on the go at the moment. I am experimenting with a variety of tree crops on a little bit larger scale and a kind of a tree seed nut. Feel free to contact me with questions about trees and shrubs and I will do my best to help you. Take care.


What kind of tree crops do you have? I am growing trees and am getting a tree seed order in the next few weeks.
 
Denis Huel
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A Crossman wrote:

Denis Huel wrote:I never did get a mulberry tree. I read about a variety that was selected in North Dakota called the "Trader" mulberry.  It probably was Morus alba var tatarica. Likely can't get it Canada but if you find a source let me know. I'm tempted to buy an "Illinois Everbearing" from Grimo Nut Nursery. I believe this variety is a Morus rubra x Morus alba hybrid.

I live 80 km SW of Moose Jaw and am likely a little bit warmer than you. Very interested in bees but have too many projects on the go at the moment. I am experimenting with a variety of tree crops on a little bit larger scale and a kind of a tree seed nut. Feel free to contact me with questions about trees and shrubs and I will do my best to help you. Take care.


What kind of tree crops do you have? I am growing trees and am getting a tree seed order in the next few weeks.



Tried quite few types, but most of my trees are extremely young. Weather has been extremely difficult here the past year, driest on record (130 yrs) and wildly fluctuating temperatures, including some very damaging growing season frosts in 2017. Along with the deer my plantings received an tremendous amount of damage over the last 12 months. I think climate change is going make life very challenging in my area.

I have several hundred black walnuts from hardy seed sources (seed source is extremely important if you are in a marginal area). I am quite impressed with black walnut's toughness and am optimistic I will have some success with it. Have butternuts as well and although they don't seem as tough as the b.walnuts they are still promising. Have shagbark hickories that have survived one winter so far. Yellowhorn has also survived a winter. Bur oak is ironclad. Have seedlings of three hybrid hazelnut sources. They don't seem to like my heat and drought but I am not giving up on them yet. American chestnut was a bust.

Nut pines, I have Siberian(P.sibirica), Korean(P.koraiensis), Limber(P.flexilis), and Pinyon(P.edulis). Pinyon pine may seem a stretch but Natural Resources Canada has a plant hardiness site where they run species adaptions through various climate change models and some predict southern Saskatchewan and Alberta as the core area of climate suitability for P.edulis by mid century. Unfortunately deer ate many of my Siberian and Limber pines this fall.

Honeylocust seems OK in my area. Manchurian apricot fruits well occasionally, many apples, have some seedling pears with poor quality fruit but very tough plants. Saskatoons. Ponderosa pine is very good. I do like the North Plateau strain better than the Black Hills type for variety of reasons. Red pine which is never planted here seems to be doing very well. Not so fond of Siberian Larch. Would like to try Douglas fir.

When buying seed of trees, seed source or locality can be critical for some species.

Where are you from?
 
A Crossman
Posts: 11
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north of Prince Albert. I have been buying wholesale whips (fruit, nut, and for pollinators) but have been growing some trees from seed. We have outgrown our current homestead so we are looking at moving further south in Saskatchewan. This year I will be buying a propagation greenhouse that I hope to hook up to solar at our new location. I will be getting an order of tree seeds from Ontario Tree Seed Plant (which is closing in August). Have you tried the black walnut from Select Seedling? I will also be getting butternut from Pine Needle Farms in Ontario. Have you tried anything from Nutcracker Nursery? My mulberry from Richters was about 6 inches tall and was not in good condition when I got it and didn't make it. I am thinking about ordering mulberry from either Grimo Nut (1-3 feet) or Nutcracker Nursery (4-5 feet). i am also hoping to trial some pawpaws in a polyculture this year depending on the move. I have some Hardy Chinese peach I am growing from seed that I got from a FB friend in Ontario. They finally germinated and are doing well.
 
Posts: 14
Location: Argyle, Manitoba, Canada Zone 3
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I am in Zone 3a, Interlake region of Manitoba.  I would love seeds and scion wood.  I have very little to offer in exchange, as I'm just beginning to seed bomb my property.  I have some cherries, josta berries, a crab apple, some blueberry and saskatoon plants.  Also have a great resource of native hazelnuts, but won't have seed until this August when I harvest (before the worms get at them!).  I really want to grow mulberries as well.  Any help would be appreciated.
 
Posts: 28
Location: Moorefield, Ontario, Canada
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Wiffletree Nursery has the Illinois Everbearing rated for zone 4. They are in Ontario They also carry many other cold hardy fruit species and ship to most of Canada. Here is a link.

https://www.whiffletreefarmandnursery.ca/about-us/
 
Posts: 31
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red mulberry is native to canada but only in southern ontario
because of siberian(white) mulberry being introduced here the native
reds are being cross bred out of existence
the only way to get a true red is to take cuttings from some of the older proven reds which started growing before the introduction of the siberian
there is an effort to re populate the reds in this manner
that said, the siberians are a couple zones more cold hardy
and the chances of pollenating a red from youre location are pretty slim
anyhow just thought i would throw that out there
mmmmmm   mulberry!

for anyone in southern ontario who is interested:
http://edibleforestfarms.ca/product-category/red-mulberry/
 
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https://www.greenbarnnursery.ca/products/illinois-everbearing-mulberry-black  ; here is a source for mulberries in Canada
 
Posts: 629
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
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Leona Dubois wrote:https://www.greenbarnnursery.ca/products/illinois-everbearing-mulberry-black   here is a source for mulberries in Canada



Link was broken. Here is the general berry page:
https://www.greenbarnnursery.ca/collections/berries
 
Nick Kitchener
Posts: 629
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
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Leona Dubois wrote:https://www.greenbarnnursery.ca/products/illinois-everbearing-mulberry-black   here is a source for mulberries in Canada



Link was broken. Here is the general berry page:
https://www.greenbarnnursery.ca/collections/berries
 
Posts: 117
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
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Ok, I am really upset. People always talk about with a tree will survive the winter in a given area but never about wither the growing season has enough heat to it to produce fruit. I live in zone 5a but we get the same amount of growing degree days, at base 5C, that places like fort hope and moose river in Ontario gets. And they are in zone 2b. Can someone tell me how I can find out what heat requirements various perennials need to set fruit? 
 
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