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Another LGD question...protection for family AND livestock

 
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Is this possible?
We are headed to our bare 20 acres in a few months to live in a fifth wheel with our two young children (3yrs and 1yr) until we build our cob/strawbale home next year or so... We will be bringing chickens, and want to get goats/sheep within the year. In the meantime we need protection for the children and I when we are there alone. Is it ok to get an LGD type dog BEFORE we have more than just the chickens for them to watch? I really want to have a dog that can protect me and the children AS WELL AS the livestock we will have. Protect against - black bears, mountain lions, coyotes, eagles/hawks, and any humans that shouldn't be coming around. Thoughts?
 
steward
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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I would think it is fine to get an LGD before the major livestock.
If he is already established when the lambs/kids arrive, he/she should take them as his 'kids'.

Just don't make the mistake of turning him into a house dog while he is waiting to become a LGD.
Once he is trained as a house dog, that's about all he will ever be good for.
He needs to know that his job is outdoors, rain or shine.

 
Natasha Bailey
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John Polk wrote:I would think it is fine to get an LGD before the major livestock.
If he is already established when the lambs/kids arrive, he/she should take them as his 'kids'.

Just don't make the mistake of turning him into a house dog while he is waiting to become a LGD.
Once he is trained as a house dog, that's about all he will ever be good for.
He needs to know that his job is outdoors, rain or shine.



TY John... any thoughts on breed?
 
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We have Akbash, very good with the children and they even watch the sky for predatory birds. We do have one "house dog", that guards the house and wrap around porch.
The Akbash needs to know very early who is the alpha, and that he/she is subordinate to the humans. Our dogs have even learned that the deer in the pasture are "safe",
and they no longer bark at them. The Akbash also do not have the matting hair problem problem of the Pyrenees etc.
We have also learned that if you are going to start with puppies, you need to keep them separated, as they will be easily distracted with play. We have 4 in the "yard" that protect
goats, geese, chickens, guinies as well.
 
pollinator
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Location: Vermont, off grid for 24 years!
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I have/had Great Pyrs, Maremmas, Pyr/Kuvatz. I'm keen on the big white dogs!
Maremmas have the smallest range (1 mile) and are least likely to wander too fa. Pyrs have a very large territory. They can all be tough to contain.

They work best in pairs. They will generally kill a chicken early on, by accident, not realizing their own strength.

Never had trouble with the LGDs and kids but an alpha could be a problem with adults.
 
pollinator
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I had to look that one up Randy.
Here is a link to the national association with lots of info on the akbash.
http://akbashclub.com/
 
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Location: Yamhill, Oregon
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Bobcats have been stealing chickens (including big roosters) every day or two at a couple of neighbors homesteads. We don't have the problem - we
have a LGD - one of the 'big white ones' - a Maremma. We haven't lost a chicken. I've learned that the 'big white ones' tend to stay close to the flock,
while other LGD breeds will pursue the predator. If a person has lots of acreage, numerous dogs would be best. One lone LGD is 'overworked' - on alert
day and night. With 2+ dogs, they have each others backs - one rests a bit, the other watches. This is an excellent overview of the need for various
breeds of LGD.

youtube
 
Cj Sloane
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Location: Vermont, off grid for 24 years!
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Pamela Kirsch wrote:I've learned that the 'big white ones' tend to stay close to the flock, while other LGD breeds will pursue the predator.


As mentioned above, Maremmas cover the smallest ground - 1 mile. Pyrs have a territory up to 15 miles (!) which is why they tend to disaPyr if not fenced in.
 
pollinator
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We had problems with dogs accepting new animals to the herd (TYPES of animals--like adding hogs when they grew up with goats). So it does have risks.

But a risk probably worth taking.
 
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Location: Hamilton Ontario
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I breed Argentinian Dogo Mastiffs. If you want an Amazing Family Dog that will kill anything that attacks but never turn on you or your children than this is the dog to go for. They also don't bark for "nothing" which is my favorite trait. My dogs bark, I know something's up!

The breed was started in 1929 from the Cordoba Fighting Dog (now extinct) for the purpose of being both a hunting dog And a companion. Several other breeds such as the Bull Terrier and Great Dane were selectively bred into this ultimate dog.

They look like 100lb white Pitt Bull. Can be trained to hunt Mountain Lions.

Any questions?

Seriously look into this breed. My girl won't be ready for a litter until next heat but there are other breeders online if you're interested.
 
Cj Sloane
pollinator
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Here's a safe way to do it:


Keep a fence between them for a while, till they get to know each other. Believe me, no predator was going after those little pigs with that dog so close!
 
Put a gun against his head, pulled my trigger, now he's dead, that tiny ad sure bled
2021 RMH Jamboree planning thread!
https://permies.com/wiki/148835/permaculture-projects/RMH-Jamboree-planning-thread
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