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Autumn Olive pollination?

 
Posts: 121
Location: Brighton, Michigan
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Hi, this is my first time posting. I am finding conflicting information regarding autumn olive (Elaganus umbellata) pollination, i.e. monacious or diecious. Most sources indicate that it is self fertile. I have thousands of bushes growing around me area but very few produce fruit. Any ideas to increase fruit production? Thanks in advance.
 
gardener
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Mine often didn't produce much the first couple of years. This was even when they had tons of blossoms. It could be a few factors. One is that the bees haven't found them yet (but they do smell really good). Another is that the plant is developing it's ability to really fruit. Usually gets flowers and say, one fruit on a fruit tree before it really powers up on an asymptotic increase. I wouldn't worry for the first couple of years. After 5 years or so, I might think about mineral balance of soil, ph, bees or something like that. You can always hand pollinate with a small child's artist paint brush if you're checking bees.
John S
PDX OR
 
Posts: 123
Location: West Iowa
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Is there a lot of shade?
 
Ray Moses
Posts: 121
Location: Brighton, Michigan
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No,
 
pollinator
Posts: 1003
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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I’m having the same problem except my trees are 6-7 years old. They’ve been blooming for several years but no fruit at all.  I thought they were getting frosted every year. This year I’m sure they didn’t get frosted. Still no fruit.
They are one of the named varieties from Oikos. I forgot which. I bought one and planted two cuttings from it. Do I need a pollinator? Two of them are near pecan trees. Could there be a juglone issue? They seem very healthy.




 
Posts: 66
Location: Western Kentucky - Zone 7
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forest garden woodworking
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I live in one of the two main states where they are invasive and fruit production isn't an issue here. Bumble and honey bees absolutely love autumn olive flowers. Since they fix nitrogen, it could be they simply don't have sufficient phosphorous or potassium. Also we have had wild 3 year old seedlings bear fruit here, and one of ours that is about 20 ft tall is about 300 ft or better from another autumn olive and it bears plenty of fruit.
 
Ken W Wilson
pollinator
Posts: 1003
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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Im not aware of any other autumn olives in this part of the state.  I see some honey bees. Not as many as there should be. I wonder if maybe the bees preferred one of my other fruit trees? My other trees seem to get plenty of P an K. Maybe I’m missing a trace mineral? I think our area is sometimes short on Magnesium.

I have a goumi that is about four years younger. It’s got its first few berries this year.

 
gardener
Posts: 689
Location: Western Washington
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I've been told bees love them. They're listed here as a honey plant
 
Posts: 327
Location: West Midlands UK (zone 8b) Rainfall 26"
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I've got an Eleagnus with tiny red fruits, not sure if it's the same species.  Anyway, I know it is capable of bearing fruit with no pollinator nearby, but the birds know it too.  Possibly your trees have more fruit than you think, at least initially?
 
Ken W Wilson
pollinator
Posts: 1003
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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Guess I better take a closer look. Yours are red already? My goumis are tiny green things.
 
James Landreth
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Posts: 689
Location: Western Washington
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They might be silverberries. They usually bloom in fall and ripen in spring (the ones Hester is referring to) Are they evergreen shrubs, Hester?
 
Hester Winterbourne
Posts: 327
Location: West Midlands UK (zone 8b) Rainfall 26"
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Ah no sorry, I didn't mean they are red already.  It's just about finished flowering now.
 
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