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Where can I find non-GMO foods?  RSS feed

 
Randy Gibson
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Dried beans first of all, we eat a lot of beans. (have you seen the prices lately)

Thank you, randy
 
Su Ba
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Outside of soybean, I don't think other beans are GMO. You could check out any natural food stores in your area that carry organic labelled food. If its certified organic, it's not GMO.
 
Randy Gibson
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Thank you, that is what I would have guessed, but it is very difficult to get GMO info.
 
Sheri Fogarty
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The main food that are genetically engineered (GMO) are corn, soy, canola, cotton, sugar beet and anything made with them (soy lecithin, corn oil, etc). Also a small amount of summer squash, Hawaiian papaya. I'd eat those foods, only organically. The others - so far thank goodness - are okay.

Sheri
www.MomsForSafeFood.org
 
David Livingston
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Where do you live Randy ?
 
Randy Gibson
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Kiamichi, Ok
 
alex sminter
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There's a website that has a huge database of non-gmo foods. It doesn't say where to buy them, but it will give you brands/products to look for in the store! About GMO
 
Judith Browning
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We eat a lot of beans, also and buy them in bulk and organic through what I think is called a buying club. It is Country Life Natural Foods. We order through the local 7th day adventist church who serve anyone in the community who wants to order. It looks as though Country Life's route is into Oklahoma, they are located in michigan, a lot of miles I know but maybe not as much travel as some foods at the grocery store....I think you could check their online web page for more information. The prices depend, I think, on the size of the groups order....ours are really good because it is a large group ordering. It works very well for us...we also order organic canola oil, olive oil, oatmeal, seseme seeds....just lots of things and mostly organic. They try for non GMO for non organic stuff and try to source things grown in this country.

the web site is HERE and the minimum order I believe is $500. It might take a few folks to go in together to order enough to meet the minimum...and arrange pick up if they don't come close to your town.
 
Randy Gibson
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Thank all of you for your replies and suggestions.

Randy
 
Dan Grubbs
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One of my favorite ways to try to avoid GMO food is to join a CSA that I interview before joining. I also ask if I can visit their farm to see their operation. I always ask them where they purchase their seed stock. With most CSAs, one can find all the fresh veg and even some eggs, chicken and some also coordinate with a grass-fed beef producer. I think joining a CSA is a great way to support local food and keep small market farms running. Be wary of a CSA that isn't more than open to let you visit. Yes, they may have hours, but if they're not open to you visiting, say no thank you and move on to researching your next CSA.

Secondly, purchase other items at 1-2 farmers' markets near you. Of course you don't want to drive long distances, but intervieweing the farmer before purchases increases your chances of buying non-GMO produce. I know many farmers who are not overly happy with participating in farmers' markets do to their workload, but they usually love interacting with customers and it's your chance to get to know them and their practices and what you expect next week and the week after that so you can do some meal planning. Ask them who they buy their other food from and who they trust. Not all will answer because of wanting to maintain good relationships with other market farmers, but don't be afraid to ask the other customers if they are regulars at the market and what they've learned about what's best, when and what are some price expectations for different part of the season.

Many kids love going to busy farmers' markets because there are usually activities designed for them at the larger ones on weekends. Make it an outing and not just another item of your checklist of things to do. My wife and I love to go to the City Market in Kansas City on busy Saturday mornings. I enjoy the bustle of people and the colors and especially love talking to other farmers.
 
Randy Gibson
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What is a "CSA"? The 2 towns closest to me are Clayton OK, and Talihina, OK. Both are very small. There is a farmers market in Talihina, and we never have checked it out.
I guess it is time to. I am very wary of food etc grown by others. Time to ask "the tough questions".

Thank you, Randy
 
John Polk
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A CSA is Community Supported Agriculture.
You usually prepay a set fee, and the farmer provides you with a box of whatever is ripe (usually every week) throughout the growing season. Some are strictly produce, while others may include eggs, milk, meat, etc.

Depending on the region, this may provide you with fresh produce all season.
You want to find somebody with a large selection, else you may find yourself eating tomatoes and eggplant all summer, with very little else.

I have seen some very sparse CSA's, and others that provide so much variety and quantity that you end up sharing with friends and family. Not only do you want to ask him questions before signing up, but if possible, ask some of his other subscribers. If he has many long term members, that is a good sign (many of the better, old & established ones are booked solid year after year). Others have a constant turn over - that is an indication that something is wrong with his program.

If his sales pitch tells all about his farm, that is good. If all it is is a sales pitch, watch out. Good CSAs usually are very open about their entire operation, as this is what discerning buyers want to know.

Almost all of them are better than supermarket, but some are way better than others. Ask around, as most customers will praise the good ones (and probably will roll their eyes if you ask about one who isn't so good).

 
Randy Gibson
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I'll ask around, I do not think there are any organized CSA's around here.
 
John Polk
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You might try Local Harvest.
In the search box, enter your ZIP code (or closest town), an see if they have any info on nearby CSAs.
That page will give you more info regarding CSAs.

 
Randy Gibson
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checking, thank you.

Randy
 
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