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Welcome Lane Morgan Author of Winter Harvest Cookbook  RSS feed

 
Adrien Lapointe
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Source: newsociety.com

This week Lane Morgan will be joining us to answer our questions about local eating in the winter.

There are 4 copies of her book Winter Harvest Cookbook up for grabs.

Lane herself will be popping into the forum over the next few days answering questions and joining in discussions.

From now through this Friday, any posts in this forum, ie the cooking forum, could be selected to win.

To win, you must use a name that follows our naming policy and you must have your email set up in Paul's daily-ish email.

The winner will be notified by email and must respond within 24 hours.

Posts in this thread won't be eligible to win, but please feel free to say hello to Lane and make her feel welcome!
 
wayne stephen
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Greetings Lane ! Welcome .
 
Eugene Rominger
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Welcome Lane,
let me kick off the question-fest with got any suggestions hearty winter soups ?
And or stews
 
Stephanie Wright
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Hello Lane!!! I am very interested to also hear about hearty stews and soups! I live in Ohio and am very new to this way of thinking so need lots of help!
 
Jim Razore
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Welcome all,

New to posting here but following Paul's mail for quite a while

Hello Lane I am interested in your book and have a few questions you may like to answer,

As a lover of sprouts, what do you recommend as a sweetly flavored counterpart to reduce some of my Brussels bitterness?

I am new to squash but have recently tried Acorn Squash in several dishes. What would be a nice way to serve up this vegetable ; do you remove the skin ?

My salads tend to be fruity and reminiscent of summer time. In these cold winters I want to taste the season, but am coming up short on salads. What veggies can I incorporate for a cold weather Salad?

cheers
 
Christopher Ilg
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Welcome!
 
Lane Morgan
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Eugene Rominger wrote:Welcome Lane,
let me kick off the question-fest with got any suggestions hearty winter soups ?
And or stews


Thanks for the opportunity to participate on this great site--much more convivial than just sitting at a keyboard working on recipes.

Awhile back our household put on a monthly soup night for most of a year. We would invite 20 or so people, make a huge pot of soup and some bread, and hang around slurping and talking for a few hours. Sometimes guests brought dessert or a snack, but it turns out all you really need is soup, as long as you have a lot of it. It was a low stress way to see and feed friends, and I learned which soups are most popular, at least with my pals. This is one that people really liked. It's taken straight from Winter Harvest, hence the cookbooky intro:

Roasted Cauliflower Hidden Garlic Soup

This warming, subtle soup, adapted from The Voluptuous Vegan, uses an entire head of garlic, but I know from many taste tests that no one will guess. The trick is the roasting. Depending on the stock and condiments, it can be meat-based, vegetarian, or vegan.

1 head garlic
5 tablespoons olive oil
4 cups cauliflower, in florets
1 cup chopped leeks, white part
1 medium potato, peeled and cubed
2 cups chopped celeriac
6 cups water or stock
bouquet garni
1 teaspoon hot paprika
2 teaspoons lemon juice


Preheat oven to 400 F.

Slice off the top of the garlic head and pull and rub off as much of the skin as comes off easily. Put the head on a square of foil, big enough to cover, pour on about a tablespoon of olive oil and sprinkle with salt. Wrap the garlic up in the foil and bake until soft, at least 30 minutes.

Put the cauliflower on parchment paper or silicon sheet on a baking dish. Pour a little olive oil on your hands and rub them onto the florets. Sprinkle with salt and spread onto one layer. Roast, checking often, until tender. It’s ok if they color up,

Warm 2 tablespoons oil in a large pot. Saute the chopped leeks over low heat until soft. Do not let them brown. Add potatoes, celeriac, liquid, cauliflower, and bouquet garni. Squeeze the roasted garlic out of the cloves and add to the pot.

Bring to a boil and then simmer, covered, until vegetables are tender. Remove the bouquet garni before pureeing the soup. I favor an immersion blender over a food processor for this, because I like just of bit of texture in the soup.

Return soup to pot, add salt and pepper to taste and stir in the lemon juice.

Garnish with chopped Italian parsley and serve with a dollop of good plain yogurt.


When I'm thinking winter soups I tend to want either something smooth and comforting--like the one above, or a winter squash soups--or something chewier with lots of dark green vegetables. Last night it was just me and I was busy with a project, so I spent a good 5 minutes (including the trip to the backyard for green onions and kale) putting a soup together. Normally I would saute the vegetables first but I just tossed in the aforementioned vegetables, chopped, maybe an ounce of bacon from a hog my son-in-law's co-worker raised, a little red wine, some water, maybe a cup of lentils, and some sun-dried tomatoes. I simmered for half an hour or so, added some garam masala (curry spices) and ate it with yogurt. That was dinner last night and lunch today and it tasted fine to me.

There's a start. Do people want tips for good vegetable stock? That's helpful to have around for fast soups.


 
Lane Morgan
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Jim Razore wrote:Welcome all,

Hi Jim,

"As a lover of sprouts, what do you recommend as a sweetly flavored counterpart to reduce some of my Brussels bitterness?"

Hmmm. Good fresh Brussels sprouts shouldn't be bitter, though I know it happens. I don't know where you are, but if you can grow your own you're way ahead of the game. Sprouts get bitter and "hot" tasting when they aren't fresh, and when they've have matured in warm weather. They are better after going through a freeze. I have broken through crusted snow to harvest them and they were terrific. A plant biologist friend told me that their mechanism for withstanding frost without turning to mush involves converting some of the starch to sugars.

Once you get them to the kitchen, don't overcook them. That's the other way things go badly. I like to coat them with olive oil and roast them in a hot oven--425 F--along with garlic cloves, until they start to get brown spots on the outside. Let them cool a little and splash on some balsamic vinegar or, for a sweeter taste, some of that balsamic glaze.

I am new to squash but have recently tried Acorn Squash in several dishes. What would be a nice way to serve up this vegetable ; do you remove the skin ?

Well, I don't eat the skin, but being the lazy cook that I am, I usually cook them with the skin on--especially acorns because those ridges are a pain to peel. You can microwave squash, but I don't like to. I bake them. Since acorns are smallish, a half makes a good serving. It's easy to cut them in half, scoop out the seeds, rub the cut side with a little butter or oil, place it cut side down on a baking sheet (I use a silicon mat for easy cleanup) and bake at 350 until the skin gives when you poke it. Then you can scoop out the pulp for recipes or just eat it right out of the shell. A little maple syrup with a dash of hot sauce is one popular condiment. I like soy sauce on mine, weird though that may sound--the sweet, bland squash plus salty soya works for me. We used to have brown sugar in a lake of butter when I was a kid, but that's too sweet for me.

If you are a muffin lover, it's easy to add 1/2 a cup of squash puree to muffins. They come out moist and naturally sweet and a nice cheerful color.

One thing to know about acorn squash is that it is not a particularly good keeper, especially when it comes to flavor. Like pumpkins, delicatas, and spaghetti squash, which are in the same genus, it doesn't hold its sweetness long and should be eaten soon after harvest. Other squashes including kabochas, red kuris, sweetmeats, butternuts keep their texture and flavor much longer. I just finished my last garden sweetmeat last week and it was still sweet and firm and delicious.

Here's a squash recipe from Winter Harvest that does call for peeling before cooking:

MOROCCAN SQUASH PURÉE

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 1/2 pounds winter squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1-inch cubes
3 cloves garlic, chopped
1/2 cup water
1 tablespoon chopped parsley
1 tablespoon chopped cilantro
pinch of saffron (optional), crumbled in 1/4 cup warm water
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon cayenne
salt and pepper
1 tablespoon ground cumin

Heat olive oil in a wide saucepan or skillet. Add squash, garlic, and water. Cover and cook, stirring frequently, for 15 to 20 minutes or until squash is tender. Combine rest of ingredients except cumin. Pour over squash and simmer, covered, another 10 minutes. Add a little water if necessary to prevent sticking. The squash will start to disintegrate.

Sprinkle with cumin and serve warm.

SERVES 4.


My salads tend to be fruity and reminiscent of summer time. In these cold winters I want to taste the season, but am coming up short on salads. What veggies can I incorporate for a cold weather Salad?

I agree. I like my winter salads to acknowledge winter. I tend to go more toward cooked or grated vegetable salads and away from lettuce, although by now the ones I planted in September in the cold frame are ready to eat and such a pleasure. (I live in Bellingham, Wash., about 15 miles south of the Canadan border.) Here, yet again from Winter Harvest, is one recipe. Escarole looks like lettuce but the leaves are tougher and the taste more assertive. It's also good passed under the broiler for a couple of minutes and then drizzled with balsamic or just a little olive oil and salt.

ESCAROLE AND CABBAGE SALAD

2 cups shredded escarole
2 cups shredded red cabbage
4 green onions or small leeks
4 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar or raspberry vinegar
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
salt and pepper

Combine escarole and red cabbage in a bowl. Combine olive oil, vinegar, mustard, salt, and pepper and pour over greens.

SERVES 4.
VEGAN


Wow--that was long,
Lane

cheers
 
Eugene Rominger
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Location: Paso Robles,Ca
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1 head garlic
5 tablespoons olive oil
4 cups cauliflower, in florets
1 cup chopped leeks, white part
1 medium potato, peeled and cubed
2 cups chopped celeriac
6 cups water or stock
bouquet garni
1 teaspoon hot paprika
2 teaspoons lemon juice

Thank you for this.
bouquet garni is new to me, I'll have to see if i can find or make it.
 
Lane Morgan
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[
Thank you for this.
bouquet garni is new to me, I'll have to see if i can find or make it.

Not to worry. It's just foodie talk for a little bundle of herbs that you tie together (or stuff in a tea ball) and then take out before serving. Usually it includes a sprig of thyme, parsley and a bay leaf, and you can add other flavors you like. The flavor addition is subtle. You could skip it, or just add a pinch of herbs straight to the soup if you don't mind your puree having little green chewy speckles in it. I wouldn't chop up a bay leaf though--too overpowering. Either float it in the soup or skip it.
 
Mike McAdam
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Lane Morgan wrote:

Here's a squash recipe from Winter Harvest that does call for peeling before cooking:

MOROCCAN SQUASH PURÉE

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 1/2 pounds winter squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1-inch cubes
3 cloves garlic, chopped
1/2 cup water
1 tablespoon chopped parsley
1 tablespoon chopped cilantro
pinch of saffron (optional), crumbled in 1/4 cup warm water
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 cup lemon juice
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon cayenne
salt and pepper
1 tablespoon ground cumin

Heat olive oil in a wide saucepan or skillet. Add squash, garlic, and water. Cover and cook, stirring frequently, for 15 to 20 minutes or until squash is tender. Combine rest of ingredients except cumin. Pour over squash and simmer, covered, another 10 minutes. Add a little water if necessary to prevent sticking. The squash will start to disintegrate.

Sprinkle with cumin and serve warm.

SERVES 4.



Something I would consider with this, if you can, is pressure cooking the squash until it caramelizes, which really brings the sweetness out.
 
Lane Morgan
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Mike McAdam wrote:
Lane Morgan wrote:
Something I would consider with this, if you can, is pressure cooking the squash until it caramelizes, which really brings the sweetness out.


Great idea. When I was in homestead mode and putting up lots of produce in quantity, I used the pressure cooker a lot. It's great for squash, and quicker cooking of dry beans, and lots else.
 
Valerie Dawnstar
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Hi Lane! Welcome to permies and thanks for the recipes!
 
Adrien Lapointe
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So I ran the winner picker and we have 2 winners:

Jessica Gorton
and
Andrew Schreiber


Congratulations Jessica and Andrew!

I sent you an email to ask for the email address of the person that first referred you to Permies.com. That person (if qualified) will also get a copy of the book and a permies care package.
 
Lane Morgan
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Thanks to all for the chats, suggestions, and interesting topics. I'm glad to know about this site and will stick around for more conversations. Photos are from the front yard yesterday--between rain squalls.
blueberry-bud-closeup.jpg
[Thumbnail for blueberry-bud-closeup.jpg]
Blueberry buds on the Ides of March
peach-bud-closeup-resized.jpg
[Thumbnail for peach-bud-closeup-resized.jpg]
Peach buds on the Ides of March
 
Adrien Lapointe
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Thanks a lot Lane for answering our questions! I sure hope you continue to hang out with us at permies.

It sure does not look like this over here on the shores of Lake Ontario. It was -8C today.
 
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