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geese and small children

 
gardener
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Good question! If the ducks feel the need to escape the geese, the duck-size door would be great - but, if something else gets in with the ducks, the geese wouldn't be able to get into that side, to help them. On the other hand, if the geese DO go rogue, the ducks are toast, with a goose-sized door. So... maybe give them a month or two, to get better acquainted, before you make that decision.
 
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Location: Pacific Wet Coast
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You could start with a duck-sized door but cover it with hardware cloth so that even when it's shut, the "door" is a window so they can see each other. If they start ticking off each other in the spring, you could cover the wire with a rag, but I doubt you'll need to. We have setting ducks in our goose shelter all season protected by dog-run fencing and I usually only need to hang a couple of sacks in key areas to keep sensitive birds calm. They can't physically get through the fencing, but I don't particularly want oral arguing either when I want birds setting nicely. The big thing was realizing that it's quite normal for geese to come off the nest during the day to munch some grass and stretch their legs, so we have to remember to open their door even when they're setting, but lock them in at night for safety.
 
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When I was reading about geese, it seemed like all they would eat is tender, newly grown grass. Not these geese!

I love watching them slurp up long blades of grass like it's spaghetti. They also LOVE apples. I can throw an apple that had too many scabs to them, and they'll chew it right up. Ducks can't eat apples unless I make them into tiny pieces. Not so with geese! Their "toothed" tongue and bills bite right into that apple!
 
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Location: Michigan, USA
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We have geese with out ducks - I think that they do give some level of protection to the ducks, but it's not anything to brag about.  
The old gander adopts incubator goslings and ducklings every year and takes good care of them.  His wife can't hatch an egg for the life of her, but she'll care for babies too.  
My 2 year old had a run in with the gander... and now she has a bit of fear of them, but she's learning to give them space, and they don't generally bother her.  I've seen them attack roosters, but not drakes.  The only time they have attacked me is when I am collecting eggs... from under the goose (she wants to hatch them but has never had success, so I hatch them and return them a couple of weeks old)
 
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Location: Northern Maine, USA (zone 3b-4a)
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I've had ducks, geese and chickens that all live together in a big coop. they hang out with their own for the most part but respect each other. the key is raising them together in the 1st. place. geese esp. don't accept newcomers very well. i also handled my geese a lot when they were young. this way they will mind you when they get older. i can let my geese out around kids and they're fine. my aussie heeler on the other hand tries to herd anything she can!
 
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