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Guess the type of wood game

 
gardener
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eastern red cedar/ Juniperus virginiana? look at that heartwood!
 
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Juniper?
 
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greg mosser wrote:eastern red cedar/ Juniperus virginiana? look at that heartwood!



Yes, there we go! Eastern Red Cedar, which is actually in the Juniper family.

Yeah, that color is incredible!

The first image I posted is a tree that was being cut back in order to manage the rare "alvar" grasslands in eastern Ontario. Alvar is essentially open grasslands underlain by limestone. Lots of cool species specialized to these areas.




okay, on to the next one...
 
greg mosser
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i’ve got a pretty diverse woodpile, especially of smaller-caliper bits from thinning around more-preferred trees. there are 7 species represented here (and 4 (edit: actually 5, now that i think about it) that were pretty common earlier in the winter missing!), mostly native.
DDB1DAB2-B060-4335-A6EE-9F550B8C6634.jpeg
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E7211969-049A-4373-B896-E043D2C98EED.jpeg
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Heather Sharpe
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This one was a mystery to me for the longest time.
image.jpg
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John Rosseau
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greg mosser wrote:i’ve got a pretty diverse woodpile, especially of smaller-caliper bits from thinning around more-preferred trees. there are 7 species represented here (and actually 4 that were pretty common earlier in the winter missing!), mostly native.



Oh gosh, we may be at this for a while...

Third from the right could be a sugar maple?
 
greg mosser
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no maple pictured! will give clues after a few more guesses.
 
greg mosser
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heather, is it a viburnum? nannyberry looks a lot like that.
 
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On Greg's: Hickory, white oak, angelica, persimmon, hornbeam, red oak, sassafras are my best guesses.
 
Heather Sharpe
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greg mosser wrote:heather, is it a viburnum? nannyberry looks a lot like that.


Well done, Greg! It is a viburnum, although not nannyberry, sadly. It is not a native. If you guess which species it is, I think you'd be rightly called a wood wizard. It took me over a year and asking every plant person I know to ID this shrub. It even stumped an arborist.

Didn't mean to post a new mystery after you, was just excited to play and must've been typing at the same time.
 
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Greg Left to right.Hickory, Walnut, Shag bark Hickory, Red Oak, Hickory, Red Oak and White Oak.

Please don't make me guess all the Red oak flavors, I had no idea there were so many until I started talking to my neighbor in Arkansas.
 
greg mosser
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no worries! i’ll have to spend some time with my google to study for the wood-wizard title.

jordan got three of them: persimmon (way too young to have the very telling heartwood)at #4, hornbeam aka ironwood aka blue beech at #5, and sassafras at #7.

marty, we have both northern red oak and southern red oak here - and i’ll be happy to talk IDs somewhere else if desired! but there’s no oak at all in the pictures. no hickory either.

marty got #2, it’s black walnut, also too small for much of the very telling heartwood.
 
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Greg - #1 looks a like pine to me, maybe white pine... but if I don't get this one I'll bow out until we venture out of NC!

edit - looked at it again, feeling much less confident
 
greg mosser
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aww, i don’t wanna say no if you’re gonna stop guessing! but no, no pine there.

so yet to be guessed, left to right, are:
#1, where you might note the very fibrous bark along the edge that didn’t want to be sawed through,
#3, which is not a native and was mentioned earlier in this thread (all the beetle holes are also pretty indicative in my area, specifically in wood that’s been cut and is up drying),
and #6, which is the one most touted of all of them as a firewood.
 
Jordan Holland
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Mimosa was my second guess on #3. The bark looked a little rougher than I'm used to seeing.
 
Heather Sharpe
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Is #6 Black Locust?
 
greg mosser
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you’re both right! yeah, mimosa in storage here gets torn up, beetle holes and bark flaking off/roughed up.

#1 is used medicinally.
 
Heather Sharpe
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Is #1 White Willow?

As a hint for the as-yet-unnamed viburnum I posted, it gives off an unpleasant aroma when the leaves are crushed.
 
greg mosser
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not willow!

is it Siebold’s viburnum, V. sieboldii?
 
Heather Sharpe
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greg mosser wrote:not willow!

is it Siebold’s viburnum, V. sieboldii?


Hmm...it isn't slippery elm, is it?

Yep! Well done, wood wizard!

 
greg mosser
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it is! Ulmus rubra.

and nice! i have doubts that i truly deserve that title, but i’ll take it anyway.
 
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You all are amazing at this game - wow!

I tried to give apples to correct guesses. Did I miss any?

 
greg mosser
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just heather with the black locust. and thanks!
 
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Cedar?
 
Heather Sharpe
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This one was hard to capture the color of in a photo, so i took two in different lighting.
image.jpg
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image.jpg
[Thumbnail for image.jpg]
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Is it quite pink, Heather?

I'm surprised no one else has guessed yet! I'm going to make a terrible guess:  is it Douglas fir?

 
Heather Sharpe
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Is it quite pink, Heather?

I'm surprised no one else has guessed yet! I'm going to make a terrible guess:  is it Douglas fir?


Yes, it is fairly pink, Jocelyn. A slightly pale pink, as I said, hard to photograph well. Hopefully that doesn't make it too tricky.
Me too! This is such a fun game! Alas, it is not Douglas Fir. Not a bad guess from the color, though.  
 
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Oh man this is giving me flashbacks to level 2 cabinet making, do you know how many hours I spent scratching and sniffing different woods for a quiz that turned out to only be worth 5 🙃.
 
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Is it larch?
 
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This one is simple. Cedar. Red specifically?
 
Heather Sharpe
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Oh man this is giving me flashbacks to level 2 cabinet making, do you know how many hours I spent scratching and sniffing different woods for a quiz that turned out to only be worth 5 🙃.

Is it larch?


Ha, that sounds fun. This game would be way more fun if we could scratch and sniff!
Nope, not larch.

This one is simple. Cedar. Red specifically?


Nope.

It is not a conifer. It is flowering tree. It puts on quite the spring time display.
 
Jordan Holland
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I had a suspicion it was dogwood, but I don't recall seeing any with any pink hue, and I didn't remember it having such a lace pattern as that.
 
Heather Sharpe
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Jordan Holland wrote:I had a suspicion it was dogwood, but I don't recall seeing any with any pink hue, and I didn't remember it having such a lace pattern as that.


Your suspicion is correct, Jordan! I'd never seen this wood before my grandfather gave us this in a batch of firewood and pointed it out, so I don't know how typical it is for the species. The Wood Database says it can have a pinkish hue. It's quite beautiful wood.
 
Jordan Holland
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Heather Sharpe wrote:

Jordan Holland wrote:I had a suspicion it was dogwood, but I don't recall seeing any with any pink hue, and I didn't remember it having such a lace pattern as that.


Your suspicion is correct, Jordan! I'd never seen this wood before my grandfather gave us this in a batch of firewood and pointed it out, so I don't know how typical it is for the species. The Wood Database says it can have a pinkish hue. It's quite beautiful wood.


It is a nice wood; it's very strong and smooth and beautiful. Too bad they don't get big very often, and they are too beautiful to cut down for lumber! lol
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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What a tricky one, Heather! And Jordan, your knowledge is incredible - well done!!

That smell of freshly cut wood - especially cedar! - can't be beat. It almost makes firewood and other chores worth it.


 
Jordan Holland
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Jocelyn Campbell wrote:What a tricky one, Heather! And Jordan, your knowledge is incredible - well done!!

That smell of freshly cut wood - especially cedar! - can't be beat. It almost makes firewood and other chores worth it.




Thank you, and you are so right! I'm amazed by how differently woods can smell, and almost all of them are good. Cedar, oak, sassafras, pine (I loooove the smell of turpentine!) and dogwood has a subtle, sweet smell. Angelica smells nasty, but it's too small for lumber anyways, lol. Using a plane really releases the smell--those thin ribbons have lots of surface area and the friction of the sole helps heat and release the aromas.
 
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Ever smell siberian elm?  There is no question why it's nickname is "piss elm" if you have ever cut one.
 
greg mosser
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redbud smells pretty nice too, that one always gets me.
 
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eastern red cedar
 
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