• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • jordan barton
  • Carla Burke
  • Leigh Tate
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean
  • Steve Thorn

Guess the type of wood game

 
steward
Posts: 6429
Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
1815
3
hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Meaningless Drivel is where the games are at!

I have a new one, which admittedly I would suck at playing but I think a lot of permies would excel at.

Here's a picture of something I pathetically hacked up with a pruning saw for miniature firewood. It's not seasoned yet, but I brought it in to dry by my woodstove.

Can you guess what this is?

Apples for correct guesses after at least a few folks have given it a try.

Mini-firewood-logs-20210219.jpg
Miniature firewood logs
Miniature firewood logs
 
gardener
Posts: 410
Location: Monticello Florida zone 8a
133
homeschooling hugelkultur monies foraging wofati building wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Are they roots? Perhaps hickory?
 
master steward
Posts: 5068
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1554
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My first thought was hackberry, the bark varies widely from almost completely smooth to almost completely bumpy.

Though hackberry bark is always the same "steely whitish gray" color and your wood looks darker.

Great idea for a game!
 
Jocelyn Campbell
steward
Posts: 6429
Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
1815
3
hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Huxley Harter wrote:Are they roots? Perhaps hickory?



I thought someone might guess roots, but they are not roots!

Not Hackberry either.
 
master gardener
Posts: 2517
Location: Maine, zone 5
1149
2
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hmmm....that's not dried up mistletoe coming out of pine by any chance?
 
Jocelyn Campbell
steward
Posts: 6429
Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
1815
3
hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Greg Martin wrote:Hmmm....that's not dried up mistletoe coming out of pine by any chance?



Nope!

I like the guesses, though!

 
Jocelyn Campbell
steward
Posts: 6429
Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
1815
3
hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm so happy others are playing along!

Want any hints?

It grows rampantly in the Seattle or Pacific Northwest area, but it is not a native.

It makes a friend of mine break out in a rash, but it doesn't bother me.

 
gardener
Posts: 657
Location: the mountains of western nc
164
forest garden trees foraging chicken food preservation cooking wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
poison ivy or one of its rhus brethren?
 
gardener
Posts: 319
Location: Central Indiana, zone 6a, clay loam
173
forest garden fungi foraging trees urban chicken medical herbs ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is a great mystery, love it!
Is it wintercreeper/euonymus?
 
Jocelyn Campbell
steward
Posts: 6429
Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
1815
3
hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

greg mosser wrote:poison ivy or one of its rhus brethren?



Sooo close! Though from a scientific/botanist classification, not in the same family or even the same order, but it IS from the same 3 top-most "clades" (as I look at Wikipedia as a guide...I'm certainly not a botanist) as poison ivy.

 
Jocelyn Campbell
steward
Posts: 6429
Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
1815
3
hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Heather Sharpe wrote:This is a great mystery, love it!
Is it wintercreeper/euonymus?



Nope!

Though today I learned that euonymus shares 4 "clades" with poison ivy while mine only shares 3 "clades." So fascinating!

 
Jocelyn Campbell
steward
Posts: 6429
Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
1815
3
hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here's what I mean by "clades"

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toxicodendron_rydbergii - the North American poison ivy

and

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euonymus

Other plant websites might have better details than Wikipedia, but this was quick and easy for me to grab.

And the image in the OP only shares the top three of these.
poison-ivy.png
poison ivy classification from Wikipedia
poison ivy classification from Wikipedia
wintercreeper.png
wintercreeper classification from Wikipedia
wintercreeper classification from Wikipedia
 
greg mosser
gardener
Posts: 657
Location: the mountains of western nc
164
forest garden trees foraging chicken food preservation cooking wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
so, to be clear, is the hairiness isn’t damaged bark, but a natural feature of the plant while it’s growing?
 
Jocelyn Campbell
steward
Posts: 6429
Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
1815
3
hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

greg mosser wrote:so, to be clear, is the hairiness isn’t damaged bark, but a natural feature of the plant while it’s growing?



What a fabulous question! Yes, the "hairiness" would be considered a natural feature.
 
Heather Sharpe
gardener
Posts: 319
Location: Central Indiana, zone 6a, clay loam
173
forest garden fungi foraging trees urban chicken medical herbs ungarbage
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
English Ivy?
 
Posts: 87
29
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Russian olive?
 
Jocelyn Campbell
steward
Posts: 6429
Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
1815
3
hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Heather Sharpe wrote:English Ivy?



Ding, ding, ding!! You guessed it! Well done and apples for you, Heather!!

I did not know that English ivy, common ivy vines could get this massive. These are the vines that were strangling a majestic Douglas fir tree in the wooded part of the property where I live. Some are/were even thicker than this!

Who knew there could be such a thing as ivy wood to burn for heat?!

Now I wonder if anyone else has a picture for a brain teaser.

common-ivy.png
common ivy or English ivy from Wikipedia
common ivy or English ivy from Wikipedia
 
Heather Sharpe
gardener
Posts: 319
Location: Central Indiana, zone 6a, clay loam
173
forest garden fungi foraging trees urban chicken medical herbs ungarbage
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jocelyn Campbell wrote:Ding, ding, ding!! You guessed it! Well done and apples for you, Heather!!

I did not know that English ivy, common ivy vines could get this massive. These are the vines that were strangling a majestic Douglas fir tree in the wooded part of the property where I live. Some are/were even thicker than this!

Who knew there could be such a thing as ivy wood to burn for heat?!

Now I wonder if anyone else has a picture for a brain teaser.


Thank you for the apples and the super fun game! I hope folks keep playing!

That is crazy it got that big...guess I better turn the rest of the ivy near my spruce trees into baskets sooner than I thought, just in case it gets any ideas! I've got a good one, will have to get some pictures tomorrow.
 
gardener
Posts: 1091
Location: Western Kentucky
446
dog gear foraging trees hunting food preservation cooking fiber arts woodworking wood heat rocket stoves
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This one is quite peculiar; I'll warn it doesn't look like a typical specimen of it's species.
20210220_100014.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20210220_100014.jpg]
20210220_095938.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20210220_095938.jpg]
 
Posts: 11
Location: Norco, California
1
goat
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jocelyn Campbell wrote:Meaningless Drivel is where the games are at!

I have a new one, which admittedly I would suck at playing but I think a lot of permies would excel at.

Here's a picture of something I pathetically hacked up with a pruning saw for miniature firewood. It's not seasoned yet, but I brought it in to dry by my woodstove.

Can you guess what this is?

Apples for correct guesses after at least a few folks have given it a try.



Obviously, these are woods....
 
Posts: 26
Location: Ozarks
11
cooking building homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Jordan,
I'll play.
Hedge apple aka. Osage orange aka. Bodark aka.  Maclura pomifera?
 
Jordan Holland
gardener
Posts: 1091
Location: Western Kentucky
446
dog gear foraging trees hunting food preservation cooking fiber arts woodworking wood heat rocket stoves
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Marty Mac wrote:Jordan,
I'll play.
Hedge apple aka. Osage orange aka. Bodark aka.  Maclura pomifera?



Good guess, but nope!
 
Jocelyn Campbell
steward
Posts: 6429
Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
1815
3
hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It reminds me of the spoons Paul and others made out of serviceberry aka saskatoon or Amelanchier alnifolia, though I think that might not be it...is it?

 
Jordan Holland
gardener
Posts: 1091
Location: Western Kentucky
446
dog gear foraging trees hunting food preservation cooking fiber arts woodworking wood heat rocket stoves
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jocelyn Campbell wrote:It reminds me of the spoons Paul and others made out of serviceberry aka saskatoon or Amelanchier alnifolia, though I think that might not be it...is it?



Nope! Try again!
 
Marty Mac
Posts: 26
Location: Ozarks
11
cooking building homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A cousin of my first guess, Mulberry ? aka Morus.
 
Posts: 7950
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
1702
3
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mimosa?


...beautiful spoon by the way!
 
Jordan Holland
gardener
Posts: 1091
Location: Western Kentucky
446
dog gear foraging trees hunting food preservation cooking fiber arts woodworking wood heat rocket stoves
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Judith! The spalted part does look like mimosa heartwood, but this wood is normally a uniform creamy white color. It's not a mulberry, but it is some type of berry...
 
Marty Mac
Posts: 26
Location: Ozarks
11
cooking building homestead
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hmmm?
Creamy white berry with those grain characteristics makes me think Hackberry.
What finish have you applied?
 
Jordan Holland
gardener
Posts: 1091
Location: Western Kentucky
446
dog gear foraging trees hunting food preservation cooking fiber arts woodworking wood heat rocket stoves
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Marty Mac wrote:Hmmm?
Creamy white berry with those grain characteristics makes me think Hackberry.
What finish have you applied?



Yes! We have hackberries galore here! It is truly an underrated wood. The finish is pure beeswax.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
steward
Posts: 6429
Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
1815
3
hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I love it! Judith is right that your spoon is beautiful Jordan. More apples to you and Marty from me!

Now I'd love to see some "normal" looking Hackberry wood, too.

Looking forward to more pictures for this game...
 
Marty Mac
Posts: 26
Location: Ozarks
11
cooking building homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Your spoon turned out beautifully!

I haven't truly carved spoons, I have far to many power tools and projects that keep pushing hand carving to the bottom of my list. I have made a few spatulas and a mixing spatula that I made from Osage orange over 10 years ago. I just cant seem to wear them out. My Osage versions look very similar when they were new.

I would be willing to bet Hackberry is easier to carve!  
 
Posts: 85
Location: Northern Ontario
20
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I like the idea for this game!

Here's one from central/east:

wood.png
[Thumbnail for wood.png]
 
Jocelyn Campbell
steward
Posts: 6429
Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
1815
3
hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ooh, that looks like a good one, for the game, John!

Random guess only because I've seen people cut it to the ground before:  buddlea davidii (sp?) or butterfly bush?

Edited to add:  do you mean central/east N. America? (On my phone which doesn't show location.)

 
John Rosseau
Posts: 85
Location: Northern Ontario
20
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jocelyn Campbell wrote:Ooh, that looks like a good one, for the game, John!

Random guess only because I've seen people cut it to the ground before:  buddlea davidii (sp?) or butterfly bush?

Edited to add:  do you mean central/east N. America? (On my phone which doesn't show location.)



Nope! But this individual was being cut back for management reasons.

Yes, central/eastern North America.
 
greg mosser
gardener
Posts: 657
Location: the mountains of western nc
164
forest garden trees foraging chicken food preservation cooking wood heat homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
a ‘cedar’ of some kind is my guess, whether botanically a true cedar or something that’s just referred to as such.
 
Marty Mac
Posts: 26
Location: Ozarks
11
cooking building homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Just a guess based on the bark and growth pattern.

I'm going to go with some flavor of willow on your post John.
 
John Rosseau
Posts: 85
Location: Northern Ontario
20
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

greg mosser wrote:a ‘cedar’ of some kind is my guess, whether botanically a true cedar or something that’s just referred to as such.



You are very much on the right track.
 
greg mosser
gardener
Posts: 657
Location: the mountains of western nc
164
forest garden trees foraging chicken food preservation cooking wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
is it a thuja?


i’ve got a pretty good one to follow this up with.
 
John Rosseau
Posts: 85
Location: Northern Ontario
20
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
No correct guesses yet.

Here is a range map, and another picture (not my picture, but it shows some that has been freshly cut, where as the original image I posted had been sitting in the sun for some time):


range-map.png
[Thumbnail for range-map.png]
 
John Rosseau
Posts: 85
Location: Northern Ontario
20
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Image #2
IMG_8977.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_8977.jpg]
 
Heroic work plunger man. Please allow me to introduce you to this tiny ad:
2021 Rocket Mass Heater Jamboree - Wheaton Labs
https://permies.com/wiki/151381/permaculture-projects/Rocket-Mass-Heater-Jamboree-Wheaton
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic