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Hi from the Netherlands

 
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You might like to listen to my latest interview in the Designers of Paradise series on #Regenerative culture and processes.
I spoke with Willemijn de Iongh of the Dutch based Commonland Foundation about her work and where she sees us going forward with community-based ecological restoration.

I think you'll enjoy the conversation. Please share widely, and subscribe (it's free) for more!

https://rasa.ag/willemijn-de-longh-seeing-with-new-eyes/
 
pollinator
Posts: 2651
Location: Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
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Busy times, spring! I have my 'new' allotment garden and our community garden group is organising the 'PlantjesDeelDag' (plant swap day) again. It was supposed to be a yearly event, but last year we skipped it. Now I need to have seedlings and cuttings both for myself and for 'swapping'. I had the luck to find something I could change into a miniature greenhouse. See photo.  It was a toddler's play tent, I used transparent plastic to replace some of the sides. It works very well! And some more planters are in the window sil in my living room.

My miniature greenhouse!
 
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Hi! I am also new and I have not had much in common with herbs so far, but I would like to expand my knowledge and skills on how to take care of herbs.
I think it is better to delve into this topic and be able to heal yourself than to take medications that sometimes you don't know what's in them. Team only natural treatment!
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Patrycja Green wrote:Hi! I am also new and I have not had much in common with herbs so far, but I would like to expand my knowledge and skills on how to take care of herbs.
I think it is better to delve into this topic and be able to heal yourself than to take medications that sometimes you don't know what's in them. Team only natural treatment!


Hi Patrycja. I totally agree: herbs and natural treatments, that's the way! Did you find other interesting 'threads' in this forum on that subject?
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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I happen to make some photos of flowers today. It's because I join a photo-competition, organised by some friends. For the competition I need only one photo, but here I can show more.
Enjoy!

This is 'good king henry' (Blitum bonus-henricus)

Not yet flowers, but soon to come. They are of a kale. The leaf is from a different plant (Chelidonium majus).

Wild violets (Viola tricolor) and dead nettle (Lamium purpureum)

More Lamium purpureum

Apple blossom (Malus domestica)

Some member of the brassica-family (I don't know which) in full bloom

Last but not least: a bumblebee on a wallflower (Erysimum cheiri)
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Hi, Permies in the Netherlands. How are you doing?
Sorry I didn't write a new post for some time. Too busy ...
A gift to you
If you live in the Netherlands (or have a post address in the Netherlands) you can get one of these small sachets of seeds, real Sepp Holzer grains! To sow in your own garden, or in a pot, or wherever you want. These are seeds I harvested from the Sepp Holzer grain that grew from the seeds I received last year. I only collected seeds out of the 6 best oars (the biggest oars on the longest /strongest stems).
Send me a PM (Purple Moosage) with your address (as I said: only in the Netherlands) and I will send you one of these sachets. About 20 seeds in a sachet.


 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
pollinator
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Sorry. Busy times. Forgot to write a new post here.
But here I have a video, so you can see one of those things I'm busy with:

 
master gardener
Posts: 4089
Location: Isle of Skye, Scotland. Nearly 70 inches rain a year
1816
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Thanks for the video (I must learn how to post on youtube!) I love to see what other people are growing, unfortunately I don't speak Dutch. What are the large pale leaved plants at  about 2:10-2:30, quite flat? They don't quite look like brassica?
I like your shelter. Is it to sit out in/ shelter or for growing?
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Nancy Reading wrote:Thanks for the video (I must learn how to post on youtube!) I love to see what other people are growing, unfortunately I don't speak Dutch. What are the large pale leaved plants at  about 2:10-2:30, quite flat? They don't quite look like brassica?
I like your shelter. Is it to sit out in/ shelter or for growing?


Hi Nancy. Those plants are a Verbascum species. Of the same family of what's called Mullein in English (or maybe it is the same species). They are not edible, but I like their flowers, beneficial insects do as well.
The shelter, which will be finished next year (I hope. My son works on it when he has time), has three functions: to sit (to hide for a rain shower), to put materials in and a little bit to grow plants too.
 
Nancy Reading
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Thanks for reply Inge, Stacking functions in the the shelter nicely then. I'd like to build a few shelters in my tree field. Not for anything else but sitting out of the rain and being....
I thought the plant might be mullein. The plant has a nice shape to it. The leaves are supposed to be good as toilet paper alternatives.
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Some days ago a very strong storm came along. They named it Eunice, a nice name, but not a nice storm!
This storm was só very strong, it completely blew over my (not yet finished) garden shed!
Now we need a solution: how to put it back up again??? It is really heavy!
And of course we'll have to 'anchor' it to the ground then ...

 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Hi! I can tell you the garden shed ('tuinhuisje' in Dutch) has returned to its right position (with help of some nice people). More on that later.

I saw this article in Dutch on Sepp Holzer and his book (the Dutch version of it). Interesting (if you can read Dutch language)!
https://www.vonkuitgevers.nl/respectvol-omgaan-met-onze-leefomgeving/
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Hi. Did you see my allotment garden? Here's a tour of it I filmed (using my tablet, no editing, trying to speak English ...)

 
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Location: Roodeschool the Netherlands
4
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Hi Inge,

It's nice to read this thread of what you and other permies have been doing in the Netherlands. I'm from Roodeschool, Noord Groningen, and although my garden might not classify as permaculture, I'm doing my best and trying to apply principles as Paul Wheaton and others explain them. And now I thought I'd dip my toe in here ar Permies.com and post something.

Can I also ask you a question? I mainly battle a lot with slugs (naaktslakken) in my garden, I try to keep on top of it every night, but if I leave for a week or two, I might come back to an almost empty garden. Do you battle with them a lot too, and what do you do about it?
 
pollinator
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Location: Ban Mak Ya Thailand Zone 11-12
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Hoi,

de Duitse vanaf Thailand met 6 taalen in zien geheugen zegt ook welkom...

I was working for 4 years in Ijmuiden and Beverwijk and many weekends I spent around Alkmaar to check the storm proven designs of greenhouses only to design something for my retirement to grow European veggies in an Aquaponics system in Thailand.

But therefore I had to learn all about greenhouses to create the cool (yes cool) spot to make this dream real.

Coincidence, my wife's birthday was yesterday and she signed the contract for our new land on the same day.
The biggest gift she ever had on her birthday and the day my retirement is confirmed after I leave Taiwan in October.
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Henk Lenting wrote:Hi Inge,

It's nice to read this thread of what you and other permies have been doing in the Netherlands. I'm from Roodeschool, Noord Groningen, and although my garden might not classify as permaculture, I'm doing my best and trying to apply principles as Paul Wheaton and others explain them. And now I thought I'd dip my toe in here ar Permies.com and post something.

Can I also ask you a question? I mainly battle a lot with slugs (naaktslakken) in my garden, I try to keep on top of it every night, but if I leave for a week or two, I might come back to an almost empty garden. Do you battle with them a lot too, and what do you do about it?


Thank you Henk for writing something here.
About slugs ... When I started growing vegetables in the back yard (about 2004) the first year slugs were no problem. I think they had not yet found out there was something edible in that former 'plaatsje' (yard without a garden, all concrete tiles). In gardens I had before I saw snails and slugs as interesting little creatures who did not do many harm to my bushes and perennial ornamental plants. The second year of the vegetable garden they started to bother me a little ... I thought to grow vegetables for me to eat, but they liked to eat them too!

From then for some years we tried to do something about the slugs (catch them, beer traps, even sprinkling some salt on them ...). But the more I read about Permaculture, the more I felt: slugs are not the problem ... the problem is: my garden is not (yet) in balance! Where there's balance, the slugs eat their part, but they are eaten by predators too. To get slug-eating predators in my garden there must be slugs for them to eat ...

When that thought was clear to me I stopped doing something about the slugs. Okay, there was something I did: I tried to grow more plants in my garden that are edible to me, but not to slugs. Vegetables I like, but slugs like too, I grow in pots, high on a table, so they can not reach them.

So now I understand why perennial edible plants are such an important part of what's grown in Permaculture. Those are mostly plants that slugs do not eat!
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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See Hes wrote:Hoi,

de Duitse vanaf Thailand met 6 taalen in zien geheugen zegt ook welkom...
.



Hoi See Hes. Wat goed dat je zoveel talen kent!

 
Henk Lenting
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Thanks Inge for the elaborate reply!

Right now, I'm doing polyculture in my vegetable beds, but perhaps I should look into more perannual plants instead. I'm just not sure I can give up my precious courgette plants

I noticed this year that since I've been acting as a slug "predator", I seem to have created a nice habitat for snails (huisjesslakken) to come in and thrive instead.
 
See Hes
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Slug problem or lacking predators has been mentioned in these forums somewhere.

BUT. The Predators like Ducks could work the opposite and enjoy your salads before the slugs come in the night.

The most amazing trick they use in the village of my father in law is so simple that many believe it can't work.

The put a wooden or stone barrier around the plots and glue a copper wire by using silicone around.
Then they clean the plot entirely to make sure there is no slug left inside the barrier.
(Beer traps I would use in Europe as they were working wonders and to eliminate hiding slugs inside the plots its just a tailor made temporary operation)

Any slug that touches the wire will pull back.

I am not really sure what's the issue is.
Is it the poisonous patina that build up on the wire or does the slime of the slugs react with the wire and creates galvanic currents which zaps the well with its slime earthed slug?

But its works for all types of slugs, so much I can say..


 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Sure Henk, you want your courgettes. I do like them too. Some years it helps to grow the seedlings indoors until they are fairly large plants, and only then plant them in the garden. Some years (like last year) even that doesn't work ...

Sen, I heard about the copper wire (or strip) too. I don't know why it works, but it really seems to work. But those special copper wires are expensive ...
 
See Hes
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copper wire is not that expensive otherwise Thais couldn't buy it.
Even here in Taiwan where everything gets imported see picture..
EUR to NT$ = around 1 : 30
Capture.PNG
[Thumbnail for Capture.PNG]
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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See Hes wrote:copper wire is not that expensive otherwise Thais couldn't buy it.
Even here in Taiwan where everything gets imported see picture..
EUR to NT$ = around 1 : 30


Aha, you mean ordinary copper wire! But here they sell special copper tape against snails and slugs ... And that's expensive

 
See Hes
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Inge Leonora-den Ouden wrote:

See Hes wrote:copper wire is not that expensive otherwise Thais couldn't buy it.
Even here in Taiwan where everything gets imported see picture..
EUR to NT$ = around 1 : 30


Aha, you mean ordinary copper wire! But here they sell special copper tape against snails and slugs ... And that's expensive



Funny,
as usual builders Markets sold these copper tapes for other purposes at a fraction of the price in their electronics departments.
Some Smarty wrapped another pack around, calls it slug tape and earns himself a golden nose...

A common wire does exactly the same job, as soon the slug touches it, it pulls back.

In Thailand we get invaded by the Giant African Snail and even these Monsters turn around after touching the copper wire.

As I said:
Its the galvanic current that starts when the slime reacts with the wire or it must be the poisonous patina which grows on copper within days.
Nobody could give me an answer till now.
 
Henk Lenting
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I hope I won't be kicked off the forum for saying I start most of my plants inside, but just like yours, my courgette plants were also completely decimated last year, even after they had already become quit big and well established outside

I love the comment about ducks eating your lettuce before eating your snails!

It sounds like I definitely need to try the copper wire, if it works in African land snails, it might also work on those 15 cm slugs we get here
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Suddenly I became aware I didn't post here for several months!
I blame the season for that. In winter I'm more active with knitting a.a. than gardening. But of course knitting and other ways to make my own clothes and household textiles, that can be part of 'permaculture' too. I do my best to apply permaculture principles in everything.

Let's take the example of knitting. Materials (yarns) I choose are 100% natural fibers, if possible grown locally (at least here in Europe), bought at the local yarn shop, or unraveled from clothes bought (or gifted to me) second hand. I do my best to make items that are useful to me; when I need something new first I think about 'how can I make this myself?' Next thought can be: 'do I know someone who can make this for me?' In that last scenario I think of the way to pay that person, maybe a swap or barter is possible.
When a garment gets 'worn', it's time to do repairs. Darning ('stoppen' in Dutch) is one of my skills, including 'swiss darning' ('mazen').

Somewhere last year I became interested in prehistorical textiles (in western Europe). It was the combination of textile and 'wildcraft' ... those early inhabitants in the region I live now were collecting (sometimes growing) their fiber materials close to where they lived. They processed the plants into fibers, then the fibers into 'yarn' (cordage) and that yarn into items like bags, nets, hats etc. The larger garments were still made of animal hides (fur and leather) in that era ('stone age'). Sheep and wool were introduced here much later, in the 'bronze age'.

I found this all so interesting I decided to become a volunteer 'oermens' (prehistoric human) at the Hunebedcentrum in Borger to demonstrate at events how plant fibers were used.  As such a volunteer I need to have my own clothes in the style of the era. I am busy making those, partly on my own, partly as part of the clothing group at the Hunebedcentrum. The era of the Hunebed (megalithic monument) was the neolithic, the time of the very first agricultural activities while they were still hunter-gatherers too.

Photo of the needles I made from a piece of roe-deer antler:

 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Hi! The garden is doing so very well now ... I hardly have time to write about it. And in the evenings I don't think of it (busy with knitting/crochet and watching youtube).
Here are some photos showing how large the rhubarb grows. And this is only one, the rhubarb in the front yard. There's one in the back yard too. And three growing at the allotment garden. Luckily two of those three are of a variety growing later/slower. Anyway: there's a lot of 'rabarbermoes' to cook!

Rhubarb under a tree in the front yard

Cooking 'rabarbermoes'.
 
Could you hold this kitten for a sec? I need to adjust this tiny ad:
Planning the 2023 Permaculture Technology Jamboree - poor man's poll
https://permies.com/t/206625/permaculture-projects/Planning-Permaculture-Technology-Jamboree-poor
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