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Please help I cant germinate eggplant seeds

 
cameron johnson
Posts: 74
Location: Prattville, Alabama, zone 8, 328ft
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I had a row of Black beauty eggplant this year and had one plant that was bigger than the rest and produced a large amount of fruit so I let one of the fruit grow as big as it could get on the plant and then brought it in and air dried the seeds they dried well didnt shrivel and stayed light colored and I was so excited because it had a thousand seeds to sprout give away and trade but now im worried I cant get any of them to sprout. Im not sure what to do I have started all my other seeds for my garden but this eggplant and a couple of habenaro are the only thing I cant get to grow. Please somebody tell me the secret to growing eggplant from seeds ops:
 
leila hamaya
pollinator
Posts: 1106
Location: northern northern california
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well this could be completely wrong, but my best guess is that its too cold.

the seeds are sensitive to temperatures and wont sprout until they feel the right temp. for eggplant thats really warm, peppers especially like it super hot before they sprout. if you are doing this inside you either wait till its warmer, or get a heat mat.

you can winter sow stuff like this, or start it inside a bit earlier than most...but the seed wont come up until it feels like its "safe" and at the appropriate temperature....

peppers are pretty extreme and they like it totally hot, almost tropical, before they bust out and sprout.
 
cameron johnson
Posts: 74
Location: Prattville, Alabama, zone 8, 328ft
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I have been trying to sprout them in a green house in covered trays with a heat lamp that is a 250w infrared it puts out a lot of heat but its not working
 
Alder Burns
pollinator
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Location: northern California
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I agree with the above poster....eggplant and peppers both need temps of at least 80F to sprout, and even then can take a week or two. The other possibility is that the eggplant wasn't mature enough. Mature enough to eat and ripe seed are quite different....the eggplant should have been dull, and beginning to turn yellowish.
 
cameron johnson
Posts: 74
Location: Prattville, Alabama, zone 8, 328ft
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I wouldnt say that the eggplant was turning yellow but it had stopped growing and was changing from blackish purple to brown with darker brown stripes and was starting to get pretty soft
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Hi Cameron,
What you need, since you have them in a green house already, is Heat Mats. The problem is, top heat will not get the growing medium to the right temperature for good sprouting.

I worked part time at Pieto Seed Farm in northern California in 1970-71, as part of my Horticulture degree requirements. We started all sorts of vegetable seeds every season just to grow more seed from. We had incubators, Heat Mats and Growing lights. Our usual method of starting any crop was to place the seeds in between properly damp blotter mats which went into the incubators, when the seeds started sprouting we placed them in individual peat pots filled with a proprietary growing medium and these were placed in trays which went on top of the heat mats. Bottom heating is the best method of getting new plants off to a smashing start. Once these new babies were opening their cotyledons the 1000 watt grow lights were turned on for 14 hours a day cycle. These plants were transplanted into the fields at the end of march, and had been growing since January at that time.

Eggplants are fully seed ripe when picked just as you described, so non mature seed is not your problem, lack of bottom heat is. Uncover those trays (misting is better), get some heat mats, place your trays on top of them and get rid of the IR lamps, you want halide grow lamps.
 
Thomas warren
Posts: 67
Location: Yakima County, E WA
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I grew eggplant and peppers from seed last year.
They both take a while to sprout, eggplants taking longer. Peppers are covered with an oil that protects them from bird stomachs and whatnot, and I don't know what eggplants problem is but it likes it warm kinda moist for a while before anything will happen. They are a warm weather crop, so if temps at night are dropping it may prevent it from waking up.
I did mine in my apartment, took several weeks for the first ones to come up.
 
Bethany Dutch
Posts: 164
Location: Colville, WA Zone 5b
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quick way to make a heat mat (I'm betting that's your problem, eggplant and hot peppers are notoriously slow to germinate and need the heat) is to get a seeding tray, arrange a string of Christmas lights in the bottom, cover with sand, and stick your tray with the potted seeds right on top. The christmas lights will provide the right amount of heat and the sand helps distribute it evenly.
 
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