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Growing Globe Artichokes in Zone 5

 
Posts: 27
Location: east central indiana
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I'm thinking about growing some Globe Artichokes (cynara sp), but I Live in Zone 5.
Some kind of winter protection will be needed.

Is it better to start with seeds or by division? I read about seeds not being true to type.

Is the harvest worth it? The amount of food looks kind of small per plant.

I'm sure the insects (bees, etc) will enjioy the flowers.

Is this a front yard plant or better out back?

Anybody with experience growing these in cool climates?

Thanks
Pete
 
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Location: Anjou ,France
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I have grown from seed and cuttings , the cuttings tasted better being french but the british ones from seeds were ok but smaller . Not sure where you could get seeds states side but here in france they are often grown as a structural plant in a flower border so go for it out front I say its just a big thistle anyway

David
 
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Hey Pete,

Any luck with artichokes in zone 5?

Aaron, in Wisconsin
 
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Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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I did artichokes in zone 4 two years ago.  The idea (as I understand it) is that they flower/fruit on their second year.  So we have to trick them into thinking they've had a California winter.  

I started them indoors Mar 13th and started hardening them off April 20th.  The earlier you start, the bigger they'll be when they go outside for their "winter".  I forget what they think they need for winter but I believe it's 50 degrees or something.  So put them outside but bring them in when it flirts with freezing.  Or if you have a cold place in the sun to put them (sunroom, porch) it could work swimmingly.  Then transplant them out after danger of frost for their "second summer".  Mine took their time putting up a flower but we got some.  Each plant did about 4 fruits.  Or are they vegetables...

It was a nice novelty but I'm probably not growing them again due to the size they take for the ounces they produce.
 
Aaron Schmidt
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Hi Mike,

So, you kept them in containers for the summer, or did you transplant them? I have loads of space. I grew up near Castroville, Ca.(The artichoke capitol of the world) and would like to give it a try...
 
Mike Haasl
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Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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Hi Aaron, I started them in decent sized pots (4" diameter I believe), then planted them in the ground after the frost damage was past (1st week of June up by me).  Have fun with it!
 
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