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tree ears 'brown ear fungus'.....does anyone eat them?  RSS feed

 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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We are having a wet spring....and tree ears auricularia auricula 'brown ear fungus' are appearing (these were on a standing dead hickory). We have tried to eat them in the past and they weren't very palatable....I don't remember how I tried to cook them, probably something simple as that is what I usually do for a new food...see how it tastes plain before I try to cover it up/add to it's flavor or lack of.

anybody have a good way to use these? ...just the name is a little off putting to begin with

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John Saltveit
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I have bought wood ears (they're related) at my local Asian grocery store and I just like to steam them, slice them thinly and mix them in with grains and leafy vegies, for a kind of a casserole.
John S
PDX OR
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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John Saltveit wrote:I have bought wood ears (they're related) at my local Asian grocery store and I just like to steam them, slice them thinly and mix them in with grains and leafy veggies, for a kind of a casserole.
John S
PDX OR


thanks, John. I just went out and harvested a few to try drying them. They are a bit past prime...already drying on the edges. I did a little more reading and it sounds as though they have some nutritional value (B-2, iron, protein) and the suggestions for using are as you posted....stir fries also.
...also
used in Oriental medicine to prevent heart disease. They are also believed to contain anticoagulant substances that act like blood thinners creating effects similar to that of aspirin.


 
Judi Anne
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They are ok in a sweet and sour soup. I think that's the only way I've tried them that seemed truly palatable to me. In general they don't seem worth the bother anymore though I will probably keep gathering and preparing every few years to make sure the info gets passed down at least one generation.
 
Mike Patterson
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I dry them and regularly put them in soups. Just because their flavor might not be outstanding doesn't mean it's not worth harvesting them and adding to your diet. Lots of foods we take for granted and eat on a regular basis aren't that tasty on their own but we still use them all the time. I figure any safe wild edible mushroom is contributing something positive to my health.
 
Mat Ar
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Location: Texas USA
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I eat them at least once a month, usually in soup but sometimes in a stir fry with ground turkey and spices. Then I'll wrap the mix in lettuce leaves and serve wraps!
 
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