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do wild foods remineralize teeth?  RSS feed

 
Joy Oasis
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Wecome, Sergei. My question: do you know of any cases with people eating lots of wild food and remineralizing their teeth/bones? I am very interested in teeth remineralization, and it looks like all the sources include large amounts of grass fed meat and dairy. Would it be possible on vegetarian diet?
 
Sergei Boutenko
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Joy,

I've heard cases of teeth being remineralized, but when I follow up on such cases the road seems to end. So at this point in time, I have not concrete answers for you about teeth.
 
Dale Hodgins
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Concrete and teeth are not compatible.☺ One thing that I see mentioned often are worries about very clean water leaching minerals from our bodies. We get the minerals we need largely through our food. Drinking plenty of good water will not remove them. Too much acidity can cause bone loss. Massive amounts of meat, coffee or Coca kola can erode teeth and bones.
 
Angelika Maier
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NOrmally green stuff if it is too much and not balanced with other food does demineralize teeth. Eat a bone soup each week.
I don't think there's a vegetarian way. What is good for theeth and bone is horsetail, but still you would need the bones.
 
Dale Hodgins
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Angelika Maier
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that;s the science...
 
Keira Oakley
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actually, there is a point in what you are saying... BUT not in the way you might think (in my humble opinion).
The good thing with wild greens etc: if you don't wash them, you'll get natural bacteria, and some B-12, found on the surface of the plant, that I personally think is beneficial for teeth.
The bad thing: anti-nutrients, oxalic acid as stated above...
so it depends... what sort of plant etc... But if it is not too big amounts, and unwashed (if picked in a pristine natural environment), could be helpful...
BUT... I still think you need some sort of non vegetable nourishment... doesn't have to be meat... could be tiny insect eggs, aphids etc... that are nested in greens and herbs. Or go for some insects if you dare, and know which ones are edible. So, another reason for not washing (too much anyway) those herbs and greens.
I can tell you an interesting true story about fruit bats. Some scientists has these fruit bats for observation in a lab, they were feeding high quality fruits. After some time they really started to get sick. They had no idea why... and after a long time, they realised that the fruit bats where not living on fruits alone. They NEEDED to have larvae, insect eggs, and insects, as well... Even if it was a small amount...
I think that we really know very little about real nutrition.

 
Keira Oakley
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Actually, there can be different reasons for getting stronger teeth. Heavy metals and toxins are really a source of bad teeth health. Some people are more sensitive to heavy metals than others: I am one of them, and I don't eat any sort of fish/shellfish anymore, and have noticed a bit of an improvement.
Some sort of detox could be helpful, as well as avoiding habits/foods that are poisoning our system. In a way, we 're just an image of the earth...
And the interesting thing is, many people in mental hospitals, who get a lot of medication, but are givien relatively healthy food, get bad teeth in the long run, because of the chemicals... and look at junkies, why do they have so bad teeth...? because the drugs they take are packed with toxic chemicals (this is not my own private theory, it's been stated by W Price followers).
Maybe we are all different and react on different things. I do not drink coffee anymore, but when I did, I could really feel how bad my teeth felt after.
And, after having eaten some animal product (not dairy!) or insects I can feel my teeth get stronger.
 
John Master
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Vitamin A is vital to health, including tooth health. Vitamin A (Retinol) is only found in animal products. You can get beta carotene from plant products but it is not the same and does not always convert to usable vitamin A. One of the reasons, bone broth, cod liver oil, lard, suet, butter, raw milk, yogurt meats, liver, organ meats etc are such nourishing foods, they are loaded with vitamin A in it's natural food based form.
 
Reisha Beck
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there are high amounts of trace minerals in diotomacious earth. it also contains alot of silica. consuming diotomacious earth should be moderated and consumed by people who can, do , and will drink plenty of water unless you want to be constipated. there area a few brands of diotomacious earth that can be consumed.
first i make sure the diotomacious earth i consume is 100% diotomacious earth, some brands add filler. 100% diotomacious earth is white. there are others that look like dirt. there is a brand out there which features bentonite clay in there diotomacious earth its by a company called red lake. i like it because the bentonite is a good detox and intestinal cleanser. there are many very good features about consuming diotomacious earth.
it adds trace minerals not found in foods
it is high in silica which is good for alot of things in your body such as bones
and it also will rid any parasites in your intestinal tract
i did lots of research on internaly consuming diotomacious earth before incorporating it into my diet as should any one.
this might "remineralize your teeth"
 
Roberto pokachinni
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To answer the OP, wild foods do not have to contain tons of oxalic acids. Some definitely have more than others, and should be avoided if you have dental problems. Most wild plants that have concentrations of oxalic acids do not have such high concentrations when they are younger. It is only when the plant is older and needs to support more upward growth that Oxalic acids and crystalline cell structures form, from what I understand. The foods tend to be tougher, not as nutritious, and were generally not sought out by native peoples at this stage. Nettles, for instance, have very little Oxalic acid when they are under 6 inches tall, and it isn't until they are over a foot tall that they really start to develop harmful concentrations of Oxalates. Oxalic cellular structures can sometimes be broken down by drying the plant, and then reconstituting it in soup (as is the case with a native preparation for very young skunk cabbage leaves).

I don't buy many of the theories, except for the acids etching your enamel thus weakening your teeth and making them susceptible to bacterial infections.

Acidic diets, and acidic foods should be avoided if you have tooth problems. You saliva is naturally alkaline. If you drink adequate water you will produce enough saliva to keep your mouth in an alkaline state.

Too much teeth brushing will also scratch the enamel on your teeth, weakening them. I brush my teeth only at night before bed, unless there is a social event that demands extra hygiene. I rinse my mouth with water if I do eat acidic foods. Brushing before bed allows for the alkaline saliva to sit on the teeth for the healing process during the night.

Most people view teeth as one time growth events. Contrary to this widespread myth, teeth naturally heal and grow all the time, like bones, otherwise they would be ground down to the roots in no time due to our mastication.

I know a guy who had his fillings removed and, while fasting on alkalizing green juices for the first few days, packed the cavities with small amounts of a mix of comfrey, golden seal, and myrrh. The teeth healed fully in less than a month on an alkalizing vegetarian diet, with the herbal cavity packs at night.

If I ever have an achy tooth, I brush the shit out of it (quite literally, as it is the bacteria that are breaking down the inner tooth), and then I drink green juices for a day or two, and also drink lots of good mountain water. The tooth ache goes away and doesn't return.

 
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