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Plant id - mulberry

 
gardener
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I have a few of these around the yard, one I have let grow 12' plus. Any idea what I got here?
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What kind of Tree?
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Might want to google "mulberry leaf" and see if it seems to match?
 
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Red and White Mulberry identifying guide from Purdue University.
https://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/fnr/fnr_237.pdf
 
William Bronson
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! Excellent, I suspected as much but needed confirmation.
No berries yet, is that common?
 
Joylynn Hardesty
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Well, mine bloomed this year, for the first time. It did not produce fruit. One source said that there are male trees and female trees. I do not know if there is a difference in flower shapes...
Does anyone know the answer to that one?
 
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I have 4-5 mulberry trees that have grown from seed and there are a ton more that come up close to me every year. Probably 3 out of 5 come with leaves that look more like a fig than mulberry, all but 1 produce fruit, the one that hasn't has never been a healthy looking or growing tree. It took all the seedlings a good 5-6 years to start producing. Back to the original question, those leaves look like the mulberry that sprout from seeds around my place.
 
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They will flower at pretty much the same times.

William i have seen a mulberry coppice fruit on wood that was about 1/2 inch diameter at the base. Are yours fresh sprouts or have they been getting cut down and regrowing for a while? A fresh sprouted single trunk mulberry will probably be 12+ feet before fruiting.
 
William Bronson
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The big one is in the middle of the strip of black berries, and my wife had tried to kill/and or tame it( she "braids" the branches) multiple times.
I have really wanted one of these trees, I love the fruit, remembering it fondly from my yewt, and hey nonny nonny, edible protein rich leaves!
If it fails to fruit, can it be grafted, male to female, for hermaphroditic goodness?
 
Joylynn Hardesty
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Wouldn't you know it, mine is male. So is my sassafras. Off to snag a bunch of branches to root...
 
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William Bronson wrote: ! Excellent, I suspected as much but needed confirmation.
No berries yet, is that common?



Did it flower....if yes, it could be a male plant...my start bearing very early like Figs
 
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