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Rockwell Beaver

 
Posts: 102
Location: Sudbury ON, Canada
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Hi All,
Is this table saw worth the price, if not, how much do you think?

Rockwell Beaver Table Saw
http://www.kijiji.ca/v-power-tool/sudbury/rockwell-beaver-table-saw-in-excellent-condition/1102423625?enableSearchNavigationFlag=true
3/4 horsepower motor, single phase
Cast iron top and extensions
Comes with fence and push guard
Factory Stand
Total of 50 inches of table top
Excellent condition!
$225 or best offer.


Thanks-

TK
 
Posts: 618
Location: Volant, PA
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goat forest garden fungi trees wofati woodworking
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I would look to the motor attachments, the newer cabinet saws are going direct drive rather than a belt driven system. This allows more angle to cuts and less maintenance.

For me that price is right on the cusp, if it has been treated well, then it's good......if it has been beat up then maybe not....

It's not an incredible deal, but it's not an unreasonable price either.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1640
Location: Victoria BC
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3/4HP isn't too much. If you plan to cut a lot of thick stuff, you might want more.

What size is the blade? It doesn't actually say it's a 10", and some of those older saws are 8" max. Does it matter to you?

Not too sure about the fence on that saw, definitely see how you like adjusting it/using it if you do go look. If I buy another tablesaw, I'll be holding out for a really good existing fence; I replaced the rail/fence on mine with a 6-ft length of 2x3 steel holding a standard beysermeyer-style fence on it, mated to a plywood extension on a movable frame, and it was a fairly time-consuming pain in the ass.

My old Homecraft (Delta built) from the 50s is an 8". Saw was free, though it didn't include blade, a good stand, or table extensions. I find the blade size and 3/4HP motor to be juuust adequate, but a good fit for available power. I actually like the belt-drive system, if the blade stalls then in theory the belt can slip, no such option with direct drive. May also allow more flexibility in motor replacement if/when needed.

I wouldn't offer more than $150 for that saw, but I'm cheap!
 
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I paid nearly $400 for my new hybrid saw from home depot. I would say that if the moving parts aren't warn out and the motor is good, then it it is worth the $225 that they are asking. Beaver is generally pretty well built. The cast iron top makes this saw infinitely better than the typical table top aluminum styles.

Edit: presuming that it IS a 10 inch blade.
 
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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Remember that the add says OBO. That's a good quality machine. Belt drive is very forgiving. When the blade comes to an abrupt stop, there is less shock to the drive mechanism.
 
Chadwick Holmes
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Ok guys we gotta talk about sharpness and not stopping your saw.......

A sharp blade puts less pressure on your motor, and is safer to you....

You should not ever stop your motor, the slowness of a blade either stopping or restarting is the greatest catch hazard, this is very dangerous, please stop doing that.....

I have Amish friends whose saws are hooked to 40hp Diesel engines, I have seen boards shoot through shop walls from a catch, I have taken one to the lower abdomen when I was younger, it will put you on the ground, possibly with internal damage. As I was writhing from the board bashing my mentor came in and said did you catch a board? Yes! Well you won't do that again......he was right I never have.

Please a saw stop is no joke and move on situation, sure we can control this on a 3/4 hp saw, but the one time you don't maintain control might mean a hospital stay. And if you use a saw that is more powerful and have this bad habit of pinching you can get a serious injury. I have a 3 hp table, and I never get behind a board and never allow a pinch that I can control......sharpness is safety!

Sorry to be a lecturer but I had to say something, not out of anything but love......
 
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I've owned 3 of these saws over the years, still have one. The one I wish didn't get away was an all cast iron version. Normally they sell for 50-100 Canadian. The ones I have were last sold in probably the 60s, the one in the add looks a little newer, but not necessarily better.
 
Tom Kozak
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Location: Sudbury ON, Canada
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Dillon Nichols wrote:
What size is the blade? It doesn't actually say it's a 10", and some of those older saws are 8" max. Does it matter to you?



don't think it matters to me, what are the prose and cons of different blade sizes?
 
Chadwick Holmes
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Available cutting thickness, a 10" blade protrudes past the table further, so it can cut thicker stock.

Cutting teeth, all other things equal, a larger blade will have more teeth and use each tooth less for the same cut, therefore will stay sharp longer.

Ease of purchase, 10" is standard and available in all box stores, 8 inch is harder to find, especially in the high end blade dept.

Energy, a larger wheel is more likely to continue spinning than a small one due to mass and centrifical inertia.

 
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Yes, this is an ancient thread.  But for the next guy searching...

Beaver made a bunch of different saws before being bought out by Rockwell, who then merged with delta.

Things to look for:

1.  Cast iron top.  Sheet metal tops bend, flex, dent, and are a PITA.  Tolerable for construction sites where 1/8" is good enough.

2.  extension wings on either side.  Allows you to handle wider work -- and to have a bigger table to accumlated junk.

3.  Body:  Heavy gauge sheet metal at least.  Some have a partial cast body.  

4.  Drive train:  Check for play in the whole saw support mechanism.  Bearings in the blade shaft are easy to replace.  Check the rack (tilt and rise) castings for cracks.  Those are show stoppers as very hard to replace.

5.  Fence.  Move easily?  Ok.  Slide it over to to one of the mitre slots.  Clamp it.  Is it perfectly parallel to the slot.  Try clamping while putting a bit of sideways pressure on the far end.  An inconsistent fence isn't a show stopper, but it will either require work or replacement.  Usually it's designed in so you need a replacement.

***

So, what is it worth:  Easiest way to find out the value is to look at ebay and search for closed listings.  This will tell you what others like it sold for.

Here, in Edmonton good beavers go for 100 to 200 bucks.
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