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dos zagone
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So on a different thread someone mentioned the site OIKOs tree crops. On that sight they have a section perennial potatos. One of the potatos is called Zolushka and the site says it will grow from seeds. Has anyone ever done this on here. Will the seeds the plant produces make more fruits that will have seeds and will those seeds also have the same kind of potato or will it be a luck thing. Also says perennial so does that mean plant and it will come back each year. Sorry ahead of time about all the questions.
 
Roberto pokachinni
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Some of my potatoes produce little green 'tomato'-like fruits. I've often wondered whether these seeds might be viable to create crops. This is pretty exciting.

Also says perennial so does that mean plant and it will come back each year. Sorry ahead of time about all the questions.


For anybody joining the thread, this is the quote from the oikos site on the zolushka spud:

This is one of the very few potatoes that can be grown from true seed that is available commercially. Zolushka is considered a good frying potato and is one of the most prolific producers out yielding hundreds of other varieties. We sell tubers of the largest selections that were all grown from true seed. True seed is the teeny seed extracted from the fruit of the potato which is often ignored and thrown out. Often the population of these genetically different selections show variation in tuber size. So we kind of tweeked the population a bit by selecting the larger tubers which can be up to 4 inches in diameter. For chips, this is ideal as most of the tubers are very round or oblong..Zolushka has a smooth skin with uniform 2-3 inch long potatoes. Makes bunches of early potatoes too. 80-95 days from tubers. These selections also produce true seed too with fruits ripening in September. One fruit can contain easily 100 or more seeds.


No need to apologize for questions; sharing info is what this site is really about! It may very well be that the potato may take a few years to produce crops from seeds rather than from tubers ('80 to 95 days from tubers'... but how long from seed?), and thus it is more of a perennial. You might want to email or call Oikos for more info. Most seed companies are made up of super passionate folks who would love to share information with you about their unique products. Potatoes do not go away if you leave some tubers in the ground to clone up the next year, so it sort of is a perennial already.
Will the seeds the plant produces make more fruits that will have seeds and will those seeds also have the same kind of potato or will it be a luck thing.
It says at the end of their quote above that true seed is produced from these selections. That means that they have stabilized the variety, and the tubers that you would purchase would produce fruits that ripen in September (at their location) and these fruits will have viable seeds.

Pretty cool.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Zoluska was not winter hardy in my zone 4b garden. It was one of the least cold-hardy potatoes that I have grown. It might survive the winter in warmer climates. The seed came pelleted though, so was much easier to work with than typical teeny potato seeds.

Potatoes and tomatoes are currently classified as belonging to the same genus, therefore their growth patterns are very similar. I grow potatoes about the same as I grow tomatoes: Start seeds in a greenhouse about 6 weeks before last frost and plant them out after danger of frost is past. Potatoes require very bright light to prevent etiolation: growing long and spindly.

Modern commercial potatoes are sorta fruiting. About 85% of varieties don't make seeds. In my garden if a potato seedling doesn't produce seeds in the first generation, then I eat it or throw it away. The ability to make pollinated seeds is the most important selection criteria for potatoes in my garden.

Potatoes have 4 sets of chromosomes, so inheritance is muddled by that.

True Potato Seeds


I think that this was a Zoluska potato seedling:


Potatoes grown from seed. The white potatoes on either end of the bottom row are Zoluska. The green fruits contain more potato seeds. Only some plants produced fruits. Each basket contains the entire harvest of fruits and tubers from one seedling. Typically plants started from tubers produce a larger harvest than plants started from seeds in my garden.


Ripe Potato Berries:


I offer more details about cultivation on my web site: True Potato Seeds
 
Roberto pokachinni
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I had a feeling Joseph would offer his experience/wisdom/resources.

What is your most cold hardy potato variety, Joseph?

 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Roberto pokachinni wrote:What is your most cold hardy potato variety, Joseph?


I grow potatoes that don't have names. Among them, the fingerlings tend to survive the winter better than any of the other types.

Potatoes are winter hardy in my garden about 3 years in 5.
 
Roberto pokachinni
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I grow potatoes that don't have names
lol. the landrace thang. I definitely have to wrap my brain around the promiscuity angle and look at all your posts in this regard.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Roberto pokachinni wrote:lol. the landrace thang. I definitely have to wrap my brain around the promiscuity angle and look at all your posts in this regard.


It might be a long path... I have been working closely, in my garden, with a lady for about 8 years. Every once in a while she'll say, "Wow, this is great, what variety is it?", Followed immediately by, "Oh never mind, it's Joseph's ain't it?"

I almost never reply to posts asking "What variety should I plant?" Because the varieties that thrive best in my garden are "Joseph's" if they have any name at all.

At the farmer's market, since my daddy and I share a booth, the variety name is "Lofthouse". I don't know why people even ask...

My long term goal with tomatoes is self-incompatibility: So that they become mandatory out-crossers. I believe that is the best path forward for food security and safety in regards to tomatoes.
 
dos zagone
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Couple of questions for you Joseph, What do you mean by manadatory out crossers. And why is that better? Also do you sell any of your successful breeds. My zone is 5b in North West Indiana so I would think some of your breeds would do good here. And for anyone else have you ever heard of nine star broccoli. In a different thread some one mentioned it and said it was perennial. Thanks
 
dos zagone
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Joseph you can disregard the selling part im all over your page now LOL. This is awesome stuff.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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I'm not currently selling potato seeds. I have tens of thousands. So as a gift to the community, I'll send a free packet of true potato seeds to anyone that sends me a Self Addresses Stamped Envelope. Please put a note in the envelope about what you would like... Yes. People actually send me mystery requests. PM to get my mailing address if you don't already have it.



 
dos zagone
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From what ive been reading on your site I should shoot for potatoes that only produce more fruit with seeds. And I assume also have a decent potato production correct. With the potato at the beginning of the tread being seed bearing do you think it would be a good starting cross pollination. Maybe work on cold hardy as a secondary issue. Also how big of a area and how many plants to keep it from being interbred.
 
dos zagone
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So i just received my TPS from lofthouse and I'm super excited. So i was searching the internet and i came across this video. He mentions a perennial potato at 8:00. Figured id add to this topic. Also he is trying to get TPS as well.
Thanks Joseph.
 
dos zagone
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So again just adding for updat reasons. I planted the TPS from lofthouse on April 6th I think and now have little sprouts in all of my containers. I planted some clones at about the same time and have not seen anything yet. Super excited. Also excited about the plant breeding section on here. Thanks lofthouse for the TPS
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Dos: It's nice to get grow reports. Thanks.

On my farm, I choose to only grow potatoes that make fruits. And I want to always have a good store of pollinated potato seeds on hand. Because I think that is a more secure way to store potato propagules than storing tubers.

I plant seedlings about 12" to 18" apart. That lets me look at each plant as it is growing, and keeps the tubers mostly separate when I dig them. I tend to only keep about 15% of new varieties for planting as tubers next year.

I want my potatoes to be promiscuously pollinating, so I plant them close together in patches. The seeds that I am sharing are tetraploid, which makes them less susceptible to inbreeding. Potatoes can be either selfing or cross-pollinating. In my garden, they are highly favored by bumblebees.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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dos zagone wrote:Couple of questions for you Joseph, What do you mean by manadatory out crossers. And why is that better?


Open pollinated (inbred) tomatoes tend towards yields that are about half of what hybrid (out-crossing) tomatoes produce... Also, if genes are constantly being rearranged there are more opportunities for traits to show up to deal better with diseases and pests. There are genes in wild tomatoes that make it so that a plant can't pollinate itself. That means that it needs to be cross-pollinated by another plant. So a mandatory out-crossing tomato would retain more genes in the population, and would be constantly rearranging those genes to deal with new conditions. I think that a tomato like that would be magnificent. Details about my project to develop that kind of tomatoes are at: http://www.permies.com/t/54641/plantbreeding/Auto-Hybridizing-Tomatoes

 
David Livingston
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Sorry can I get my head round this . Joeseph you plant seeds not seed potatos
Do the seeds produce as good as crop per area as seed potatos ? Or do you grow them insitu for a couple of years before harvest ?
Insidently have you heard of a chap called Pascal Poot , he is famous for growing his own land race toms here in France, low water requirements ,although he does heavy heavy mulching with donkey droppings http://www.lepotagerdesante.com/

David
 
Jason Learned
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Roberto pokachinni wrote:Some of my potatoes produce little green 'tomato'-like fruits. I've often wondered whether these seeds might be viable to create crops. This is pretty exciting.

Hi Roberto,

Two years ago the weather here in Bohemia was fine enough that I got some of those fruits on my purple potatoes, I planted Many last year and only about 8 made it. One was still purple, I will grow those again this year and then see if they are worth saving with a taste test. I did not want to eat them all if they were going to be good.


Jason
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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David Livingston wrote:Sorry can I get my head round this . Joeseph you plant seeds not seed potatos


I plant both... I plant pollinated seeds in order to create new varieties of potatoes. About 15% of the seedlings produce potatoes that I really like. I replant those as seed potatoes (in other words as clones of tubers).

David Livingston wrote:Do the seeds produce as good as crop per area as seed potatos ? Or do you grow them insitu for a couple of years before harvest ?


Seedlings are slow getting started, so in my short growing season, they typically do not produce as well as a plant started from a big piece of tuber.

I dig the tubers from the seedlings in the fall and replant in the spring. After the first year, they are planted just like any other potato.

 
David Livingston
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I was thinking of asking for some seeds and then thought maybe not as there are issues about deseases and pests . We already have that jolly looking colerado beetle here in France plus the blight now has found all about sex in the past ten years
I will think on this idea .

David
 
Todd Parr
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David Livingston wrote:I was thinking of asking for some seeds and then thought maybe not as there are issues about deseases and pests . We already have that jolly looking colerado beetle here in France plus the blight now has found all about sex in the past ten years
I will think on this idea .

David


Can diseases or pests be carried in seeds?
 
Linda Secker
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One of my varieties has produced the little fruits this year, so I'm gonna have a go too!! My potatoes always flower (and the bees love them) but rarely set fruit so I've not been able to try this before

A question though - how do you store your tubers over winter to replant in the spring? Mine always end up with long straggly stems long before planting time..... although any I have missed when digging them up re-grow as volunteers

 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Linda Secker wrote:how do you store your tubers over winter to replant in the spring? Mine always end up with long straggly stems long before planting time.....


Store them in someplace where they get light, and they won't get long and leggy. I store mine in a box, with an open top, that sits in a closet with a window. They don't get any direct sunlight, just light from the window.

 
Linda Secker
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Thanks Joseph - I'm gonna try that I've always kept them in the dark....
 
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