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fresh smashed grapes as fertilizer?

 
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Hi, I was wondering which is the best way of using fresh smashed grapes as fertilizer.
In my land i have vines, and some days ago i extracted all the grapes for producing wine. After producing the wine ( smashing the grapes) i got a lot of smashed grapes that the local producers of wine usually acumulate and then burn.

I was thinking that all these smashed grapes can be used as organic matter or fertilizer, but which is the best way of using them?

Do you think is a good idea if i throw all the fresh smashed grapes around my land? Or is it better is i first let them dry? Or maybe is better to produce compost with them?
A local farmer told me that i can burn them and use the ash?

Can i use directly the fresh smashed grapes , or what do you recommend me?
 
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pollinator
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Location: Victoria BC
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I think you may have issues with attracting a lot of wildlife if you spread all that pomace around fresh, animals that like to eat grapes and could pose a future problem...

I would think the best use would be to compost it and apply the compost where needed, or you could bury it and allow it to compost underground where it won't attract so many things. It seems very wasteful to me to burn it and use only the ashes.

I wonder if the burning is simply convenient and/or traditional, or if there is a pest-control reason behind it; anyone know?
 
pollinator
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With it being fall for you now, I think spreading it super think might work, the critters should have enough food elsewhere, esp if it drys/decomposes quickly. Other than than you could compost and then spread the compost later.
 
gardener
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I think compost sounds like a great idea. Since all the sugary juice is removed and you only have the fibrous remains of the grapes, I would expect it to have a naturally good balance of carbon and nitrogen, and moisture, and you might not have to add much of anything else, unless you have something else that you happen to want to compost.

Google "composting pomace" and you'll see heaps of good articles. For example, these look good:
https://winemakermag.com/678-the-pomace-predicament
http://www.goodfruit.com/turning-pomace-into-compost/
 
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Years ago I read an article about organic wines are not organic because most wine makers were using none organic yeast. Grapes have natural yeast on them but its not high enough to create fermentation of the juice quickly. By spreading the used crushed grape skins around the vine it will increase the natural growth of the yeast on the future fruit.
 
gardener
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What, no grappa?
Actually, what about pigs or chickens, turning the pomace into poop seems like the fastest way to make the nutrients available to plants.
 
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