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Need a list of Fire Blight resistant varieties of Apples and Pears

 
Marty Mitchell
Posts: 312
Location: Chesapeake, Virginia
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My area (Coastal SE Virginia) is extremely prone to this disease. I have only found a few varieties so far but want more for planting.

Label them as "Resistant" or "Extremely Resistant"

Here are the ones I have found so far... and how resistant they are allegedly. Just planted them so it will be a while before I find out if it is true.

Enterprise apple - Extremely Resistant
Liberty apple - Resistant

Starking Delicious pear - Resistant


Thanks,

Marty
 
alex Keenan
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As far as I know the key is in the root stock used. We have fire blight in my area. I always order trees grafted on fireblight resistant rootstock.
So you may wish to get good root stock and just graft what you want onto it. grafting is not hard and you can find people who sell grafting woodstock. Check with north american fruit explorers.
 
Marty Mitchell
Posts: 312
Location: Chesapeake, Virginia
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alex Keenan wrote:As far as I know the key is in the root stock used. We have fire blight in my area. I always order trees grafted on fireblight resistant rootstock.
So you may wish to get good root stock and just graft what you want onto it. grafting is not hard and you can find people who sell grafting woodstock. Check with north american fruit explorers.


Roger that. I will check them out. Thanks!


Marty
 
Jd Gonzalez
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Location: Virginia,USA zone 6
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http://www.centuryfarmorchards.com/niche/wildlife.html

Check them out, they specialize in southern varieties.
 
Dan Boone
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In Oklahoma the Kieffer pear (actually a hybrid between Bartlet and an Asian pear) is said to be resistant to fire blight, which is common. Around here the Kieffer is actually sometimes called the "homestead" pear because it's the most likely fruit tree to find still alive and producing on old home sites that have been vacant for decades.

In my own actual experience, the Kieffer pear that was abandoned/neglected on this property for decades is still healthy on secondary spires (central spire is long since gone dead and been turned into woodpecker condominiums) and produced abundant fruit three years ago, which was the year that I found it. Two years ago it got a case of fire blight that blackened half the tree. (I saw other random pear-family trees in the neighborhood that turned totally black that year, and now appear to have died.) Last year the fire blight was minor and much fruit was set, but it all dropped very early in the year for reasons unknown. This year it's looking perfect so far, with heavy fruit set. I estimate this tree dates to the late 1940s, but that's just a guess based on the construction date of the house I think it was originally associated with.
 
Suzy Krone
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hugelkultur
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This was how the Bradford pear was born
 
John Polk
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...the key is in the root stock used.

I tend to agree with this.

The first choice in root stocks is generally size (dwarf, semi-dwarf, etc.), and then cold hardiness.
Also important in selection are disease resistance, soil type, water requirements, anchoring, etc.

There are dozens and dozens of available root stocks. Picking the best choice for your circumstances can be a daunting task. Some nurseries only use one type, while others will offer a wide selection.

Without knowing all of your requirements, I couldn't even begin to offer suggestions. What I do recommend is talking to a local orchard, or better yet, ask your County Extension Agent. He/she should know what works best in your region - minimum winter temps, soil types, rainfall/irrigation, diseases, etc. He has had years of listening to commercial orchardists complaining and/or praising different root stocks. He should know best what works well under your set of circumstances. Better to find out NOW than to wait several years to know if you made a good choice.

 
John Alabarr
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I talked to a Horticulturist one time and he recommenced pouring milk on the infected tree. I did it and it helped. Something to do with the lactobacteria.
 
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