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Grafting Alnus Glutinosa

 
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Greetings!

I was wondering if there are any other tree species that can be grafted onto Alder genus? Since the Alder genus lies inside the Betulaceae family, is it possible that I could graft hazelnut (corylus avelana) onto Alnus glutinosa trees?

Please help
 
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Location: Lake Whatcom and the Acme Valley Washington State
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This is exactly what I will be attempting this month in nw washington.
I will be grafting multiple scions into the trunks of established alders on our property.
At the same time I will be topping these trees to slow them from their eventual toppling.
I hope to see a mature rootstock from the alder and production of nuts from the filbert.
I have been eyeing this for about 1 year now and then I came across your post.
Have you attempted this yet?
 
Tracy Diller
Posts: 23
Location: Lake Whatcom and the Acme Valley Washington State
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My grafting of hazelnut scions into the trunks of indigenous alders here have proved successful.
I should have pictures in a couple days
 
gardener
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Location: France, Burgundy, parc naturel Morvan
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Excellent Tracy! Well done for trying and having a first success. I think a hazelnut powered by the rootsystem of an Alnus is going to produce something amazing. Looking forward to pictures and future updates!!
 
Tracy Diller
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Location: Lake Whatcom and the Acme Valley Washington State
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I was until last week I wasn't sure these hazel nut scions branches were going to take.  Now I am looking forward to decreasing the height of these two alder trees and making plans to install several more small branches this winter.  These nuts will be for our forest friends.

Birches are next.
20200426_131329.jpg
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Tracy Diller
Posts: 23
Location: Lake Whatcom and the Acme Valley Washington State
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Here are a few other pictures of the grafted alder trees
20200426_131254.jpg
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20200426_131339.jpg
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20200426_131346.jpg
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20200426_131323.jpg
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20200426_131248.jpg
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pollinator
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Location: acadian peninsula, New Brunswick, Canada
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I'm impressed, I had no idea this stuff was possible! How does this work? Just drill a hole and plug it with a stick? And what's that black paint? I need to learn how to do this!
 
Tracy Diller
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Location: Lake Whatcom and the Acme Valley Washington State
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Hi Francis, yes it is that simple.   Find a suitable branch that you want to use as a scion.   Make sure it has at least 3 dormant buds. Then cut several inches below the lowest bud.
Find a drill bit that is just about the same diameter.  Drill into the trunk where you want the scion to go.
Here is the important part.   The larger the scion the deeper the hole.  So I placed my scions into the trunks about 4 inches deep.  I know the scion needs to self support itself so the deeper insert regulations that. Then strip the bark from the scion as deep as the hole is in the trunk.   Try putting some nail polish or paint at the 4 inch point on the drill and this will help for depth consistency and lining up the cambrian of the trunk to the scion.
Then simply and gently tap the scion into the hole in the trunk.
Stop tapping when the cambrian no longer is visible.
Spray the scion and the trunk around the area of penetration..
Your done.
As a alternative I also took rooting hormone on ½ off the scions and simply drove them in with the powder on it.
As of today I see no benefit...yet.
You will find some of your drilled holes too narrow so if they don't go in easily with gentle taps stop, remove the scion and drill it again but wobble the drill bit slightly.
Just a technique that I am sure you will improve on.
Good luck
Ps the paint is a spray on tree pruning sealer.
gift
 
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