• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Looking For Land Anywhere in USA  RSS feed

 
Kyle James
Posts: 11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I currently live in Union City, CA working for a bank, living frugally, saving $. I should have nearly 10K by February. I am wondering if anyone knows of land for sale right now that is priced under 10K. Also, does anyone know of any websites that list land for sale by the owner to where I would not need to deal with banks. Thank you for any help!
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
Posts: 4434
Location: North Central Michigan
10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
we sold our property over craigslist..

Michigan is a good place to buy right now with the 14 % unemployment and high forclosure rate, land is selling for next to nothing..try Northern Michigan Craigslist real estate section
 
Kyle James
Posts: 11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks. Craigslist is awesome, I found some land in Oregon where I plan on moving next year. I am seeking land as close to Bend, OR as possible as I am planning to assist a family in their cob cottage workshops and holistic/natural living workshops.

I also want everyone in OR reading this post who is interested in cob building to contact me as we could start a cob-building work party together and help build each other's homes!
 
Perry Way
Posts: 65
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Kylejamesp81 wrote:
I currently live in Union City, CA working for a bank, living frugally, saving $. I should have nearly 10K by February. I am wondering if anyone knows of land for sale right now that is priced under 10K. Also, does anyone know of any websites that list land for sale by the owner to where I would not need to deal with banks. Thank you for any help!


If you spend the time I spent to locate the right seller, you can get 2.5 acres in California Valley for less than $5000.  If you wait until the right moment you can find for half that.  California Valley is in eastern San Luis Obispo County amidst the Carrizo Plain.  It's not for everyone, but if you or anyone is interested I will help you find a lot.  The best part about California Valley is there are more than 300 days of sunshine (the largest solar farm was constructed there in the past and in the future will be three solar farms).
 
Kyle James
Posts: 11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Off The Grid wrote:
If you spend the time I spent to locate the right seller, you can get 2.5 acres in California Valley for less than $5000.  If you wait until the right moment you can find for half that.  California Valley is in eastern San Luis Obispo County amidst the Carrizo Plain.  It's not for everyone, but if you or anyone is interested I will help you find a lot.  The best part about California Valley is there are more than 300 days of sunshine (the largest solar farm was constructed there in the past and in the future will be three solar farms).



I am very interested in land in CA as well. Could you provide me with some additional assistance in this task? May I contact you by email to chat more? Thanks
 
Perry Way
Posts: 65
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Kylejamesp81 wrote:

I am very interested in land in CA as well. Could you provide me with some additional assistance in this task? May I contact you by email to chat more? Thanks


Sure thing.  I'll send you a private message with my email address.
 
                    
Posts: 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
ABOUT CALIFORNIA VALLEY...
Please be aware that there is always a reason why specific land prices seem remarkably low, particularly in California. CA Valley is extremely isolated, with few services and some difficulty with access as most roads are unpaved (though maintained by the county). It is a four-season environment, with regular frosts and some snow in the winter, very hot summers (temps well over 100 are not unusual, and the average in summer is probably in the low 90s), but gorgeous spring and autumn weather.

The main issue, and probably the largest reason for bargain-priced lots, is the combination of a lack of water and poor quality water if it is available at all. There are specific areas where water is USUALLY available and USUALLY good quality and enough for living and agricultural usage. 2.5 acre parcels in these areas will cost you anywhere from $15,000 to $20,000 and up. Improved lots, with a well already in place and some sort of home to live in, will run between $40,000 and $200,000.

Yes, you can buy property for $5,000 for 2.5 acres...but it will almost certainly have no access to water, and may also be in an area with no maintained roads, dirt or otherwise. DO NOT buy land out here without personally inspecting the lot in question and having it tested for water quality and access, as well as other items of importance to you.

And BTW, it is a 45-minute drive to the nearest very small town with gas, groceries, etc. More like 70 minutes to an actual small city (San Luis Obispo). All of these factors affect the price of land.

DISCLAIMER: I am a licensed real estate agent, and deal in property in CA Valley. For that reason, it is important that this area be honestly represented. There are several successful farms and ranches in the valley, but the property cost far more than $5000, and improvements added to the value and usefulness of the land. BUYER BEWARE!
 
Kyle James
Posts: 11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you for the post! Some of us do not have 200,000 and so being able to afford any piece of land on this beautiful planet is of great value to some of us regardless of road conditions and temperatures. Our ancestors and many indigenous people around the world have thrived in worse conditions. Still, I do value your honest assessment.

As far as water, there are springs all over CA where water can be hauled in from. Check out www.findaspring.com

For me personally, living on ANY piece of land that is my own would be substantially more beneficial to me than paying rent (paying another persons bils) for the rest of my life, and more preferable to me than working a 9-5 job that I hate until I'm 65 and dying without ever really having time to LIVE.

Again, just my personal perspective on things. I definately will be buying land next year. I am 30 and do not want to waste anymore of my life working for the 'uncle' without having anything to call 'my own'.
 
Perry Way
Posts: 65
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
SLOrealestate wrote:
ABOUT CALIFORNIA VALLEY...
Please be aware that there is always a reason why specific land prices seem remarkably low, particularly in California. CA Valley is extremely isolated, with few services and some difficulty with access as most roads are unpaved (though maintained by the county). It is a four-season environment, with regular frosts and some snow in the winter, very hot summers (temps well over 100 are not unusual, and the average in summer is probably in the low 90s), but gorgeous spring and autumn weather.

The main issue, and probably the largest reason for bargain-priced lots, is the combination of a lack of water and poor quality water if it is available at all. There are specific areas where water is USUALLY available and USUALLY good quality and enough for living and agricultural usage. 2.5 acre parcels in these areas will cost you anywhere from $15,000 to $20,000 and up. Improved lots, with a well already in place and some sort of home to live in, will run between $40,000 and $200,000.

Yes, you can buy property for $5,000 for 2.5 acres...but it will almost certainly have no access to water, and may also be in an area with no maintained roads, dirt or otherwise. DO NOT buy land out here without personally inspecting the lot in question and having it tested for water quality and access, as well as other items of importance to you.

And BTW, it is a 45-minute drive to the nearest very small town with gas, groceries, etc. More like 70 minutes to an actual small city (San Luis Obispo). All of these factors affect the price of land.

DISCLAIMER: I am a licensed real estate agent, and deal in property in CA Valley. For that reason, it is important that this area be honestly represented. There are several successful farms and ranches in the valley, but the property cost far more than $5000, and improvements added to the value and usefulness of the land. BUYER BEWARE!


Well... that ought to scare them away!  Most of the things you mention, the 4 seasons, the remote location, those things are music to my ears!  Go ahead and scare them away because I like a vast remote wilderness view! 

By the way, obtaining water is not a problem where my property is.  It is only 90 feet down and plentiful.  I'll have to get a reverse osmosis water filter to reduce the brackish quality, but that's not a big deal.  You can get a very nice filter these days for a real decent price.  It is affordable for most people, even people on fixed incomes can budget it in.

I would say the single most sizable problem per se, is the roads in wet weather.  Even a half inch of rain will render a good deal of the roads impassible due to the high clay content.  Believe me, I've tried   I dug a 1.75 mile trench down Clarksburg Road two weekends ago because I made a stupid mistake of going down it instead of taking the longer trip down Arrowbear.  But even in the worst rainy weather out there, I can still get to my property without spinning tires or throwing mud all over the place.  The roads with the problems in wet weather are that way from lack of use.  But not to worry, all you have to do is wait until the sun comes out, usually in the same day, and in that case a few hours later and the roads are hard enough to travel on again.  I don't quite consider that a real problem for the person who wants to escape the maddening world of city living.  The benefits, in my opinion, far outweigh the negatives.  As you mentioned, spring is something else!  WOW is the word!  The Carrizo Plain, which California Valley is located on, is 60 miles long and it is nearly solid wildflowers for at least 3 weeks of spring.  This year lasted 3 months of wildflowers!  And even in late summer, the stinky sage and several varieties of tumbleweeds were in FULL bloom!
 
Kathleen Sanderson
Posts: 985
Location: Near Klamath Falls, Oregon
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Off The Grid wrote:
Well... that ought to scare them away!  Most of the things you mention, the 4 seasons, the remote location, those things are music to my ears!  Go ahead and scare them away because I like a vast remote wilderness view! 

By the way, obtaining water is not a problem where my property is.  It is only 90 feet down and plentiful.  I'll have to get a reverse osmosis water filter to reduce the brackish quality, but that's not a big deal.  You can get a very nice filter these days for a real decent price.  It is affordable for most people, even people on fixed incomes can budget it in.


I live near California, and could easily afford land just over the border, but have heard that building permits in California are extremely expensive.  Do you have any input on that?

kathleen
 
                    
Posts: 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you for the post! Some of us do not have 200,000 and so being able to afford any piece of land on this beautiful planet is of great value to some of us regardless of road conditions and temperatures. Our ancestors and many indigenous people around the world have thrived in worse conditions. Still, I do value your honest assessment.

I certainly understand your desire to own your own property, especially since I'm a Realtor and involved daily in helping people purchase their own homes or land. And, as I said, I do have listings in CA Valley. If I were a cynic, I'd be happy to encourage one and all to buy a piece just because it's so cheap. A fair amount of CA Valley is habitable and easy to farm or ranch--but the $5000 lots are not. If you can only afford $5000, why not look into other areas where conditions and opportunities are better? There are acres and acres of decent land available in other states, and even in CA in different areas, that could be had for that price or even less...with access, potable water, etc. A good lot in CA Valley, with potable water and decent access, can be had for far less than $200,000. Maybe around $20,000-$40,000, without a cabin or dwelling on it.

As far as water, there are springs all over CA where water can be hauled in from. Check out www.findaspring.com

I did, and thanks for the tip. There are no springs located anywhere near CA Valley, but it's a useful tool that I will pass on to folks looking for raw land.
 
                    
Posts: 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Off The Grid wrote:
Well... that ought to scare them away!  Most of the things you mention, the 4 seasons, the remote location, those things are music to my ears!  Go ahead and scare them away because I like a vast remote wilderness view! 

I agree, actually, and I love going out there to visit, especially during wildflower season or when the whooping cranes visit Soda Lake. But the reality is that no matter how far off the grid you are (or want to be), there are some things you will still need, like gas for your vehicle, medical attention, some groceries, etc. I can't swear to it, but I rather doubt that UPS goes out there, and I understand that people don't get mail delivery to their houses. You can get it at an unlocked postal station in the valley with open drawers, not locked boxes, or you can get a standard post office box in Atascadero or Santa Margarita.

By the way, obtaining water is not a problem where my property is.  It is only 90 feet down and plentiful.  I'll have to get a reverse osmosis water filter to reduce the brackish quality, but that's not a big deal.  You can get a very nice filter these days for a real decent price.  It is affordable for most people, even people on fixed incomes can budget it in.

You're lucky that water is available fairly close to the surface. You must live at the Soda Lake end of the Valley, as that is where the brackish water comes from.

I would say the single most sizable problem per se, is the roads in wet weather.... I don't quite consider that a real problem for the person who wants to escape the maddening world of city living.  The benefits, in my opinion, far outweigh the negatives.  As you mentioned, spring is something else!  WOW is the word!  The Carrizo Plain, which California Valley is located on, is 60 miles long and it is nearly solid wildflowers for at least 3 weeks of spring.  This year lasted 3 months of wildflowers!  And even in late summer, the stinky sage and several varieties of tumbleweeds were in FULL bloom!


I've avoided driving out there in wet weather, because I drive a Prius sedan and I'm not sure that it is built for mud.  

Some other facts of interest: There are plans for at least two "solar farms" in the Valley, which will make land more valuable. One may actually start construction in 2011; it's going through the final approval process right now.

Cell service is very unreliable and most companies don't seem to have any service at all. I have Verizon, and I'm the only person I know who is able to regularly make and receive calls out there. This is definitely a factor of interest, unless you don't care about being able to summon help in an emergency or any other form of contact.

Really, I don't want to scare people away, I just don't want folks to think they can slap down $5000 or so and magically have a working homestead. An understanding of the realities of life in CA Valley will help people make an informed decision about buying land out there.
 
                    
Posts: 0
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Kathleen, the link below is to the San Luis Obispo County Building Department (which would handle permits in CA Valley) and gives a table of approximate building fees. I would suggest that if you are interested in land in other areas, that you search their building department websites for similar information. Rural counties and small towns have far less expensive permits, as they do not support the kind of infrastructure that you have in a large city. SLO County is probably somewhere in the middle. It's more to build in L.A., and probably a lot less in, say, Modoc County. I hope this helps!

http://www.slocounty.ca.gov/Assets/PL/pdfs/Residential+Construction+Permit+Fees+7-08.pdf
 
Kathleen Sanderson
Posts: 985
Location: Near Klamath Falls, Oregon
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
SLOrealestate wrote:
Kathleen, the link below is to the San Luis Obispo County Building Department (which would handle permits in CA Valley) and gives a table of approximate building fees. I would suggest that if you are interested in land in other areas, that you search their building department websites for similar information. Rural counties and small towns have far less expensive permits, as they do not support the kind of infrastructure that you have in a large city. SLO County is probably somewhere in the middle. It's more to build in L.A., and probably a lot less in, say, Modoc County. I hope this helps!

http://www.slocounty.ca.gov/Assets/PL/pdfs/Residential+Construction+Permit+Fees+7-08.pdf


Thanks -- I'll do some checking.  Siskiyou or Modoc counties are the closest to me (I'm in Klamath County in Oregon).

Kathleen
 
Perry Way
Posts: 65
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
SLOrealestate wrote:
I've avoided driving out there in wet weather, because I drive a Prius sedan and I'm not sure that it is built for mud.  


heheh heheh.  Mud is a real problem on about half the roads in California Valley, and not just dirt mud this is the alkaline clay mud, the kind that is pretty dang slippery.  If you're lucky like me though, you'll score a lot right on a well packed road and you will have year round access pretty much without any bother.


SLOrealestate wrote:
Some other facts of interest: There are plans for at least two "solar farms" in the Valley, which will make land more valuable. One may actually start construction in 2011; it's going through the final approval process right now.


The Jury's still not out.  There is a lot of deliberating going on.  If you ask me I think this is all to convenient, because each time something is in dispute the County makes another couple of million dollars.  They charged I think it was over 1.5 million dollars to do the environmental impact study, which... interestingly enough turned up some kangaroo rat cities underground and so they are afraid the kangaroo rats will not be able to figure out how to move their cities so now they are using that as a way to squeeze the value producers.  At least that's how I see it.  The sad thing about this is they do not plan to hire any locals, they are importing them.  And they do not plan to house them in California Valley either.  So, the County is really going to lose out in several ways all because of their greed problem. The payback is the tax dollars go to another county, the increase in property value taxes from new construction goes out the window to Kern County.  So.. Like I said, the Jury is still deliberating.  Sun could decide not to build because they are required to pay through the nose and to reduce their size.  I find this astonishing that such a Green part of California can't see this governmental roadblock that they, the government manifested.  Has to be greed.  Who can extract values the quickest is the one rewarded.  Sad.

SLOrealestate wrote:
Cell service is very unreliable and most companies don't seem to have any service at all. I have Verizon, and I'm the only person I know who is able to regularly make and receive calls out there. This is definitely a factor of interest, unless you don't care about being able to summon help in an emergency or any other form of contact.


Yeah I do not know what I'm going to do about internet yet.  When Sun builds their plant, they are going to be paving quite a number of roads actually.  And whatever roads they pave are going to get Wi-Fi on the power poles.  That was yet another value the government extracts from Sun.  But perhaps I will be off the grid in all ways.  I am planning to move onto my property real soon.  By year's end is how I'm thinking, I should be able to.  I'm going to be off the grid in every angle possible.  I might like the off the grid aspect regarding internet, and just deal with it during the day at work.  If not, then I might have to pony up to pay to have the fiber optic phone service brought up to my street and get DSL. It's not far from me actually.  Two lots over to the south, or one lot over to the east.  Maybe I'll get a land line too just so I have a way to call those cops you talked about and wait an hour for them to show up.    Hey, this land is not for everybody.  If you have money you only live out there because you want the solitude and to hear the birds.  Most others are there because they cannot afford high priced California real estate.

SLOrealestate wrote:
Really, I don't want to scare people away, I just don't want folks to think they can slap down $5000 or so and magically have a working homestead. An understanding of the realities of life in CA Valley will help people make an informed decision about buying land out there. [/color]


Yeah that's not going to happen overnight.  I'm doing a pay as you go thing, with cash, no loans.  I don't want to be slaving for a living, so I'm going to be responsible for my life in as many ways I can.  California Valley is wonderful place for that because it's easier to stay low profile there.

I am working with a popular guy on Youtube right now who is trying to make a positive improvement in the world and in this economy.  We are kind of mulling this idea around to buy a whole block of lots, and do a shared community in the center part where we garden the land, etc.  An intentional community but not a commune thing. Everyone owns their own individual lots kind of thing.  And he thinks he can muster the investment money by working up a series of videos on Youtube.  So stay tuned.. I might come back here with a video link in about a month.
 
Perry Way
Posts: 65
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Kathleen Sanderson wrote:
I live near California, and could easily afford land just over the border, but have heard that building permits in California are extremely expensive.  Do you have any input on that?

kathleen


I have input on this but this won't work for everyone, especially the timid.  Don't get any permits. Just do your thing. Be sovereign.  God made you a human being.  Humans need homes to live in.  The government shouldn't require you be a slave.  This is USA.  Land of the ... what again?

Not for everyone. I know.  A couple hundred years ago there were only about 10% of the population as the brave people who wrested this country from the claws of King George.  That's about where things stand today.  I'm part of that 10%, might as well be clear about it.

I'm going off the grid in every way.  Off the grid permits.  Off the grid well.  Off the grid everything.  I'll pay the real estate tax because I'm not yet able to fight that in court, but some time down the line I'll be attempting to do that very thing.

If you're an independent spirit, and have that pioneer ability like you have a lot of talent and ability to do things, take care of yourself, you can also work with the system but to your advantage.  By that I mean some creative look at how to build your home.  You could build a series of small storage buildings which you convert later on to dwelling spaces.  You could get creative with how they are positioned so that at a later time you could extend more walls between them to make a courtyard.  Doing this conversion slowly will not arouse the slave masters.  Over a long period of time you can build a nice layout that way and then if the slave masters come after you for living in a non-living space, you can go scream to the newspapers, TV stations, and Amnesty International.  Go blab it to the world that the land of the free is really not anything free at all.  Certainly not free in cost.  But even the idea of you able to build your home to live on and that being taken away from you is a very foreign idea to all the other countries in the world except for Britain and Western most part of Europe.  Everywhere else in the world, common sense is applied to living space.  Everyone needs a home and if you own the land, you should be able to build yourself a hut and live in it if you want to.

My idea assumes that a person is responsible.
 
Perry Way
Posts: 65
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
SLOrealestate wrote:
....There are no springs located anywhere near CA Valley, but it's a useful tool that I will pass on to folks looking for raw land.[/color]



There are some springs. I know where some are. You have to have the Los Padres National Forest maps to see them but they are there.  The area I'm talking about is the Santa Lucia Ranger District, which runs up to Paso Robles almost, and down south to the Sisquoc River area.  That whole section of forest land is dotted with hot springs and regular springs.  The closest spring to California Valley is still on the Carrizo Plain but it is seasonal.  Nearer to Pozo and Santa Margarita is where most of the springs are that are closest to California Valley.
 
                                          
Posts: 95
Location: Ferndale, MI- Zone 5b
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Off The Grid wrote:My idea assumes that a person is responsible.


good luck!  there's nothing i like more than an underdog anarchist taking on the system.  but i think your assumption clearly illustrates the need for regulation of activities (whether that be by individuals or organizations) that have clearly negative externalities.  few people are responsible.
 
Kathleen Sanderson
Posts: 985
Location: Near Klamath Falls, Oregon
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Off The Grid wrote:
I have input on this but this won't work for everyone, especially the timid.  Don't get any permits. Just do your thing. Be sovereign.  God made you a human being.  Humans need homes to live in.  The government shouldn't require you be a slave.  This is USA.  Land of the ... what again?

Not for everyone. I know.  A couple hundred years ago there were only about 10% of the population as the brave people who wrested this country from the claws of King George.  That's about where things stand today.  I'm part of that 10%, might as well be clear about it.

I'm going off the grid in every way.  Off the grid permits.  Off the grid well.  Off the grid everything.  I'll pay the real estate tax because I'm not yet able to fight that in court, but some time down the line I'll be attempting to do that very thing.

If you're an independent spirit, and have that pioneer ability like you have a lot of talent and ability to do things, take care of yourself, you can also work with the system but to your advantage.  By that I mean some creative look at how to build your home.  You could build a series of small storage buildings which you convert later on to dwelling spaces.  You could get creative with how they are positioned so that at a later time you could extend more walls between them to make a courtyard.  Doing this conversion slowly will not arouse the slave masters.  Over a long period of time you can build a nice layout that way and then if the slave masters come after you for living in a non-living space, you can go scream to the newspapers, TV stations, and Amnesty International.  Go blab it to the world that the land of the free is really not anything free at all.  Certainly not free in cost.   But even the idea of you able to build your home to live on and that being taken away from you is a very foreign idea to all the other countries in the world except for Britain and Western most part of Europe.  Everywhere else in the world, common sense is applied to living space.  Everyone needs a home and if you own the land, you should be able to build yourself a hut and live in it if you want to.

My idea assumes that a person is responsible.


I don't consider myself necessarily timid, but I hate the thought of putting months or years of work into building a house, only to have some government  agency find out about it and order it torn down.  Especially when I have a handicapped daughter to care for and house....In theory I agree that we ought to be able to build basic shelter on our own land, but in reality, as long as you have to pay property taxes for the 'privilege' of living there, you don't own the land anyway. 

Kathleen
 
                                    
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Kyle,

There are number of options for you. Brenda has good experience with craigslist ( as she said). You can find other good real estate agents or companies in every corner of USA. I think you don't need to be worried. Its just a matter of time. One suggestion from my side-think twice before taking any property. Think about its locality, cost and future value for sure.
Good Luck!

 
Walter Jeffries
Posts: 1091
Location: Mountains of Vermont, USDA Zone 3
44
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Kylejamesp81 wrote:
I currently live in Union City, CA working for a bank, living frugally, saving $. I should have nearly 10K by February. I am wondering if anyone knows of land for sale right now that is priced under 10K. Also, does anyone know of any websites that list land for sale by the owner to where I would not need to deal with banks. Thank you for any help!


My suggestion would be to look in places other people don't want to live. More rural. Fewer services. Rugged terrain. Steep. These all keep the price down.

However, make sure you have water, mineral rights, no rights of way you can't live with, access and what ever else it is you personally need.

We bought our land in the late 1980's so prices were a bit lower than now. However, I could have bought in places where the prices were 100x higher just a dozen miles away. Small changes in location can make a huge difference in price.

Unfortunately $10K is no longer very much. A single acre starts at $20K to $60K. The good news is the next nine acres generally only cost another $20 to $60K. In other words, buying in volume makes a big difference in price.

There is another factor that you had best watch out for: Zoning. You can buy something but can you built there?

Best of luck with all of your dreams - make them happen one step at a time.

Cheers

-Walter
Sugar Mountain Farm
Pastured Pigs, Sheep & Kids
in the mountains of Vermont
Read about our on-farm butcher shop project:
http://SugarMtnFarm.com/butchershop
http://SugarMtnFarm.com/csa
 
Steven Baxter
Posts: 258
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Does anyone live in San Bernardino County? Land seems to be pretty cheap there. May be similar to CA Valley, being mostly desert.

 
Something about .... going for a swim. With this tiny ad ...
FT Position Available: Affiliate Manager Who Loves Permaculture & Homesteading
https://permies.com/t/69742/FT-Position-Affiliate-Manager-Loves
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!