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Which short fruit trees/fruit shrubs for a wet soil in a greenhouse zone 7

 
André Troylilas
Posts: 130
Location: North of France
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Hi,

I know this can seem strange, but I'd like to know what kind of fruits can be grown in a wet soil.
I have very good friends who are market gardeners/truck farmers but who struggle to make both ends meet.
This week, their very little plot of land (1.2 acre) got flooded (which will lead me to a lot of other questions, but this is for another thread).
Some part of the plot is regularly full of water because of the slopes. For the time being, no major work can be done (and no permie with a PDC around here).
So, I thought we could build some kind of hugelkultur beds and plant some fruit shrubs or fruit trees because this part is often wet and at the end of the plot...
The vegetables are from the very beginning of the plot to just in front of this part of the plot.
And if the bed is high enough, there would be something to sell even when the plot gets flooded.

With the shrubs or small fruit trees, we could install a greenhouse in order to get fruits that are not supposed to grow in zone 7.
Maybe that's total nonsense, I just don't know.

They could grow some bot reed, but there is no market for this plant, to me that looks like survival food.

Anyway, don't hesitate to kick me in the head if you think this is total bs.

Thanks.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Posts: 1992
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Wet feet and fruit trees do not go together. For a boggy section of land I would look at berries that like to live in boggy land.
The alternative would be to plant a few eucalyptus trees ( they are great as drying out soggy land ).
 
André Troylilas
Posts: 130
Location: North of France
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Thanks Bryant.
I've just seen that but didn't know about those rootstocks a few minutes ago.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Posts: 1992
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
152
chicken dog forest garden hugelkultur hunting toxin-ectomy
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Those will be good rootstocks for your area, What would be wonderful is if you can find trees already grafted to those rootstocks.

The reason for wanting to find them ready to go is that you won't have to wait the two years from graft to first fruiting.

Even Though nurseries advertise that you get fruit faster with grafted trees, they fail to mention that the grafted trees spend two to three years developing prior to shipping to nurseries.
That is why they fruit faster, of course you can also buy older fruit trees that are on their own roots and those will fruit for you just like the grafts since they are old enough to bear when available to the nurseries.

If you plant say a peach pit and it sprouts, that will take seven years to bear fruit, the main thing a graft does is give you a better root system, if the scion was three years old when grafted to the new roots,
then it will be 4 years to fruiting instead of seven. Some trees respond a year faster. Most grafts to fruit trees (commercially done grafts) are to dwarf root stock, this keeps the size of the adult down to 15-20 feet,
but the trees will not live for hundreds of years like an on own roots tree might. However, since none of us tend to live for centuries, it really isn't something to worry about.

We have both, grafted and non-grafted fruit trees, interestingly all our trees fruit the same since we buy older on own root trees and our grafted trees were already 6 years old when we bought them.

Next year I will be taking cuttings for rooting from our pear and apple trees to expand the orchard. We are lucky in that we have no need of grafting root stock unless we just want to do it.
I used to graft up to 10,000 trees a year but now I usually graft for fun, creating trees with many varieties of apples on one tree is pretty cool. I may even get into doing the same with pear trees in the next few years.
 
André Troylilas
Posts: 130
Location: North of France
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Wow, impressing!
I've been grafting for years, but not that many grafts a year (ten at most).
I don't think it will be easy finding a nursery that could provide interesting cultivars with these rootstocks.
I am part of a grafter network, and will try to find these rootstocks.
Thanks.
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Posts: 1992
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
152
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My family used to have a commercial fruit tree nursery.
That's the only way you should get to those high numbers of grafts per year, and probably the only reason to do so.
The good thing about grafting all day long, every day is that you get really proficient at it.

I think it is better to learn on your own though, that way you can try all the different methods and pick the ones that work best for your stocks and for you.
It also means you will probably have less loss due to failed grafts. when your trying to up production, you will make small mistakes that will end up costly because of failures or on occasion a badly formed graft (ugly does count against sales).
 
John Wolfram
Posts: 640
Location: Lafayette, Indiana
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"short" trees and "flooded" usually do not do well together. That being said, some fruit trees are more flood tolerant than others. I have found that most can take a good deal of flooding while dormant, but if you are expecting a week of flooding in the summer I would recommend looking into pears and persimmons. More information can be found here:
http://permies.com/t/48074/trees/Relative-Flood-Tolerance-Dormant-Fruit
 
André Troylilas
Posts: 130
Location: North of France
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Great, thanks John!
I was thinking of short trees on a hugelkultur mound...
 
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