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Coppice Agroforestry

 
tel jetson
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David Jacke, the author (with Eric Toensmeier) of Edible Forest Gardens, is working on a new book and trying to fund the manuscript through kickstarter.  have a look:
Dave & Mark write "Coppice Agroforestry"
 
Valerie Dawnstar
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I expect this to be another awesome and highly useful book.  I respect that they have decided to self publish.  I think we should try to support this work.  Even just 5 or ten dollars would be a big help for them.  I plan to do so with my next payday.   -And, no, I'm not related to either of them.   
 
tel jetson
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I think they've got a publisher, they're just funding the manuscript with kickstarter instead of taking an advance.  that's my understanding, anyhow.
 
Valerie Dawnstar
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Oops!  You're right!  I read it too fast.  I was excited to see they have surpassed their original goal and are now shooting for the "fully funded" goal.  Go Mark and Dave!
 
Jan Sebastian Dunkelheit
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I did not know that coppicing was widely unknown to north americans. Fascinating! I coppice my forest in Germany for firewood. I use mainly beech, birch, maple and oak there.

A combination of a coppicing forest and a fruit forest is my goal. Haven't really started alltough I have some wild currents growing, haha.

Coppicing forests allows more sunlight to penetrate the tree tops and reach the ground. They therefore have a big potential for saving biodiversity whilst being useful for human needs, e.g. firewood, timber, mushrooms, fruits and berries. Coppicing forest allow everything to grow from trees to shrubs. Great human made ecosystems!
 
Paul Cereghino
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Dunkelheit wrote:
I did not know that coppicing was widely unknown to north americans. Fascinating! I coppice my forest in Germany for firewood. I use mainly beech, birch, maple and oak there.


Don't get your hopes up too high We just recently stopped playing cowboys and Indians and still think that ecosystems don't involve people.  Jacke is still way ahead of the mainstream, and most people burn timber for fuel, and buy wattles from China.
 
Jan Sebastian Dunkelheit
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Was this irony? You didn't stop playing it, did you? In Germany and France, where I live most of the time, coppicing is a mainly forgotten practice. Biodiverstiy is in rushing decline here because of that. Nobody seems to care. They still think sprouce monocultures are great in areas where normally beech and oaks grow. Stupid, stupid people.
 
Brenda Groth
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i have an order in to the library to get me his Edible forest Gardening books..hope they come soon..need INPUT..

I also will be interested in seeing the coppicing book, as I have some interest in coppicing some of our forest trees now that I'm more aware of the usefulness of copppicing as per reading these forums.

I'm thinking alder might be a good coppice tree for us..we have a lot growing and I'm thinking it might make some good smaller firewood and possibly other uses..still need to get my head around what I can use it for..but it does grow back from the roots quite easily and quickly.

we also have a lot of willow growing here and if I can find a good use for the wood I could coppice that and possibly some aspens, although they do sucker horribly..and die off when injured so I'm not sure about them.
 
Jan Sebastian Dunkelheit
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Alder is good for coppcing and it is okay to heat with. Lower heat value than birch but great to split into logs.
Aspen trees hate coppicing. Their leaves take years to degrade and their wood is poor in every aspect. Takes long to dry, no heating value, too soft to build with... BUT. Some butterflies depend on them. So don't cut them all.
 
                  
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I have a question about stimulating a 2-3 year old tree to coppice behavior.  I cannot, for many reasons, cut it down.  However, from my reading it might be possible to damage the tree in such a manner that it would send out coppice shoots.

Does anyone know the biology well enough to know whether and how deep to "damage" the tree?  It is of a species that will happily coppice if cut in this age range.  I have two trees to work with.

Any ideas?  Suggestions?  I know this is a strange request but I'm working within some strict boundaries.

Thanks!
 
tel jetson
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what's the tree?

sometimes root damage will cause suckering.  cutting a young tree about halfway through the stem, tipping it over, and pinning it down can give you more stems.
 
Brenda Groth
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all this study has gotten my juices flowing for coppicing my alder and willow and possibly others, and to try to figure out what to do with the materials once they are down besides just burning them for firewood.

In the video he shows furniture and fences that caught my eye, I have a book on making rustic furniture and buildings..but am getting old and not sure if it is a place to plan for in my future or not..we do however heat with firewood.

there was some information on coppicing in vol  1 of Edible forest gardens (yes I got the first volume from the library Sat and finished reading it today)..it has me thinking for sure..i see now that if i was to coppice my alder, which is east and some south of my forest, that it would allow tons of sunlight to the forest floor, which might give me an opportunity to grow more under the canopy of aspen, w cherry, maple and ash that are growing there..but I'll make those decisions after reading vol 2 and making my decisions more informed..

I'm learning more about disturbances from the books as well and learning that disturbances need to be planned as best you can and have a use for the land when you disturb it rather than just wasting all that energy that will result..

yup..i did read every word of the book
 
Brian Bales
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looks like they met their goal 4 times over. Well done. So whens the book come out?
 
David Hartley
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Does anyone know when the book will be available for purchase? I soooo want a copy!
 
Lyvia Dequincey
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I read that willow and alder can be fodder for livestock, but I have also read they are difficult to digest. I have to subdivide my pasture, so I was thinking of adding a narrow swale with willow or alder that could be browsed from both sides. But I wonder if that would hide predators too well. The canes from either could be woven for wattle fencing or baskets or shade panels. I might make wattle fencing with hardware cloth behind it for my chickens. Someday, that is. I'm off to a slow start here.
 
David Hartley
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I don't know about Willow; but Alder rots really fast. Well; here on the Pacific NW coast, it does... Just something to be aware of.
 
Jose Reymondez
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Mark was my PDC teacher, he's great. Can't wait for the book!
 
Robin Hones
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According to Martin Crawford's "Creating a Forest Garden" not all Alders will coppice well.
OK for Alnus Glutinosa (Common/European) and A. Sinuata (Sitka). Not good for A. Cordata (Italian) and A. Rubra (Red)
 
David Hartley
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Ruba will; from what I've read... If done starting when a sapling; then a few rotations can be done, while still young. As is ages though, it is very likely to become infected... From my reading.
 
Alan Whitaker
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So here we are nearly 4 years from the full funding of the kickstarter. Does anyone know when the book be available? I remember the build-up to get the kickstarter funded. Now I feel sort of, let down..............
 
allen lumley
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Google (and some digging ) found me an E-Mail address to send of an inquiry ! When I here back you will too ! Big AL
 
allen lumley
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I got a reply from Mark Krawczk which produced the following www.keylinevermont.com and E-mail at/from keylinevermont@gmail.com

And a phone ! 802 - 999 - 2768 which sounds like a cell phone and ought to be on his person

Gist of his message ''Still editing " probably next year ! If you think you have been waiting long enough send him a rocket ! Big AL
 
Cj Sloane
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They've also got a web site:
http://www.coppiceagroforestry.com/index.html
 
Lucas Harrison-Zdenek
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I am starting to gain interest in coppice for RMH purposes. Are there any species that refuse to coppice to anyone's knowledge?
 
allen lumley
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Cj et all : Your connection was the one I reached out to them on, The 1 I listed is where my answer came from, I am sure that they are working hard, but-
they are very much behind their times ! , Any way they can be reached and have responded to me ! Big AL
 
Cj Sloane
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Lucas Harrison-Zdenek wrote:I am starting to gain interest in coppice for RMH purposes. Are there any species that refuse to coppice to anyone's knowledge?


All broadleaves coppice but some are stronger than others. The strongest are ash, hazel, oak, sweet chestnut and lime whilst the weakest include beech, wild cherry and poplar. Most conifers do not coppice.


Quote from A Brief History of Coppicing
 
I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
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