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Christmas goodies from the garden  RSS feed

 
Burra Maluca
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Location: Portugal
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My other half just emerged from the garden with a box of goodies.



There's some chinese leaves, two sorts of lettuce, radish, landcress, ruby chard and I wonder what that could be in the back there....



Turnips and taters!



Including this very nice pink potato. I think I'm gonna claim that one to have with my Christmas dinner tomorrow. Or maybe we could share it, just this once.



What does everyone else have in their gardens this time of year?
 
Craig Dobbson
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Posts: 2023
Location: Maine (zone 5)
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At this point I'm down to little frozen crab apples that are still clinging on the trees and some greens buried deep under the snow.  If  I put the effort into cracking open the ground, which is also frozen, I could have a pile of sunchokes but I'm trying to let them spread out again. There are a few spots out there where I could probably harvest some fresh oregano and sage, but again... snow and ice.  I'll use what I dried in the fall, rather than go out there and get cold while digging in the ice.  Thankfully I've put up most of the fall harvest and so have plenty of dried, fermented, frozen and fresh veggies to make it til spring.  I've been eating a lot of bush cabbage with our pastured pork and fresh acorn squash recently. 

Today I'm working on a new batch of Italian sausage.
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Home Grown Fresh Italian Sausage
 
Jason Padvorac
Posts: 105
Location: Northeast of Seattle, zone 8: temperate with rainy winters and dry summers.
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We've got plenty of kale, and some carrots. And dreams and schemes for a much bigger winter garden next year!
 
Carma Nykanen
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Location: PNW zone 7
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If you can count the meat birds that are cleaning up the rest of the garden, they'll be harvested next week.  Otherwise there's rutabaga,  collards up high where the birds can't reach,  sage,  oregano, thyme trying to keep going in this wet and frosty place.
I'd like to get that sausage recipe! 
 
Craig Dobbson
steward
Posts: 2023
Location: Maine (zone 5)
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Carma Nykanen wrote:If you can count the meat birds that are cleaning up the rest of the garden, they'll be harvested next week.  Otherwise there's rutabaga,  collards up high where the birds can't reach,  sage,  oregano, thyme trying to keep going in this wet and frosty place.
I'd like to get that sausage recipe! 



Here you are:

4.5 lbs pork shoulder cubed
.5 lbs pork back fat cubed
3 tablespoons kosher salt
2 tablespoons sugar
2 tablespoons fennel seed
3 tablespoons paprika
1 teaspoon cayenne/ancho/chipotle or favorite hot pepper powder
4 tablespoons oregano
4 tablespoons basil
2 tablespoons red pepper flake or other hot pepper
2 teaspoons ground black pepper
4 cloves of garlic minced

combine all of that and let it sit in the fridge for a few hours to let the pork absorb all the flavors and salt
I put it in the freezer after that just till it's icy.  That makes a much nicer grind. Keeping everything cold is sooooo important to making good sausage.

Grind through a course plate into a mixing bowl set on ice

Add 3/4 cup iced water and 1/4 cup red wine.  Mix until the mixture is sticky but not smeary.  You want it to bind together without the fat melting or mixing with the meat.
Stuff into hog casings or just form into patties.
prick the casings all over with a pin to allow air to escape.

twist into 6-8 inch links and refrigerate until relaxed.

Cut into appropriate sized portions (I put 4 links in a pack) and freeze in freezer paper, vacuum bags or waxed paper  OR cook immediately.

I like to cook them slowly in butter and then add them to tomato sauce. 
 
Roberto pokachinni
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Location: Fraser Headwaters, B.C., Zone3, Latitude 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
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4.5 lbs pork shoulder cubed
.5 lbs pork back fat cubed
3 tablespoons kosher salt 


I always find it funny when I see Kosher salt used on Pork.  Just my weird sense of humor. 

My situation is similar to Craig's,
buried deep under the snow. 
but it's even colder here, I think. 

The deer are looking more and more delicious as the winter progresses. 

And dreams and schemes for a much bigger winter garden next year!
me too.  I finally got my glass for building a greenhouse next year.  I have almost all my materials for my RMH that will heat my greenhouse and sauna.  Here's hoping I get both of those done and can grow more in the winter next year.

 
Tracy Wandling
steward
Posts: 1677
Location: Cortes Island, British Columbia. Zone: 8ish Lat: 50; Rainfall: 50" ish; sand and rocks; well water
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Gorgeous goodies, Burra! I too am dreaming of a winter garden next year. This year it's kale and herbs. Next year - everything! 
 
Su Ba
pollinator
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Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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Although most people aren't aware of it, here in Hawaii we have winter too.....and many of the plants know it! So the gardens this time of year are producing many of the typical cool weather veggies : broccoli, cauliflower, turnips, rutabagas, and kohlrabi. I'm also getting beets, chard, carrots, green onions (not the season for bulb onions), kale, daikon, green beans, peas. Warm season crops are either doing poorly or have died back, so I'm seeing much tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, okra, soybean.  The pipinolas are going strong, as is the okinawan spinach. Just harvested the last of sweet corn, yacon, and limas. Winter is citrus season so I've got oranges, lemons, limes, and grape fruits. It's also lilikoi and avocado season. Bananas tend to be year around, but I'm seeing plenty of green bunches up in the trees right now. Some of the guava and papaya trees are going off too. Most of the herbs are doing fine.

No lettuce, how sad. The feral turkeys came through and ate it all.
 
Alex Ames
Posts: 406
Location: Georgia
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How about Christmas tomatoes? Rare around here but I am looking at them!
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Su Ba
pollinator
Posts: 992
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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Wow. And the appropriate colors too....red & green!

No garden tomatoes for me from my garden. How sad. But I did just harvest a big bundle of red beets. I'll steam them up and take them to the big Xmas potluck later on today.
 
Roberto pokachinni
pollinator
Posts: 1507
Location: Fraser Headwaters, B.C., Zone3, Latitude 53N, Altitude 2750', Boreal/Temperate Rainforest-transition
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Today's breakfast was pancakes.  I hope to one day grow my own grain for these purposes, but not yet.

The pancake batter was made with blueberries that were wild harvested, and raspberries which were harvested from the garden, and eggs which were produced locally.

The toppings:  All traded from my crop of garlic.

-Canned pears  (mine just started producing!!!-but not in volume yet).
-Rose hip jam
-Maple syrup
-coconut oil ('traded' with the local health food store which purchases my garlic with cash and I buy stuff)

Beverage:  Green Tea ('traded' as above with the coconut oil) mixed with wild harvested 'Labrador Tea'.
             

 
Maureen Atsali
pollinator
Posts: 399
Location: Western Kenya
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We don't have winter, but we have a dry season that about coincides with American winters.  I consider it my "winter" because not much will grow for the next three months. Bananas keep going year round. We harvested a banana this morning - a non-sweet, starchy variety.  We'll be frying those up with onions and tomatoes. Sweet potatoes are in the ground and will be working away through the drought.  I do have a couple rows that are nearly ready to harvest. I have a little patch of corn that was planted very late.  I am using our recycled gray water to water it by hand, with a watering can.  Just to see if we can actually get a harvest from it.  I have a few more squash out in the fields waiting to be brought in.  And I've planted some leafy green vegetables down in the swamp - jews mallow, sunhemp, black nightshade, cowpeas, amaranth, and cats-whiskers.  I didn't do well this year getting the greens in before the rains stopped, so I don't know if they will get roots down deep enough to survive the drought.
 
Ron Duft
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Location: Alberta,Canada US Hardy:3b Annual Precipitation: 15" Wind: 62mph Temperature:-45F to 86F
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"What does everyone else have in their gardens this time of year?"

Not much, -14F
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Charlie the Lama came to the yard Christmas day
 
Maureen Atsali
pollinator
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hahaha, Charlie the llama is a great garden find!  So cute, I love it!  But I sure don't miss the snow, or the subzero temps!
 
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