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Does walnut juglone get into nearby ponds?

 
steward
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I have a butternut guild that I may put a pond near (butternuts are in the walnut family).  That pond water could then be used on my garden (300' away, down a hill).  I'm assuming some of the butternut leaves will fall in the pond and its roots may interact with the pond water.  Does anyone know if that water would be bad to use on my garden?
 
Mike Haasl
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Bump?
 
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Thank you for bumping this post Mike. Sorry I missed it before.

Juglone is an exudate, it is produced, when competing plants are around, it isn't produced in quantity when all the roots are from the same species, apparently the roots recognize same species and accept them.

Roots that are in or very near the water table generally specialize in water intake, these roots will have more "straws" in their make up than roots involved more with mineral uptake.

I doubt that using pond water would have any ill effects on your garden.

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you could test it out soak some leaves in water and water a plant with it

parts of the plant are use to poison fish i have read
 
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We had a big black walnut tree that was close enough to a pond that nuts and leaves ended up in the pond. Everything seemed to grow just fine.

There have been reports of fish kills in streams and ponds in England when large numbers of horse chestnut shed nuts and leaves into the water. Saponins are the culprit. Naturally occurring soap, just as is found in soap nuts, soap berries and clematis.
 
Mike Haasl
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Thanks everyone!  That's one worry off my list  As long as we're talking juglone, anyone know about northern bayberry and its fondness for juglone?  Bayberry post on Permies
 
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