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Hearthstone soapstone 1 Stove 1983. Should I buy it

 
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I have the opportunity to purchase a used Soap stone Wood burner. It was purchased in 1983 and to be honest it looks brand new on the outside. What should I look for and how much is it worth. I have posted a couple of pictures. I know it doesn't have a caytalist but is such a good looking stove.  They replaced in 2009 because they said it put off to much heat for the space. And stored it in their basement.
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master pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Can you cook on the top?  I love our woodstove because we can cook on it as well as heat the house.

 
Brent Stevens
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Tyler Ludens wrote:Can you cook on the top?  I love our woodstove because we can cook on it as well as heat the house.



They said the top should be at 450 degrees so yes you can cook on it however they suggest a metal grate that lays on the soap stone so you don't scratch it up.
 
pollinator
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Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
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That stove is beautiful.  I would love to have it.  No idea what it is worth however.
 
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I'm not an expert but I'd look for any metal fatigue inside the firebox, or if there is stone inside the firebox I'd look for cracking or spalling, signs of degredation.  I'd examine the outside closely to see if there are any signs of smoke residue where it shouldn't be, especially at the joints, or cracks in the stones or seams.  Make sure all handles and flaps for the flue and air supply are working or repairable, door hinges and latches working and tight.
Things like fiberglass gaskets on the doors can easily be replaced, other items might have to be custom built.
It looks like a beautiful stove, I'd look at the cost vs. my bank statement vs. my dwelling size.
I'd also look at the stove they replaced it with, if it looks like it has a higher output I'd be suspicious, maybe it doesn't put out as much heat as they are suggesting or maybe it isn't efficient enough.
I'd look at the calendar before I make a counter offer, Spring favors a buyer for a woodstove.
Then I'd probably look for my 3 biggest friends to help me carry it out of the basement, it looks heavy.

 
Posts: 120
Location: Southern New Hampshire (Zone 5)
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It is a beautiful stove and likely well-made, as the manufacturer was and is highly respected in the industry.  What are your goals for the stove?  primary home heating?  supplemental heating?  Have you heated with wood before?  How large is your house, and what are your winters like?
The concern I would have with these "pre-EPA" (prior to the early 1990s) is they really weren't designed to burn efficiently.  Hence they would overheat a room when a blazing fire was built.  It was hard to run them low and slow without billowing black smoke (and BTUs) out the chimney.  There is a good discussion forum here if you want advice on that particular model https://www.hearth.com/talk/forums/classic-wood-stove-forums-prior-to-approx-1993.19/
What is the asking price?  Modern, efficient stoves sell for $800 (NC Englander) to $3500 (Woodstock and Blaze King)
 
The moth suit and wings road is much more exciting than taxes. Or this tiny ad:
dry stack step
https://permies.com/t/125100/dry-stack-step
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