• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • paul wheaton
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
  • Joylynn Hardesty
stewards:
  • r ranson
  • James Freyr
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Ash Jackson
  • thomas rubino
  • Carla Burke

What Foods to Use with Dill Seed?

 
master steward
Posts: 3626
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1028
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Actually this is a combination of dried Dill Seed, Red Pepper Flakes, Onion Flakes and Coriander ... What foods will this go with?

If I could sift out the Dill Seed, I could use it for pickling.  I have not figured out how to do that.  Actually that combo might work for pickling.

I would rather find other uses for it.

 
Posts: 7533
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
1393
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Anne Miller wrote:Actually this is a combination of dried Dill Seed, Red Pepper Flakes, Onion Flakes and Coriander ... What foods will this go with?

If I could sift out the Dill Seed, I could use it for pickling.  I have not figured out how to do that.  Actually that combo might work for pickling.

I would rather find other uses for it.



Sounds like a blend that would be tasty in a three bean salad or variations of a hearty salad.
We make a lentil sprout, garbonzo bean, onion, celery salad that always has cayenne flakes and turmeric and garlic...if I had dill seed and coriander on hand they would go in also.

...or with rice?

I don't see any limits...sounds like a good blend
 
steward
Posts: 4065
Location: West Tennessee
1558
cattle cat purity fungi trees books chicken food preservation cooking building homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Anne Miller wrote:Actually this is a combination of dried Dill Seed, Red Pepper Flakes, Onion Flakes and Coriander ... What foods will this go with?

If I could sift out the Dill Seed, I could use it for pickling.  I have not figured out how to do that.  Actually that combo might work for pickling.

I would rather find other uses for it.



That sounds really good. I'd try pickling with that blend just as it is.
 
pollinator
Posts: 842
Location: Southern Oregon
210
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Some ideas I would try, adding to salad dressing, grinding it up for a spice rub on meat/poultry, using in a brine for meat/poultry, grinding it up for dip with sour cream and mayonnaise.

I'm sure I can come up with more, but there's a start.
 
Anne Miller
master steward
Posts: 3626
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1028
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks, everyone for your replies.

These suggestions give me a lot of idea on how to use this mix.  The jar was 18 oz. so I have a lot of it.
 
pollinator
Posts: 4328
Location: Anjou ,France
243
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would try bread

David
 
Anne Miller
master steward
Posts: 3626
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1028
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have found that after trying cooking with dill, I really like this spice.  





Here is a simple recipe that I found that I like for Dill Sauce:

DILL SAUCE:
1/2 cup sour cream
2 tablespoons dill pickle relish
1 teaspoon dill weed



Source


Classic Southern Dilled Green Beans



Ingredients

   4 pounds whole green beans (about 4 quarts)
   1/4 teaspoon crushed hot red pepper (per pint jar)
   1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds (per pint jar)
   1/2 teaspoon dill seeds (or 1 to 2 fresh or frozen dill heads) (per pint jar)
   1 small clove garlic (per pint jar)
   5 cups vinegar
   5 cups water
   1/2 cup pickling salt

Steps to Make It

   Sterilize the jars and keep them in the hot water until you're ready to fill them.

   Put the flat lids in a saucepan and cover with water. Bring just to a simmer. Reduce the heat to the lowest setting and keep them hot until you are ready for them.

   Fill a large canner with water and bring to a boil.

   Meanwhile, trim and wash the green beans thoroughly. Drain them and cut into lengths to fill 1-pint jars (preferably wide-mouth jars).

   Pack beans into sterilized, hot jars. Add the hot pepper, mustard seed, dill seed, and garlic to each jar.

   In a large saucepan combine the vinegar, water, and salt and bring to a boil. Pour the boiling liquid over the beans, leaving 1/2-inch of headspace. Clean the jar rims and threads with a damp clean cloth or paper towel. Center the lids on the jars and screw on the bands. Do not over-tighten.

   Place the jars in the canner rack and lower into the gently boiling water. If the water does not come up to at least 1 inch above the jars, add more hot water.

   When the water returns to a boil with jars in it, cover the canner and boil gently for 5 minutes.** Remove the cover and let the jars stand for 5 minutes.

   Remove the jars from the canner to a rack or heavy towel and let them cool. Do not tilt, tighten, or turn them over.

   After 24 hours, check the jars to make sure they sealed. Remove the bands, wipe the jars clean, label and store in a cool, dark place. Refrigerate any unsealed jars and use within a few days. Alternatively, unsealed jars may be reprocessed by heating the liquid again following recipe instructions and canned in sterilized jars with new lids (discard the old lid that didn't seal properly).

Source


Tuna Salad With Chopped Eggs and Dill

Ingredients

   2 (5- to 6-ounce) cans tuna (drained and flaked)
   2 large eggs (hard-cooked, chopped)
   3 to 4 tablespoons mayonnaise
   2 tablespoons red onion (finely chopped)
   1 tablespoon dill relish
   1/4 teaspoon dill weed (dried)
   Kosher salt, to taste
   Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
   For serving: sandwich bread or lettuce

Steps to Make It

Combine the tuna, chopped eggs, 3 tablespoons of mayonnaise, red onion, dill relish, and dill weed. Add more mayonnaise if needed and season with salt and pepper to taste.



Source




 
master steward
Posts: 2827
Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
1002
forest garden foraging books food preservation cooking fiber arts bee medical herbs
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Dill was my gateway into experimenting with spices in cooking. I don't remember the chef's name, but he had a cooking show on PBS. He used a portable kitchen that he set up outside and usually included a wild food into his recipe from the site. He told me that dill is a spice that one cannot use too much of. I miss that show!
 
Live a little! The night is young! And we have umbrellas in our drinks! This umbrella has a tiny ad:
how do we get more backing of the brk?
https://permies.com/t/145583/backing-brk
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic