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Location: Just off the Delaware Bay in NJ. Zone 7b
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Not sure where this post belongs, but I am so excited I just have to share.  I wanted to read The Mininimalist Gardener by Patrick Whitefield and The Wildcrafting Brewer by Pascal Baudar.  My library system did not have them, but had an option to request books they did not own.  I did so, thinking the library would borrow the books from someplace else in the state (New Jersey).  Instead, they reviewed my request and purchased both books!  Now they will be on the shelves for others to read.  Spreading the word.
 
Mother Tree
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We have a thread here for The Wildcrafting Brewer.  I've been tied up doing other things for a few months but this one was next on my list of books to review.  Perhaps you could write a review for us to tell us what you like about the book?  If you can include the phrase "I give this book X out of 10 acorns" with your score in place of the X then it can be included in the book review grid.  It might be a little while before I can devote the time to writing mine and it would be good to get this book some useful reviews as it really is an excellent one.

I haven't seen the Minimalist Gardener book and we don't seem to have a thread devoted to it yet.  Maybe someone else can make one until I'm not quite so rushed off my feet?
 
Sandy Hale
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Burra Maluca wrote:We have a thread here for The Wildcrafting Brewer.  I've been tied up doing other things for a few months but this one was next on my list of books to review.  Perhaps you could write a review for us to tell us what you like about the book?  If you can include the phrase "I give this book X out of 10 acorns" with your score in place of the X then it can be included in the book review grid.  It might be a little while before I can devote the time to writing mine and it would be good to get this book some useful reviews as it really is an excellent one.

I haven't seen the Minimalist Gardener book and we don't seem to have a thread devoted to it yet.  Maybe someone else can make one until I'm not quite so rushed off my feet?


I would like to review, but not sure how. Directions?
 
garden master
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Here's the tutorial

Here's what the review grid looks like

Good luck!
 
Sandy Hale
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I give this book 9 out of 10 acorns.
After reading it from the library, I’m going too have to buy it.  It is just too full of options for making beer, wine and sodas from found and purchased local ingredients to take pictures of relevant pages or check it out every time I want to brew.  For Baudar, brewing seems to be an ongoing process.  I like the fact that he suggests ingredient ratios small enough to be brewed in quart jars (and larger batches as well.). He develops quite a relationship with his concoctions, assessing fermentation several times a day, tasting frequently and adding ingredients as needed.  These are not fix it and forget it projects.
There is an emphasis on safety, both in gathering and preparing.  I found his explanations of the science of fermentation clear and encouraging. His enthusiasm for really connecting with the local “terroir” , basically what grows where you are, got me thinking Beach Plums and Sumac.  I appreciated his examples from his home turf near Los Angeles, but really tired of how often he referenced ingredients I will never see.  He did add some references to the brews he made for a workshop in Vermont, but I would have vastly preferred more examples from other climates.  My reaction is no doubt influenced by my relative newness (not quite three years) to this ecosystem.
I found The Wildcrafting Brewer to be an inspiration, a jumping off point, useful after I have more thoroughly explored my own terroir.  Which is, of course, a very worthy goal.
 
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