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Very, very Northern California Land Share available for permies friends only.  RSS feed

 
Posts: 11
Location: Weitchpec California
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20 acres mountaintop, good water, Klamath River/Trinity convergence country.  We do wildlife rehab, orphaned and injured, and will use a couple acres for this purpose eventually, but we don't need all of it.  What we need are good people around, just doing their own thing, no hard rules, except you must love animals, especially bears, whom you can live alongside easily, we can teach you.  They're just part of the resident community.  Lots of trees that need thinning, probably a woodworkers delight, great diversity.  A large old terraced garden area with a pond that needs reclaiming.  Ye ole Himalayan introduced blackberry is our enemy, even though delicious on pancakes, we can grow something better and less invasive.  I'm thinking sheep may be our answer.  Any willing shepherds about, I'll be happy to invest in guardian animals and much more, if you are willing to dedicate yourself to both land and animals.  Make a clean and peaceful life privately for yourself if you want.  Just no trash accumulation.  Tiny houses, big backyards, and all logical permaculture tenets apply as the only rules and that's it.  Off Grid.  Land Share/intentional community, whatever you want to call it  The land itself is to be left In Trust for anyone who helps.  We are all volunteers here.  We are the stewards.
 
pollinator
Posts: 346
Location: SW Missouri
36
chicken food preservation goat
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Wow. This needs bumping, what an awesome idea!!
Bump Bump
 
Posts: 328
Location: Redwood Country, Zone 9, 60" rain/yr,
23
dog duck hugelkultur
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Great project! I am down near the 101-199 jct, and work on the College of the Redwoods food forest project in Crescent City. We have a site up in Weitchpec that I have never been to yet.

On the blackberry front, I have used a lot of it as fence material to make a natural barbed fence that will hurt like crazy if an intruder tries it but not kill my great pyrenees if he tears through it protecting his flock.  This has gotten me to the point where I am starting to worry I might not have enough blackberries until I get my wild and thornless going better.

sepp holzer swears by pigs for bramble removal.

Bill Mollison describes in a video on youtube about the old english method to grow a fruit tree amidst them and then run pigs or cattle through once they are big enough to fruit heavily and survive the large animals (7-10yrs). The trees rush to get above the brambles with a long straight trunk and then send out horizontal branches right above them. The tree ends up with perfect broad branching right above your head.
 
desyrae krause
Posts: 11
Location: Weitchpec California
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That's so funny, Ben.  That's exactly how I've been trying to handle these damned Himalayan Blackberries.  Including planting my fruit trees among them.  Gotta have some alternative food resource for our resident bears.   And those native blackberries sure do grow slow.
 
Posts: 2
Location: Lincoln, CA
fish forest garden homestead
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Hey Desyrae, I sent you a PM. I am very interested in this position. Hope its still available. :)
 
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Hello Desyrae

I'm a natural farmer in the strict sense, meaning no-till etc.

I'm in Mendocino county at the moment, and have been looking for,a land partner interested in a cropsharing arrangement or something like that.

I'm familiar with the area up there and it certainly is bear country. When I lived on the Klamath river I had a bear that would bring trash nags,from other people's houses up to my place,and tear them open,in my yard. Every morning I was picking up diapers and whatever else was in there.

as soon as the sun would go down I could scan the perimeter of my yard with a flash light and I'd see his eyes shine in the light. Once he was hiding behind a shed, peaking around then ducking back when he saw,me just like a person might. It was a lot of trouble but pretty funny too.

Beautiful country up there, epic wilderness and very fertile.

I for one love blackberries. As a kid growing up in the redwoods I literally grew up on them, and hold them dearly my heart. Me and,my siblings would pick them and our mom would,make yummy BlackBerry pies. They're a great renewable resource as far as having a constant supply of organic matter.

I've always worked with or around them. They make good compost and great FPJ not to mention they harbor N fixing and P solubilizing
microbes.

But I have thought of away to get rid of them and other invasive species like scotch broom or pompous grass and that is to drench the soil with a solution that is e i their extremely alkaline or extremely acidic.

We have a pygmy forest here in Mendo county which has the most acidic soil on the planet.Its a flat that is 14 miles,long and 4 miles wide that is hard clay under soil that has a pH as low as 2.5; black berries don't grow there, that's what gave me the idea.

I came to the conclusion that alkaline would be the way to go like using calcium hydroxide (gardeners lye) to bring the pHone of the water up to 11. First knock them back with a weed eater than drench the area, repeat a couple of time until everything dies back, then treat the area with microbes to balance the pH and make it usable, cover it with card board nd a layer of soil and plant something quick.

At any rate in a couple of weeks I'll be meeting with some people and checking out some potential farm sites.

A couple here in Mendo a couple in Lake county, and one place that is also in Willow creek.

I'd be very interested in meeting with you to check things out and to discuss the possibility of farming there.

Let me know if you'd be interested
 
Ben Zumeta
Posts: 328
Location: Redwood Country, Zone 9, 60" rain/yr,
23
dog duck hugelkultur
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That’s very interesting to her about n fixing around blackberries. I had noticed in a lot of pulling myself that they leave behind much better soil. I always figured it was all the birds eating the berries and the protection from trampling.
 
desyrae krause
Posts: 11
Location: Weitchpec California
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We would love to see you, Adam, when you come up this way.  Give a call or send a text when you can.  Dez  530-623-0376   Myriah, you too, come for a visit.  We are narrowing down the right people this summer to complete a longterm staff on hand for the animals, and the gardens, and the building, etc.  But it has to suit you first, so come and see if this is where you'd like to live.  And also Hello again, Ben!  Cheers everyone.
 
Adam Blacksheep
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I look forward to speaking with you Desyrae

English, I think those are factors too, they create a nice environment under the brambles that conditions soil to a desirable state . Inside a thick brambles the local soil food web is in prime state.
 
Adam Blacksheep
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to be clear the N fixation in brambles is asymbiotic, not symbiotic like with legumes.

Asmbiotic fixers are free living organisms not in an intimate association with roots. They occur in certain conditions, fix N into bacterial biomass. When these bacteria are the living foundation of every forest and the precise reason a forest grows century after century without needing fertilization even though a soil test would show no surplus of N detected.

Certain other soil organisms devour the bacteria and excrete the N into forms plants can uptake.

As a natural farmer providing these bacteria a habitat is what I shoot for, and black berry leaf litter from a nice lush brambles is a good source for them.

Also you can make FFJ from the fruit when it is ripe and black, or a higher Phos FFJ when the fruit is purple.

A good FPJ can be made from the fresh spring shoots and starts. Also from the plant shoots that grow in dark places like when they bust into sheds, or go under houses and decks etc. places out of direct sunlight, or in darkness; that growth makes good FPJ

Then in the fall well after they have fruited, they grow through another reproductive stage where the tips of the canes put out roots and go through something like a bolting stage to try to plant the rooted tips. They put out runners Basicly and that's one of the ways the brambles seem to grow so fast.

At any rate those rooted tips are loaded with growth hormones that make an excellent FPJ.

 
Ben Zumeta
Posts: 328
Location: Redwood Country, Zone 9, 60" rain/yr,
23
dog duck hugelkultur
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Adam, great info. I though I was a compost tea wonk but I had to look up what FFJ and FPJ are (fermented fruit/plant juice respectively to those who may also be wondering).
 
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