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Russian apricots

 
Posts: 9
Location: Derbyshire, England
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I've stumbled across this link, an excerpt from an early 20th Century book. Russian apricot varieties. I can't find details of any of these cultivars. Does anyone know any different?
http://chestofbooks.com/gardening-horticulture/Thomas-Joseph-Dwyer/Guide-To-Hardy-Fruits-And-Ornamentals/Apricot-Trees-Russian-Varieties-Of-Apricots.html

The apricot apparently originated in the region of China/Russia. It'd make sense that there's plenty of Russian cultivars. Info gratefully received.
 
pollinator
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Location: Central Indiana
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I was looking at planting an apricot next spring so hopping in now for the replies.
 
pollinator
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Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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I think any variety is cold hardy enough for your location. The problem is they bloom really early and almost always get frosted here in MO. I think you might have the same problem. Raintree Nursery has a good selection. I’d use late blooming as the first criteria. The rootstock selection is important, especially if you don’t have good drainage.


Mine have bloomed 4 or 5 years and no fruit yet. They’re attractive little trees and low mantenance when they don’t have fruit to protect from insects and disease.
 
gardener
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I'm not sure if you can get it where you're at, but it might be worthwhile looking into the apricot variety "Puget Gold." It was developed here in the Pacific Northwest (USA). We have a maritime climate which is often compared to England. This apricot is very reliable here even with the wet springs and is supposed to be easy to grow.
 
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Location: Tampa, Florida
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"I'm not sure if you can get it where you're at, but it might be worthwhile looking into the apricot variety "Puget Gold." It was developed here in the Pacific Northwest (USA). We have a maritime climate which is often compared to England. This apricot is very reliable here even with the wet springs and is supposed to be easy to grow."



That's good to know, James. Thanks for sharing!
 
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