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Citrus fruits in a hugelbed?  RSS feed

 
Posts: 162
Location: Galicia, Spain
10
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We are putting in our second Hugel, size and orientation below, in the hope that the higher ground and French drain in front will prevent the flooding we have experienced over the last couple of years.  Soggy ground prevention aside, the orientation is as below and I thought of making it curved to give some diffent aspects tot he bed and to act as a slight sun scoop.
My questions are - what to plant in each of the 6 zones.  We were thinking that we could risk citrus as the sloping southern sides would be facing the winter Sun.  We are zone 9b but have experienced rogue frosts in the last few years and the field south of the bed rises 7 metres over 30 metres and can get rather frosty and remain so even after everything else has thawed.  The ground never freezes, we get snow for a few hours once or twice a year and we always fleece our fruit trees overnight in winter just in case.  I thought we could also include soft fruits.
But what to do on the colder sides?  We are at lat 43 to give you sone idea of sun angles.
As always I would be grateful for your suggestions.
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Posts: 163
Location: Western Washington
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Some citrus, like Yuzu, can take frost and snow just fine. Trifolate orange is supposed to be another good option. I grow both here, in zone 8. I think citrus would be just fine on this bed, depending. Also the hugel bed will generally be warmer for a number of reasons. Mine are so active biologically even in winter that the snow on them melts ages before everywhere else.

Some feel that planting trees on a hugel is risky, because they worry that the tree can't properly anchor itself with wood in the way. I leave gaps between the logs large enough so that some larger roots can grow between them and anchor. Yes, it might reduce the "core effect" of having a large bloc of wood at the center, but that's ok. I planted at least one tree in a hugel this year (a dwarf cherry) and it did fantastically well. It was noticeably more drought tolerant because of it.
 
Amanda Launchbury-Rainey
Posts: 162
Location: Galicia, Spain
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Thanks James Landreth
That was fast work! Good tip on leaving some gaps - will deffo do that. Will source those fruits!
 
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Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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I heard of a mandarin orange that can handle 4F.  It's called Changsha.  I know very little about it but that could solve some of your problems.
 
Amanda Launchbury-Rainey
Posts: 162
Location: Galicia, Spain
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Mike Jay wrote:I heard of a mandarin orange that can handle 4F.  It's called Changsha.  I know very little about it but that could solve some of your problems.



Thanks Mike Jay
 
Amanda Launchbury-Rainey
Posts: 162
Location: Galicia, Spain
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As an update, thought you might like to see some pics. I had to tidy an area of logs and cuttings so I  have sort of arranged them so they intertwine for stability and will be chucking all our dog mess over them cos otherwise it goes into doggy bags and in the village bin. Less plastic !  Now we wait for the diggerman, Jose Tractor, and the plumber, Tony Taps, to come and get the drainage in. All the soil (a vague term for what we have here) will go over the wood and we will jump up and down on it to work it through. My friend with a horse is collecting manure that I can incorporate and I am considering putting our humanure at the bottom to continue its composting. That and a good covering of woodchips and leaves held gown with gorse and scottish broom cuttings over the winter should do the trick. Now its just trying to work  out what to plant...

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