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How is your October harvest for the month  RSS feed

 
Posts: 167
Location: On the plateau in TN
9
books food preservation urban
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Jade bush beans: 5.2 oz for me so far.
 
Posts: 424
Location: Middle Georgia
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I am fairly new to gardening so my harvests are modest.

Have bush beans maturing, just checked them yesterday and the beans are still small but growing! Our temps are still warm so that is okay.  Other thing I am harvesting is snow peas. I think they are my favorite vegetable ever. Hope I can get plenty more this fall. Also getting plenty of bell peppers.
 
Michael Moreken
Posts: 167
Location: On the plateau in TN
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Jade bush beans: 5.2 oz so far.
 
Michael Moreken
Posts: 167
Location: On the plateau in TN
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Yes thank you Mike Jay, I inadvertently posting in wrong forum.
 
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Good harvest this year. Corn, bell peppers, cukes, and tomatoes. Even my two grape vines provided more than expected. And I live on the Oregon coast.
 
Posts: 111
Location: France, Burgundy, parc naturel Morvan
15
fish food preservation forest garden fungi homestead cooking solar trees wood heat woodworking
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Good. Pumpkins, husk tomatoes, tomatoes, cewcumber, basil, chilipeppers, peaches, apples,pears, drying herbs and looking for nuts and mushrooms are popping up!
 
Posts: 261
Location: West Midlands UK (zone 8b) Rainfall 26"
18
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My October harvest is salad.  Corn salad, mallow, land cress, rocket, chickweed, still a few bits of lettuce and golden beet leaves.  Corn salad and mallow will go all winter if last year is anythying to go by.
 
Michael Moreken
Posts: 167
Location: On the plateau in TN
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We are blessed with all of our harvests.  I have spent:

Misc -$20.00
Seed -$25.97
Plant -$7.95
Compost -$167.10
Hardware -$194.68

Sum -$415.70

:) And I do NOT have any Fence up yet.  

I had local dogs trample my Jade bush beans 'cutting the corner', solved that by putting buckets at that corner.  I had minor damage from snails.  And have some mysterious leaf fungus attacking some of my planted 3 inch Fava beans.  Looks like I may or have already lost a couple of favas.  At this time here I see wild onion popping up everywhere.
 
Lucrecia Anderson
Posts: 424
Location: Middle Georgia
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Michael Moreken wrote:We are blessed with all of our harvests.  I have spent:

Misc -$20.00
Seed -$25.97
Plant -$7.95
Compost -$167.10
Hardware -$194.68

Sum -$415.70

:) And I do NOT have any Fence up yet.  

I had local dogs trample my Jade bush beans 'cutting the corner', solved that by putting buckets at that corner.  I had minor damage from snails.  And have some mysterious leaf fungus attacking some of my planted 3 inch Fava beans.  Looks like I may or have already lost a couple of favas.  At this time here I see wild onion popping up everywhere.



Best not to add up what you spent on the garden. You feel much happier with your "fresh free food harvested from the garden" if you haven't calculated the costs!

I bought 20 or so different types of seeds last year, one nice thing is I like won't be buying any seed this year except maybe for some Trionfo Violetto Pole Beans. I have heard they are one of the best ever long producing pole beans and the beans are bright purple (turn green when steamed) so easy to find. Will grow them over the chicken coop netting for shade (and beans) next summer.

"A census taker came to my house. I ate his liver with some fava beans and a nice Chianti" (Couldn't help it, I am probably not the only one that thinks of Hannibal Lecture ever time I hear fava beans)
 
Posts: 105
Location: The Ocala National Forest. Florida, USA
9
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Although I started the harvest in mid sept, the Japanese persimmons are ripening and by estimate it'll be 150-5oz persimmons for October. Planted that tree 18 years ago, paid like $35. for it and since maturity it produces around 75-100lbs of fruit a year. It does take every 4th or 5th year off. It'll get pruned by 1/4 this year though, to many out of reach due height. The sweet potatoes I'll be digging up soon and got 6 seminole pumpkins when I pulled all the vines last week. There's also a few (4-5) cow horn peppers that'll be ready anytime too. I've been bad about getting winter stuff planted, I need to get with that.
 
Michael Moreken
Posts: 167
Location: On the plateau in TN
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I harvested another 2.8 oz of Jade beans today.  We have a frost warning for Sunday night.
 
pollinator
Posts: 2130
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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Bitter Orange
Grape
Jujube
Pear
Apple
Figs

Medlar will be next month

Tomatoes, Peppers, Greens, Mint/Thyme family herbs, Onion/Garlic Family herbs, Medicinal Herbs. Lovage has done the usual of drying down to the roots after the seed head dries and now has new growth from the roots.
 
Michael Moreken
Posts: 167
Location: On the plateau in TN
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Annie Lochte wrote:Although I started the harvest in mid sept, the Japanese persimmons are ripening and by estimate it'll be 150-5oz persimmons for October. Planted that tree 18 years ago, paid like $35. for it and since maturity it produces around 75-100lbs of fruit a year. It does take every 4th or 5th year off. It'll get pruned by 1/4 this year though, to many out of reach due height.



I have a wild persimmon, across the street and was very productive this year, and saw and met teens harvesting them.   I ate a few to date.  
 
Michael Moreken
Posts: 167
Location: On the plateau in TN
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Lucrecia Anderson wrote:
Best not to add up what you spent on the garden. You feel much happier with your "fresh free food harvested from the garden" if you haven't calculated the costs!

"A census taker came to my house. I ate his liver with some fava beans and a nice Chianti" (Couldn't help it, I am probably not the only one that thinks of Hannibal Lecture ever time I hear fava beans)



Can not help myself as I am a nerd.  ;)
 
Posts: 353
Location: SW PA USA zone 6a altitude 1188ft
4
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I picked all my remaining tomatoes in advance of possible frost overnight. They weighed 5.5 pounds mostly beefsteaks, with a few yellow pear tomatoes thrown in. I already have 4 mostly ripened beafsteaks which I picked prior to this pick. The only thing I have left is some carrots, in the ground, and a few as yet unpicked gourds. The neighbors took every pumpkin we had, even the small one inch developing fruit just after blossoming.  We've been planting the same very small and small pumpkins for years from seed saved from prior years. I do still have seed from last years crops which I'll have to plant and reestablish that line. We also grew some big pumpkins for the first time.
 
Michael Moreken
Posts: 167
Location: On the plateau in TN
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Harvested 3.5 oz today.  Last night we had first frost.  I covered the Jade beans with some newspaper and fine nylon netting last night.

We are having another freeze tonight, put out the same protection, if they survive it looks like I'll sail for a week with warmer temperatures.  I'd say 3 leaves from 2 plants got nipped last night.

:) So crossing my fingers, suppose to get to 30°F tonight!

Still have small beans and flowers on the plants.
 
Lucrecia Anderson
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Location: Middle Georgia
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Michael Moreken wrote:
We are having another freeze tonight, put out the same protection, if they survive it looks like I'll sail for a week with warmer temperatures.  I'd say 3 leaves from 2 plants got nipped last night.



In august I put some pvc hoops over 2 beds for row covers (shade cloth in the summer for transplants, then plastic in winter). Saw a video using string that allowed the covers to be pulled up/down without removing them. Of course the bed full of blooming green beans does not have hoops though I guess I could try to put a cover over them if we get a freeze in the next couple of weeks.

The row covers will also be handy for protecting spring transplants from late frosts.
 
Michael Moreken
Posts: 167
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Lucrecia Anderson wrote:

Michael Moreken wrote:
We are having another freeze tonight, put out the same protection, if they survive it looks like I'll sail for a week with warmer temperatures.  I'd say 3 leaves from 2 plants got nipped last night.



In august I put some pvc hoops over 2 beds for row covers (shade cloth in the summer for transplants, then plastic in winter).

The row covers will also be handy for protecting spring transplants from late frosts.



Yes TU Lucercia, know all the info about protecting crops.  I almost yesterday bought 'proper' frost row covers two days ago from an internet sale.  But said no, I can order in Spring if I want to plant out earlier.

I survived tonight now can sail for ~6 days with no protection, Jade bush beans looked happy.  It apparently got to 26°F the night before, and last night they called a frost but looks like it got down to 'only' 36°F so I guess in hind side, I did not have to use my rinky dink protection.  Rolling up the nylon each morning :)
 
John Duda
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Location: SW PA USA zone 6a altitude 1188ft
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I have a suggestion for frost protection with out covers. If you have a mower that will bag, put the clippings in plastic bags. I've used the contractors bags and the big can liners. You put the bags between and around the crops you wish to protect. Of course; if you also cover the crops and bags you'll get protection to a lower temperature. You can also use grass clippings with leafs, or all leaves. But the more grass clippings the more heat you'll get in the short time your bags have to get active.
 
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Apples (for cider), pomegranates, lemons, black walnuts, acorns, red and yellow peppers, tomatoes, several varieties of basil, thyme, lemon thyme, oregano, sage, comfrey, green onions, chard, pak choy greens, cucumbers, butternut squash, summer squash, eggs from the hens.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1215
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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Just to give a tropical perspective......

October harvests this year for me include .....
...fruits : lilikoi, papaya, jackfruit, guava, bananas, pineapple, limes, a few avocado (end of season for me tree), a few Ka'u oranges (beginning of season)
...veggies : beans, beets, leeks, pipinola, pumpkins, peas, cowpeas, pigeon peas, potatoes, sweet potatoes, turnips, pac choi, tatsoi, cabbage, broccoli, eggplant, a few peppers, radishes, daikon, taro, breadfruit, a handful of cherry tomatoes, some early turmeric although it's not well colored up yet
...greens : kale, chard, collards, Portuguese cabbage, chaya, sweet potato, pipinola, taro, Okinawan spinach, cholesterol spinach, lettuce, assorted Asian greens
...herbs & flavorings : mint, clove, allspice, basil, bay, celery leaf, chives, oregano, rosemary, chervil (and probably a few others I'm not thinking of right now)
...animal products : eggs, old hens, goat milk, just butchered a pig and still have a lamb that needs to go into the freezer

Being able to garden year around is one of the benefits of a tropical location. But we still have some seasonal aspects to food production. You may have noticed some things are missing from my harvest list. Some I haven't gotten around to planting, while others are seasonal. In October I don't get parsnips, yacon, cabbage, or cauliflower yet because it's not ready for harvesting. Most of the tomatoes and peppers are mature and winding down. No zucchini, summer squash, or cucumbers right now since they are crops that I have to grow in a screened greenhouse and I haven't bothered with them lately. And October is usually too cool for okra and soybean my farm, although this year I could have gotten some if I had planted it in a timely fashion. Nights have been warm these past months. No carrots right now because I messed up on getting them planted. And I missed getting a few other crops into the ground in time, too. So I have a bit of a gap in the harvesting schedule which should correct itself in another month or two. No globe onions this time of year but plenty of green onions instead.
 
Michael Moreken
Posts: 167
Location: On the plateau in TN
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John Duda wrote:I have a suggestion for frost protection with out covers. If you have a mower that will bag, put the clippings in plastic bags. I've used the contractors bags and the big can liners. You put the bags between and around the crops you wish to protect. Of course; if you also cover the crops and bags you'll get protection to a lower temperature. You can also use grass clippings with leafs, or all leaves. But the more grass clippings the more heat you'll get in the short time your bags have to get active.



Interesting, I have no mower that bags.  Jade plants are alright today.   Ate exactly one bean today and yesterday.
 
John Duda
Posts: 353
Location: SW PA USA zone 6a altitude 1188ft
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Mike:

My mower would bag, but I can't lift the blower attachment that's needed. I need it for leafs, the alternative is to blow the leafs into a pile, until the belt burns out and then I'm done for the year.

<insert Smiley>
 
pollinator
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Oh Mike - I'm rolling on the floor in hysterics!   Your dry humor tickled my bones and I needed that because I just harvested sweet potatoes today.  
21 plants, usually yield about 250 lbs.   So this year.....wait for it.....  7.6 pounds!    Thanks for the laughs - it kept me from going suicidal - hahahahahaha!
 
Why does your bag say "bombs"? The reason I ask is that my bag says "tiny ads" and it has stuff like this:
Wild Homesteading - Work with nature to grow food and start/build your homestead
https://permies.com/t/96779/Wild-Homesteading-Work-nature-grow
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