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Most used Fall tools

 
garden master
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Tomorrow will be the official last day of Fall this year for most of us.

I thought it would be neat to see the tools used the most by season. I know the tools I use differ greatly by season and the different projects I'm working on.

To me Fall is a great time when it's cooler outside, and I feel like it's easier to get some much needed work done outside.

I've been planting a lot this Fall, and my Fiskars steel shovel has been amazing! My last wood handled shovel snapped trying to dig up some roots, but this shovel is like a pry bar that can be used without fear of breaking.

Another tool I've used a lot is my pruners, slightly pruning some plants that may need a little trimming of dead or broken branches.

Lastly, I've used a pruning knife to prune some hard to reach areas on plants.

What tools have you been using this Fall or in previous falls?!

Since winter's only two days away, here's another thread about
Most used Winter tools

Also, here's a similar older thread about Hand tools you use the most
 
gardener
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I use my hori hori knife a lot this time of year. I use it a bunch for chop-and-drop and for planting perennial plants in my hugel beds. In my area fall is one of the best times of the year to plant shrubs and trees so I end up doing a fair bit.

My hugel beds have soft enough soil that the hori hori knife works great but for some larger trees or shrubs then I need to go back to a shovel - or when I'm working on harder ground.

Other than the hori hori knife and shovel my wheelbarrow gets a lot of use this time of year. I guess the other tool I use a lot this time of year is the trusty 5 gallon bucket and my mulching fork. Both see a fair bit of use since I also do a lot of mulching this time of year.
 
master pollinator
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Rake, shovel, pick-axe, loppers, saw, post puller, post pounder, wheelbarrow, buckets.
 
Steve Thorn
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Daron Williams wrote:I use my hori hori knife a lot this time of year. I use it a bunch for chop-and-drop and for planting perennial plants in my hugel beds. In my area fall is one of the best times of the year to plant shrubs and trees so I end up doing a fair bit.

My hugel beds have soft enough soil that the hori hori knife works great but for some larger trees or shrubs then I need to go back to a shovel - or when I'm working on harder ground.



I bought a hori hori knife earlier this year, but I haven't even used it yet. I need to just jump in and start using it, then I probably won't be able to put it down. I've been using a small hand sickle for my chip and drop, but with the hori hori knife I could probably cut down on the number of tools I carry.

Daron Williams wrote: Other than the hori hori knife and shovel my wheelbarrow gets a lot of use this time of year. I guess the other tool I use a lot this time of year is the trusty 5 gallon bucket and my mulching fork. Both see a fair bit of use since I also do a lot of mulching this time of year.



Same here. I also use a 5 gallon bucket to soak my plants before planting them.

I found this Gorilla Carts 6-cu ft Poly Yard Cart, and it has been a huge asset for my homestead. It's easy to pull, has a 1,200 lb hauling capacity, easy pull handle for dumping, and can also be towed behind a lawn mower for bigger jobs.





(Source: Lowes.com)

 
Steve Thorn
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Tyler Ludens wrote:Rake, shovel, pick-axe, loppers, saw, post puller, post pounder, wheelbarrow, buckets.



The post puller is a neat tool , I'm guessing for a fencing project?
 
Tyler Ludens
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I've been removing old sheep fencing and using it to make deer-proof (I hope!) fencing.  Lots of posts to pull.  I'm putting a double fence around the house and gardens area and around some other plantings.
 
Steve Thorn
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Very cool, for the double fence, like two fences, one right inside the other?
 
Tyler Ludens
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Yes, I'm trying a short outer fence and about four feet inside, a slightly higher fence.  So far it seems to be working perfectly.  In many places the inner fence is simply fastened to trees, with the outer one made of the fencing left over from when we had sheep.

 
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Shovel (spade), garden trowel, wheelbarrow, compact electric chainsaw, splitting maul, rakes, loppers, channel-lock pliers, crescent wrench.
 
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