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Best time to remove Large Weed

 
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I have some tree weeds that grew up right beside some of my perenials, that I didn't pull out when they were young, and I was trying to think of the best time to pull them out to minimize the root disturbance for the perenial.

I was thinking it would definitely be best while the plant was dormant, but was wandering if it would be better if the soil was wet or dry?

I guess the best thing would probably be to try to cut it out right below the soil line, maybe with a hori hori knife, to avoid any root disturbance?

Just wanted to get some ideas which way would be best or if anyone had some previous experience on what worked best for them.
 
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Not knowing what type of tree it is, I'd cut it off at ground level.  Then cut off the regrowth until it stops regrowing.  If it's a good candidate for coppicing, that could be an option unless it negatively affects your perennials.
 
Steve Thorn
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I think they're mostly maple tree seedlings.
 
Mike Jay Haasl
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Then they'll die after a few cuttings.  I chopped a 7' maple in my front yard this early spring.  Mid summer the stump sent up about a dozen suckers and I cut them when I got around to it.  I think it's now dead.
 
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I've removed lots of wild guava saplings by cutting them off at soil level then spraying the very early regrowth with vinegar. The occasional persist tree that refuses to die, I will cover it with an inside down bucket for a while.
 
Steve Thorn
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Mike Jay wrote:Then they'll die after a few cuttings.  I chopped a 7' maple in my front yard this early spring.  Mid summer the stump sent up about a dozen suckers and I cut them when I got around to it.  I think it's now dead.



That's good to hear. I'll do that then so as not to disturb the roots.
 
Steve Thorn
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Su Ba wrote:I've removed lots of wild guava saplings by cutting them off at soil level then spraying the very early regrowth with vinegar. The occasional persist tree that refuses to die, I will cover it with an inside down bucket for a while.



That's a really good tip Su, I'll try that if any of them send up new growth. I really like the idea of shading them out too, great tips!
 
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