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This thread is all about Dixondale Farms.




Dixondale Farms has been providing onion plants throughout the US for 105 years! Located in south Texas along the Mexico border, we are a family farm operation devoted to serving our customers. Dixondale Farms strives to provide the highest quality onion plants and customer service available. We are available year-round for all your onion plant growing needs.

A Short History of Dixondale Farms
As told by Jeanie Martin Frasier
In the early 1900's, my great-grandfather, John Mabson McClendon, moved his family to Dimmit County from a small Central Texas town called Pancake, TX. He began farming an area north of town called the Dixondale addition in the Wintergarden area. All of us at Dixondale Farms still live in that section of town as neighbors. John's son, Earl, who was 15 at the time, began farming with his father, growing onion transplants and sending them by train to farmers throughout the United States. Earl married Lula Bell, who came from a large old established family here. As you see, our roots run deep in South Texas. They continued farming through the Depression and World War II. They eventually offered the farming business to my father (their son-in-law) after he got out of the Army and graduated from the University of Texas in 1948. Earl remained active in farming and ranching until his death in 1983.

My father, Wallace Martin, continued growing transplants, as well as producing other crops such as cabbage and cauliflower. In 1982, my husband, Bruce Frasier, got out of the Army and began working with Dixondale Farms. It was then that Bruce saw a need to distribute his product to home gardeners. In 1990, UPS started providing delivery service to Carrizo Springs, and we began sending out small quantities of onion plants via UPS and USPS. Today we ship over 800 million onion plants to farmers, home gardeners, and garden centers around the country. We often laugh at the similarities between the past two generations of Dixondale Farms farmers. My father and my husband are both civil engineers by education and farmers by the grace of God. Both came into the business after leaving the Army and the business was handed down from father-in-law to son-in-law. At age 92, my father, Wallace, is still available for his vast onion knowledge and advice.



Ships within US, with restrictions in Oregon and Idaho.

http://www.dixondalefarms.com
COMMENTS:
 
pioneer
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Posts: 1236
Location: Middle Tennessee
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I give this seed source 9 out of 10 acorns.

Another small family run farm, I've been growing onions from Dixondale in my garden for a number of years now, with good success. Dixondale sells onion plants, not onion sets or seeds. They mostly focus on onions, but they do offer leeks and shallots as well. These fine folks are my go to source for my onion needs.
 
Posts: 11
Location: Mid Missouri north of the Ozarks
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I've used Dixondale for about four years now and I am exceedingly happy with their service and their onions. I have had stunning harvests from the onions year after year. I plant keeper onions--Copra or Superstar--for my area (Mid-Missouri area) and I always do a red onion for variety. The keepers will still be good when I'm tending the next year's onions. I've had decent keepers right into late May. Dixondale is good to send out little onion-growing suggestions from time to time to keep me on track. They are great!
 
pollinator
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If give this source 10 out of 10. I've been buying from them for a long time. They give you plenty of extra plants per bundle. Their varieties grow great on my farm. And whenever I have a problem or question, I can email them and they will help me out. They were a big help when I was trying to learn to grow good onions.
 
pioneer
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I give this seed source 10 out of 10 acorns.  Our local master gardeners have been using them for years and the onion plants do great.  I'm struggling with just giving up growing my own onions from seed since the Dixondale ones are so much better.
 
gardener
Posts: 1886
Location: Grand Valley of Colorado's Western Slope
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Add my voice to the chorus.  10 out of 10.  I have at least a dozen years experience with their stock, never had anything but great results.

lots of varieties to choose from, plenty of information on long short and intermediate varieties to help choose which is right.

Storage onions, sweet onions, red onions white onions gold onions

heirloom varieties too, Ailsa Craig, and cippolini (in more than one color).

If you are wondering, the reason I prefer the plants to the little sets is that many times the sets make onions with double centers, the plants don't. The sets have never done as welll for me, I get more than 90 % survival to onion with the plants, and not even half of that with the sets.

And it's been my experience that their bunches are quite generous.  They say  70 plants per bunch.  In addition, there are plenty of plants in the bunch that are thread like and tiny, beyond the 70 plants promosied.  Those thready tiny ones also make onions.

 
pollinator
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Location: Southern Arizona. Zone 8b
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I used to buy onion starts from Dixondale, but the last bunch I bought from them they trimmed the roots off on about 1/3 of them half way up the bulb, I didn't figure they'd survive, but planted them anyway.  They didn't survive.

I now buy starts from a local source, or start them myself when I have time.
 
Thekla McDaniels
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Posts: 1886
Location: Grand Valley of Colorado's Western Slope
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Peter, did you contact them about those onion plants?  I'd be really interested to know what kind of response they give when things do go wrong.
 
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