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Early spring and scions are coming.

 
pollinator
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Found out my order of Asian Pear scions are coming but most of my Asian Pears are already blooming.  Is it too late for the ones that have flowered?  

On what I read on Dr. Redhawks posts, the budding grafts can be done in summer.   I am a newby at grafting so any help and guidance is needed.

I do have one or two that have not started blooming yet.  At least the when I last checked.  A cleft graft looks easiest to my clumsy fingers and poor technique but I ask what others find is best for a greenhorn.

I have some kiwi cuttings coming too, so in the pots they go.
 
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With your trees already blooming I'd go for bud grafting, with the sap already flowing the buds will seat in and take off within a couple of weeks.
 
Dennis Bangham
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The scions just arrived.  I see where chip budding is recommended at anytime.  But the pictures show removing the stem before wrapping.
The scions are all dormant but have well developed buds.  DO I remove the bud or wrap around it and hope for the best?
Can I graft on any side of the tree or should I do the northern side of the tree so it will shade the bud while it grows?  The trees are 5 to 8 years old.
Sorry a lot of questions but now it is warming up and looks like a several week warm spell coming.
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Asian Pear scions
 
pollinator
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what's the best way for dealing with scions in this state if you don't have anything to graft them to? I am thinking about just sticking them in pots filled with a mixture of beach sand (pretty coarse around here) and peat moss and keeping them in a shady place and hoping they root. Will this produce a viable tree? I was hoping it would at least work to make something that I could take grafts off of later.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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I was taught to remove the bud then graft it into the parent tree.
To remove a bud from a scion you want to cut deep enough to take some wood behind the bud (nice sharp enough to cut you when you look at it knife, or use a razor knife).
Once the bud it removed, make a T slit in the bark all the way through the cambium layer then insert the bud and wrap in place with rubber band material, when the rubber band rots off, the bud should have taken nicely.
If it begins to form a branch and the wound looks like it is swelling a lot, you can remove the band and be safe.
 
Dennis Bangham
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Darn,  I went and bud grafted all of them with the bud intact.  I will have to wait to see if any of them have survived the grafting.  
 
Dennis Bangham
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How long before I can remove the tape?  I don't see any branches forming but it has only been a little over a month.  Is it too early?
 
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I think all my Apple grafts failed.  :(

 
Dennis Bangham
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I am thinking the same here. I will wait another month and remove the tape to see what damage was done.
 
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