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Time needed for apple scions to leaf out?

 
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For some reason, I can't seem to locate a definitive time line for the average span it takes for apple scions to leaf out from rootstock? This is my first year grafting and I'm getting a little concerned. All my rootstock is leafing below the graft and I've been rubbing off the leaves. Any insight appreciated, thanks.

 
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I haven't done too much grafting but of the 6 trees I grafted, I didn't rub off any leaves during the first year.  That way, if the graft fails, you have a rooted stick to graft to next year.  If by mid summer the scion hasn't pushed growth, I think it probably failed.  Let the baby tree grow and try again next year.
 
Michael Adams
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General orchardist consensus seems to say to rub off new rootstock growth to give the scions best chance possible, which I've been doing.
 
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At what time of the year did you graft? to early and the scion can die from lack of nutrient flow, to late and the graft might fail from too much sap flow.

I do my grafts just as leaf out is starting, the buds are swelling so the sap is rising and I have the best chance for success at this time.
One of the mistakes I've seen happen quite often is failure to match up the cambium layers between scion and host.

If your grafts aren't showing signs of life after one month of being installed, it is possible that there was scab over by the host sap trying to heal the wound.
Inspect the graft site, if the host is budding below the graft and the graft is doing nothing, then odds are good that the graft failed to take.

Redhawk
 
Michael Adams
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Thanks RedHawk, I’m confident the grafts were tight as I used the lee valley omega grafting tool which I was very pleased with. My scions were in the fridge all winter and well wrapped and prepped. It’s been just over 2 weeks, so I will continue to monitor them and hope for the best. They were planted June 11 just after the 1rst 1/4 moon.
 
Mike Jay
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Where in the country do you live?  I plant mine the same time as tomatoes and other frost intolerant veggies.  And how long were the scions in the fridge?  I try to cut mine in late winter (Feb/Mar) and graft in April.  I leave them in the cold root cellar to heal before planting in June.  I'm guessing that if the scions are in the fridge for more than two months there's a greater chance that they'll not be as viable due to the challenges of keeping them in the ideal humidity range.  That's for grafting to rootstock on the bench.  If I'm grafting to established trees I was told to do that when the dandelions first start blooming in spring and it seems to work so far.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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I'd give those at least two more weeks, they should come around and start budding.

I watch the stems to see if there is any bud formation starting up, these look at first like little bumps in the bark then the bud form appears as these mature.
 
Michael Adams
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Yes, meant to mention I'm in Zone 6a eastern Canada. There was no chance of planting in May as the fields were soaked and we had a month straight of rain.

Ok...another 2 weeks I shall wait. The root stock is all leafing, so worse case scenario is to try grafting again next spring. I planted 100 all together, 30 of which were heritage/old-stock cultivars.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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With the way the weather has been goin in Canada this year, You might need to give them around 6 seeks more.

I'm more familiar with the west of Canada, weather wise since that is where our kids live, but I would imagine your area is fairly similar this year.
 
Michael Adams
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I grew up in western Canada and am more familiar with those weather patterns, I've found the east is a whole other ball game..lol. The rain this spring has been substantial, but also much needed. It's also been quite cold and we've only had 3-4 days around 20-23 cel. Some heat is definitely needed.

 
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